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    Hello there!

    I've wanted to study architecture at uni for a while now but reading into it recently has started to make me questions myself. This is mainly due to the time it will take up (in day to day life not just the 7yrs at uni) and the sacrifices i would have to make as a result. I love art (painting and drawing) and fear that would not have enough time to spend on it. Not being able to spend a lot of time socializing or focusing on relationships at all doesn't sound great either. For the hours you work the money isn't great either, which I think will affect me too.

    I have A*'s in Art and Graphics at GCSE but only B's in Maths and Physics. Overall 2A*'s, 4A's, 3B's and a C.

    I am currently studying Maths, Physics, Art and Welsh Bacc at AS Level with a target of straight A's.

    Uni wise i have been looking at Cardiff, UCL, Bath, Kent and a few others.

    I really want to decide whether to pursue architecture or if it would be smart to look at other potential careers.

    Any advice, other potential careers or any help at all would be really great.

    Thankyou!!
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    I'm a Cardiff archi student and hope my experience could help you decide. Architecture is a really fascinating subject, the people who do it are passionate about what they do. Yes it really does require your ultimate commitment because, without doubt, you will be spending nearly 15 hour per day thinking about what is the next thing to do for the project or what to prepare for the upcoming interim crit. What I find exciting about this subject is that it's not just about buildings, okay the end result may be a building design but the process involves more than that. You get to wander off into many different directions how ever the fancy takes you to do the project.

    This really is one of the most difficult degrees you could do out there and if you feel like your priority is to spend time on other things then you might want to consider other options because this will become your life. You will be breathing in and out architecture and have ideas running around in your head all the time. When I first got here it was a nightmare. I panicked with the workloads and didn't feel like doing it anymore, because at that point I was looking at it as a SUBJECT which requires me to complete given tasks. But now I'm approaching it from a different perspective, I got interested in the project and it really became part of me. Once you have this embeded in you, it's almost like you don't even have to worry about separating architecture with personal life anymore. These days I learnt to multitask, to cook and think about ideas, to walk to uni and plan out the presentation and so on. This subject will change your life I'm telling you. You'll become a much more efficient and organised person.

    Honestly at the end of the day it is you who decides. Can you think of anything else to do? Are you ready to become a new person?
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    (Original post by Indiestreet)
    I'm a Cardiff archi student and hope my experience could help you decide. Architecture is a really fascinating subject, the people who do it are passionate about what they do. Yes it really does require your ultimate commitment because, without doubt, you will be spending nearly 15 hour per day thinking about what is the next thing to do for the project or what to prepare for the upcoming interim crit. What I find exciting about this subject is that it's not just about buildings, okay the end result may be a building design but the process involves more than that. You get to wander off into many different directions how ever the fancy takes you to do the project.

    This really is one of the most difficult degrees you could do out there and if you feel like your priority is to spend time on other things then you might want to consider other options because this will become your life. You will be breathing in and out architecture and have ideas running around in your head all the time. When I first got here it was a nightmare. I panicked with the workloads and didn't feel like doing it anymore, because at that point I was looking at it as a SUBJECT which requires me to complete given tasks. But now I'm approaching it from a different perspective, I got interested in the project and it really became part of me. Once you have this embeded in you, it's almost like you don't even have to worry about separating architecture with personal life anymore. These days I learnt to multitask, to cook and think about ideas, to walk to uni and plan out the presentation and so on. This subject will change your life I'm telling you. You'll become a much more efficient and organised person.

    Honestly at the end of the day it is you who decides. Can you think of anything else to do? Are you ready to become a new person?
    Thankyou so much! Your perspective is really helpful I get so motivated reading things like this and i can't really think of any careers that i'd find as exciting. After reading this i feel like i really want to do it i cant help but think about the negatives from what i've read. For example, apprently the criticizm can really put people off, The money for the hours you work is really quite bad(+a lot of dept after uni) not having time to simply socialise.
    Could you tell me if these have affected you at all? (Excluding the work based ones)
    Thanks again
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    (Original post by Sketch26)
    Thankyou so much! Your perspective is really helpful I get so motivated reading things like this and i can't really think of any careers that i'd find as exciting. After reading this i feel like i really want to do it i cant help but think about the negatives from what i've read. For example, apprently the criticizm can really put people off, The money for the hours you work is really quite bad(+a lot of dept after uni) not having time to simply socialise.
    Could you tell me if these have affected you at all? (Excluding the work based ones)
    Thanks again
    Im really glad my story helps haha. When people talk about 'low pay' in architecture it is different than a 'low pay' in retail management or those jobs that require less amount of time and effort to be in the position. When they compare architecture with other professionals, it is often law, business, finance, accounting etc. where you could spend much less time in uni and straightaway after graduate earn double the amount. In architecture the starting amount could be less than those mentioned above but gradually it will rise and rise. One thing I have to mention as well is that, this profession is one of a few where you can transfer around the world and take your skills to a new country with higher pay. From what I've learnt growing up doing what I love is that, no matter what you do only if do it best you'll achieve top results.

