I don't understand the statement given on Jane Eyre :(

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chocolatesauce
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'Jane Eyre' plays with the Gothic conventions in self conscious and skeptical ways, evoking Gothic possibilities only to undercut them and then finding 'in the plain truth'. She presents realities more threatening than the most fantastic fears.

,Margaret Homans

To what extent do you agree with this statement?

I don't understand what the statement is saying, if anyone could break it down to me it would be amazing. Thank you!
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mrsmeeseeks
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I THINK an example of the point Homans is trying to get across here is that throughout the novel, gothic themes such as the supernatural are prevalent (e.g. red room, presence of an unknown in Thornfield). This could seem to foreshadow something like a ghost appearing, yet she then 'undercuts' this by introducing Bertha and providing an explanation of what is going on. Not 100% sure on this but I hope it's helpful
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chocolatesauce
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(Original post by mrsmeeseeks)
I THINK an example of the point Homans is trying to get across here is that throughout the novel, gothic themes such as the supernatural are prevalent (e.g. red room, presence of an unknown in Thornfield). This could seem to foreshadow something like a ghost appearing, yet she then 'undercuts' this by introducing Bertha and providing an explanation of what is going on. Not 100% sure on this but I hope it's helpful
thank you so much!
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somemightsay888
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There's a fair bit of gothic imagery in Jane Eyre. The Red Room, Thornfield Hall having these gothic passages it the book, various foreshadowing (The whole tree breaking and all that) etc. You probably can name more.

Most of these are presented in a supernatural way, instead of the reality;New quote in Weird things only you do?From SoDoneWithSchool; 1 minute ago

E.g Thornfield Hall has that passage drawing similarities with Bluebeards castle.

In reality it's worse; her friend dies, she's humiliated and has a rough time there.

Bertha Mason presented as some phantom according to Jane.

In reality, she's a woman driven insane by Rochester (Although not chiefly). So the dude she thinks is all great isn't so great, the person she trusts the most.

The latter is worse to her than the former, the vivid description of her waking up to her dead friend for example, the descriptive passage. Have a look at that.


To be honest, "self conscious" and "skeptical" just seem a bit out of place in this quote, it's a poor question. I did Jane Eyre for AS too, our questions were better.
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