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Pet Insurance Excess Clarification! Watch

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    Hi.

    I've recently become the owner of a rabbit, and am considering getting pet insurance to cover any vet fees which it might incur. The rabbit is a netherland dwarf, no large ears, and it will be kept indoors in a safe area, so I don't imagine it'll get hurt or sick.

    My question is about the excess - most of the cover I can see have a £50 excess per claim.

    Now, vet fee consultations are usually only around £20 - £30 a time. How would the excess work with this in mind? Would I just be reimbursed the consultation fee which I paid, and pay excess only if it's a long-standing/expensive treatment?

    This is my first pet, please guide me well!
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    (Original post by Kagutsuchi)
    Hi.

    I've recently become the owner of a rabbit, and am considering getting pet insurance to cover any vet fees which it might incur. The rabbit is a netherland dwarf, no large ears, and it will be kept indoors in a safe area, so I don't imagine it'll get hurt or sick.

    My question is about the excess - most of the cover I can see have a £50 excess per claim.

    Now, vet fee consultations are usually only around £20 - £30 a time. How would the excess work with this in mind? Would I just be reimbursed the consultation fee which I paid, and pay excess only if it's a long-standing/expensive treatment?

    This is my first pet, please guide me well!

    An example: When your bun gets poorly, you'll see the vet (£30), get some medicine (£25), see the vet for a follow up (£30). This is then £85 of which you're expected to pay the first £50 (the excess).

    You can only claim when your bill is greater than the excess as you're expected to pay that first part yourself. I personally don't bother with smaller claims like that as it pushes the price of your insurance up every time you claim for the sake of £35 in the example. When this pushes your insurance up by £5 a month, it only takes less than a year for you to be worse off.

    My cat tore a ligament in his knee (once, and then again in the other leg >.> ). His total bill was £6000 (each time!!!), and we paid the first £25 which was our excess and they paid the rest.

    Some insurers have a maximum amount per claim, so they'll only pay out £5000 a year or per injury/illness for example. The amount varies a lot. If your bill is more than what they'll pay, you have to pay the rest. If you bun gets sick and needs medicine for the rest of their life, unless you have "lifetime" insurance (usually slightly more expensive), they will pay for the medicine with a specified pot of money until that pot runs out. How big this pot is will vary with your insurance company. Then it is your responsibility again.

    Lifetime insurance means as long as you keep paying your insurance they'll pay for your buns treatment.
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    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    An example: When your bun gets poorly, you'll see the vet (£30), get some medicine (£25), see the vet for a follow up (£30). This is then £85 of which you're expected to pay the first £50 (the excess).

    You can only claim when your bill is greater than the excess as you're expected to pay that first part yourself. I personally don't bother with smaller claims like that as it pushes the price of your insurance up every time you claim for the sake of £35 in the example. When this pushes your insurance up by £5 a month, it only takes less than a year for you to be worse off.

    My cat tore a ligament in his knee (once, and then again in the other leg >.> ). His total bill was £6000 (each time!!!), and we paid the first £25 which was our excess and they paid the rest.

    Some insurers have a maximum amount per claim, so they'll only pay out £5000 a year or per injury/illness for example. The amount varies a lot. If your bill is more than what they'll pay, you have to pay the rest. If you bun gets sick and needs medicine for the rest of their life, unless you have "lifetime" insurance (usually slightly more expensive), they will pay for the medicine with a specified pot of money until that pot runs out. How big this pot is will vary with your insurance company. Then it is your responsibility again.

    Lifetime insurance means as long as you keep paying your insurance they'll pay for your buns treatment.
    Unlucky with your cats cruciate, its very common in dogs but uncommon in cats!

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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    Unlucky with your cats cruciate, its very common in dogs but uncommon in cats!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thats what the vet said. So uncommon, they gave him a repair that they use in dogs all the way up to great danes because they didnt have a smaller one.

    And the 2nd time he managed to escape his cage and jump just after surgery ripping it out and requiring them to do it again -_-

    Mogs. Gotta love em though.
 
 
 
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