    If people say architecture pays so little, why are there so many successful architects out there? Because money wasn't their priority, but because they knew that was their best talent so they kept doing what they're good at. If you have that passion to do architecture, please let your heart lead the way because everyday you will want to wake up to do it. The secret of every profession is that you only need to become the top 10% of that specific job, because they are the ones who earn the most. So how did these people become top 10% of the population - they did what they loved.
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    (Original post by Indiestreet)
    Im really glad my story helps haha. When people talk about 'low pay' in architecture it is different than a 'low pay' in retail management or those jobs that require less amount of time and effort to be in the position. When they compare architecture with other professionals, it is often law, business, finance, accounting etc. where you could spend much less time in uni and straightaway after graduate earn double the amount. In architecture the starting amount could be less than those mentioned above but gradually it will rise and rise. One thing I have to mention as well is that, this profession is one of a few where you can transfer around the world and take your skills to a new country with higher pay. From what I've learnt growing up doing what I love is that, no matter what you do only if do it best you'll achieve top results.

    If people say architecture pays so little, why are there so many successful architects out there? Because money wasn't their priority, but because they knew that was their best talent so they kept doing what they're good at. If you have that passion to do architecture, please let your heart lead the way because everyday you will want to wake up to do it. The secret of every profession is that you only need to become the top 10% of that specific job, because they are the ones who earn the most. So how did these people become top 10% of the population - they did what they loved.
    Wow, you seem like you really love it! I get what you're saying and the traveling thing sounds amazing to me, I've always intended on travelling at some point, so that sounds great.
    Thank you again for responding!

    Can i ask one more thing though, at what point did you realize you liked architecture so much? Because right now, as much as i really like the idea of it, I'm not sure i have that passion for it.
    Thanks.
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    (Original post by Sketch26)
    Wow, you seem like you really love it! I get what you're saying and the traveling thing sounds amazing to me, I've always intended on travelling at some point, so that sounds great.
    Thank you again for responding!

    Can i ask one more thing though, at what point did you realize you liked architecture so much? Because right now, as much as i really like the idea of it, I'm not sure i have that passion for it.
    Thanks.
    Frankly speaking, architecture wasn't the first on my 'dream job' list, it was in fact interior design which probably doesn't sound far apart but in reality there's a massive difference. I chose architecture over interior design because I can always specialise in interior design whenever I want but not vice versa. At first, as I said I had a breakdown almost everyday, but soon I started to find the subject more and more interesting until it got to the point where we started our module in Technology about sustainability where I discovered that architects don't just create buildings but their role is vital for the world.

    It's probably the feeling medic students have when they feel like they can save people's lives but here in architecture I feel like I can use my knowledge to make a different to society in terms of shaping one's life. I'm confident to say I'm not obsessed with architecture, although some of my friends are but I feel like there are so many opportunities out there waiting for me int the future where I won't ever achieve if I did interior design. And also I try to base my opinion on reality, 50% I have to like it and 50% it has to lead me to a good path, so I guess with these two combined I start to feel happy about my course.

    Although, I'd probably be much much energetic and obsessed if I were doing interior or fashion or graphics (I like all of them) but I won't feel as secure as doing this. So yeah, now that I'm 20 I started to understand that sometimes you don't have to be overly obsessed or extremely passionate about something to do it as there are many elements that make up a perfect degree/career choice.

