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Correct way to take corners? Watch

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    Ok so I might sound dumb but for some reason I can either do it right, or I either make the car jerk and I don't know why. I change down the gear before I reach the junction but I make the car jerk? Am I bringing the clutch up too fast? How slow should it be coming up because then I find I coast round the corner. Again, I either do it right or wrong lol. Funny I don't do this in my Peugeot 206 but I do in my instructors car ._.
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    Like you said, you maybe bringing the clutch up too fast if you're switching between cars. When I take a corner I brake gently, move down to second, allow my car's wing mirror to line up with the middle of the road I'm turning into and move my hands around the wheel to turn it. A lot of it is just practice as well
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    (Original post by Blondie987)
    Like you said, you maybe bringing the clutch up too fast if you're switching between cars. When I take a corner I brake gently, move down to second, allow my car's wing mirror to line up with the middle of the road I'm turning into and move my hands around the wheel to turn it. A lot of it is just practice as well
    I see, and how do you bring the clutch up? In one smooth movement?
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    (Original post by mrpopodopalaus)
    I see, and how do you bring the clutch up? In one smooth movement?
    As I'm braking I put the clutch down to move into second gear then bring it up gradually as I approach the point at which in going to turn
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    (Original post by Blondie987)
    As I'm braking I put the clutch down to move into second gear then bring it up gradually as I approach the point at which in going to turn
    Thanks! That might be my issue, I have a tendency to bring up fast but that's because when I change up I do that and have no issue. Practice makes perfect
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    (Original post by mrpopodopalaus)
    Thanks! That might be my issue, I have a tendency to bring up fast but that's because when I change up I do that and have no issue. Practice makes perfect
    No problem, good luck with your test!
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    Possibly not going slow enough when changing down? Hard to tell.
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    (Original post by Talon)
    Possibly not going slow enough when changing down? Hard to tell.
    No I don't think so, although maybe happened once or twice, but I usually slow down to 10-15? So that I'm cornering at around 5-10? What my instructor told me.
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    put some curl on it and aim for the penalty spot
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    As fast as you can.

    Seriously though, the jerking is from your clutch. It is when you bring the two plates together and the one connected to the engine is spinning slower than the wheels so the wheels suddenly slow down to match the rotation of the engine plate. The trick is to find the point where the plates just bite and then match the speeds so there isn't a sudden change in speed.

    It takes time to get used to the bite point.
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    I'mnot sure about it.
    I
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    Ask your instructor, how much do you pay him?
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    (Original post by mrpopodopalaus)
    No I don't think so, although maybe happened once or twice, but I usually slow down to 10-15? So that I'm cornering at around 5-10? What my instructor told me.
    The jerk normally comes from going too fast when changing down though mate, if you're not going fast enough the engine normally grumbles a bit as opposed to jerking. Yeah, though, lifting the clutch slower will help drag the speed down to the engine speed without jerking, not nice for the clutch though but it's only your instructor's car

    As for the procedure for taking a corner:

    Position yourself correctly
    Brake to reach desired speed
    Change gear as appropriate
    Use the accelerator to maintain the same speed for stability

    In general you'd start the corner wide, come to the inside of the corner at the mid-point and exit wide again. This is called apexing and again helps the stability by taking the narrowest angle.
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    I bring it down to 2nd, and move left or right of the junction. If I am in my car, I will leave it in first, then pull off slowly, if I am in my van I will leave it in second and give it higher revs and pull off slowly as well.
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    (Original post by mrpopodopalaus)
    Ok so I might sound dumb but for some reason I can either do it right, or I either make the car jerk and I don't know why. I change down the gear before I reach the junction but I make the car jerk? Am I bringing the clutch up too fast? How slow should it be coming up because then I find I coast round the corner. Again, I either do it right or wrong lol. Funny I don't do this in my Peugeot 206 but I do in my instructors car ._.
    Braking Point
    Apex
    Accelerate.

    Swing the car out wide, using all of the road. Brake hard, then ease off slowly.
    With the foot off the brake pedal, turn the corner, aiming for the apex.
    After the corner, swing out wide again. This is the fastest route, known as the racing line.
    Once the cornering is complete, you may accelerate. You shouldn't accelerate before, since this could cause over-steer.
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    (Original post by Kyx)
    Braking Point
    Apex
    Accelerate.

    Swing the car out wide, using all of the road. Brake hard, then ease off slowly.
    With the foot off the brake pedal, turn the corner, aiming for the apex.
    After the corner, swing out wide again. This is the fastest route, known as the racing line.
    Once the cornering is complete, you may accelerate. You shouldn't accelerate before, since this could cause over-steer.
    Let's not get him stopped for dangerous driving by the police before he has passed his test...
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    (Original post by Talon)
    Let's not get him stopped for dangerous driving by the police before he has passed his test...
    Oh. I thought he was talking about track racing...

    Guess that's what you get for not reading the OP...
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    (Original post by Talon)
    Let's not get him stopped for dangerous driving by the police before he has passed his test...
    *she ahahah this made me laugh :P
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    (Original post by Kyx)
    Oh. I thought he was talking about track racing...

    Guess that's what you get for not reading the OP...
    It's cool Learn something new everyday
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    The jerk normally comes from going too fast when changing down though mate, if you're not going fast enough the engine normally grumbles a bit as opposed to jerking. Yeah, though, lifting the clutch slower will help drag the speed down to the engine speed without jerking, not nice for the clutch though but it's only your instructor's car

    As for the procedure for taking a corner:

    Position yourself correctly
    Brake to reach desired speed
    Change gear as appropriate
    Use the accelerator to maintain the same speed for stability

    In general you'd start the corner wide, come to the inside of the corner at the mid-point and exit wide again. This is called apexing and again helps the stability by taking the narrowest angle.
    Ah cheers!
 
 
 
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