    So in your case, I totally understand because when I was choosing the right course for university it was the toughest decision in life. It's crazy to think about how the 5 choices on UCAS could determine your future. So I'd suggest some fun exercise to do, get a piece of paper and write down all the courses that interest you. Then write pros and cons for each one. Follow by what you are good and not good at. And end by where do you see yourself in 5-10 years time. Having done this 2 years ago it left me with 3 choices, so I decided to visit open days at a few universities and looked at the courses in depth.

    I wish you luck in choosing the right path for the future and do not hesitate if you have any more questions, I'm more than happy to answer because I know it's not easy to be in your position
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    (Original post by Indiestreet)
    Frankly speaking, architecture wasn't the first on my 'dream job' list, it was in fact interior design which probably doesn't sound far apart but in reality there's a massive difference. I chose architecture over interior design because I can always specialise in interior design whenever I want but not vice versa. At first, as I said I had a breakdown almost everyday, but soon I started to find the subject more and more interesting until it got to the point where we started our module in Technology about sustainability where I discovered that architects don't just create buildings but their role is vital for the world.

    It's probably the feeling medic students have when they feel like they can save people's lives but here in architecture I feel like I can use my knowledge to make a different to society in terms of shaping one's life. I'm confident to say I'm not obsessed with architecture, although some of my friends are but I feel like there are so many opportunities out there waiting for me int the future where I won't ever achieve if I did interior design. And also I try to base my opinion on reality, 50% I have to like it and 50% it has to lead me to a good path, so I guess with these two combined I start to feel happy about my course.

    Although, I'd probably be much much energetic and obsessed if I were doing interior or fashion or graphics (I like all of them) but I won't feel as secure as doing this. So yeah, now that I'm 20 I started to understand that sometimes you don't have to be overly obsessed or extremely passionate about something to do it as there are many elements that make up a perfect degree/career choice.

    So in your case, I totally understand because when I was choosing the right course for university it was the toughest decision in life. It's crazy to think about how the 5 choices on UCAS could determine your future. So I'd suggest some fun exercise to do, get a piece of paper and write down all the courses that interest you. Then write pros and cons for each one. Follow by what you are good and not good at. And end by where do you see yourself in 5-10 years time. Having done this 2 years ago it left me with 3 choices, so I decided to visit open days at a few universities and looked at the courses in depth.

    I wish you luck in choosing the right path for the future and do not hesitate if you have any more questions, I'm more than happy to answer because I know it's not easy to be in your position
    Thank you for another fantastic response! It's comforting to know that it's not something that you have to be instantly sure about/be obsessed with it for it to be a good idea. I also like the idea that what i could be doing would actually be important and making a difference like you said.
    And yeah it is very daunting, but I really am excited for it too. Thank you for the advice, i'll definitely try that!
    I'm really grateful for your advise and everything you've said, you've been a massive help!! If I do have any other queries i'll be sure to ask if that's okay!
    Thanks again
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    My advice would be that if you have the motivation and skills to do a different career, then avoid architecture. In my experience from working in practice for a few years now, you basically don't get any creative freedom at all until you're at a pretty senior level, but even then you don't really because everything is controlled by contractors/clients/budget etc. But even if you were somehow in a position to have total design freedom you're still only going to spend 5% of your time designing, the rest of your time will be spent on glorified admin tasks and bureaucracy. In essence the degree will be enjoyable if totally time consuming and pretty indulgent, and life after your degree will be as boring as any other office job, just with less pay and longer hours. Enjoy.
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    (Original post by Indiestreet)
    At first, as I said I had a breakdown almost everyday, but soon I started to find the subject more and more interesting until it got to the point where we started our module in Technology about sustainability where I discovered that architects don't just create buildings but their role is vital for the world.
    I suspect you won't be feeling so vital after a few months in practice
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    (Original post by Farchitect)
    My advice would be that if you have the motivation and skills to do a different career, then avoid architecture. In my experience from working in practice for a few years now, you basically don't get any creative freedom at all until you're at a pretty senior level, but even then you don't really because everything is controlled by contractors/clients/budget etc. But even if you were somehow in a position to have total design freedom you're still only going to spend 5% of your time designing, the rest of your time will be spent on glorified admin tasks and bureaucracy. In essence the degree will be enjoyable if totally time consuming and pretty indulgent, and life after your degree will be as boring as any other office job, just with less pay and longer hours. Enjoy.
    Thank you for your honesty, it's a shame that the actual work is as mundane as any other job because the uni course sounds great.
    Thanks again
 
 
 
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