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    I'm stuck between Maths and French for my fourth option.
    French is more favourable because I like it more, but then I'd be doing 4 written subjects.
    Maths is a facilitating subject.
    What should I take?
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    (Original post by hxfsxh)
    I'm stuck between Maths and French for my fourth option.
    French is more favourable because I like it more, but then I'd be doing 4 written subjects.
    Maths is a facilitating subject.
    What should I take?
    Do what you enjoy the most and what you think would prove more fruitful for your later plans. Don't just take maths because it is a facilitating subject - although this is true, if you don't enjoy it, you're unlikely to do as well as you would in a subject you did enjoy.

    French is also a well respected subject, as are all modern languages at A Level.

    I would just say, do what you enjoy the most. That is what A Levels should be about - picking subjects you enjoy and want to explore further
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    French
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    Maths is better in terms of the options it gives, and how it looks when you apply to university or anything after a levels.

    However if you don't enjoy it, chances are you wont do too well anyway. I also wouldn't recommend taking it if you got anything below an A at GCSE maths (though getting an A* is still preferable)
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    (Original post by Nadile)
    Maths is better in terms of the options it gives, and how it looks when you apply to university or anything after a levels.

    However if you don't enjoy it, chances are you wont do too well anyway. I also wouldn't recommend taking it if you got anything below an A at GCSE maths (though getting an A* is still preferable)
    I'm taking History, Economics and Politics too- French fits in ideally because I want to do law and thus languages are respected, but Maths shows that I have a breadth of skills.
    I'd say I'm equally as good in both subjects.
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    Go for French, maths is really difficult especially if you don't enjoy it that much. I did maths and a language and ended up dropping the maths because I didn't like it enough and struggled. You're always better off doing what you enjoy more.


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    (Original post by hxfsxh)
    I'm stuck between Maths and French for my fourth option.
    French is more favourable because I like it more, but then I'd be doing 4 written subjects.
    Maths is a facilitating subject.
    What should I take?
    As a fourth subject it is an "extra", so to speak. Go for what you enjoy more - even if it is yet another "written" subject, the workload will seem considerably less than if you're doing a subject you don't really enjoy, and you'll probably get a better grade in it. And don't forget that, beyond university, future employers will respect that A level in French.
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    If you're already doing three other humanities (I presume this is the case) then you won't need maths for whatever you plan to do at university, I shouldn't think. Also, French and other modern languages are also 'facilitating subjects' (although even if this were not the case, they don't mean a great deal for the most part). If you think you'll prefer French and you'll do well at it at A level, I'd say go for that. Languages are a good skill to have, and a skill sorely lacking in this country for the most part!
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    (Original post by SosbanFach)
    If you're already doing three other humanities (I presume this is the case) then you won't need maths for whatever you plan to do at university, I shouldn't think. Also, French and other modern languages are also 'facilitating subjects' (although even if this were not the case, they don't mean a great deal for the most part). If you think you'll prefer French and you'll do well at it at A level, I'd say go for that. Languages are a good skill to have, and a skill sorely lacking in this country for the most part!
    I speak 3 languages anyway, so Its not likely to be difficult Thanks for your input
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    (Original post by Anna Schoon)
    As a fourth subject it is an "extra", so to speak. Go for what you enjoy more - even if it is yet another "written" subject, the workload will seem considerably less than if you're doing a subject you don't really enjoy, and you'll probably get a better grade in it. And don't forget that, beyond university, future employers will respect that A level in French.
    I hadn't considered that point before; thanks for your input
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    What are your other subjects?
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    (Original post by ♥Samantha♥)
    What are your other subjects?
    History, Economics and Politics. I'm taking an EPQ too as an extra enrichment opportunity.
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    (Original post by Anna Schoon)
    And don't forget that, beyond university, future employers will respect that A level in French.
    True - but not as much as respecting Maths for probably the vast majority of employers. Unless an employer is dealing with French customers then they really aren't going to care about it - almost all employers care about Maths.
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    I'm currently doing French,Pyschology,English Literature and Textiles. I speak 3 languages just like you do and I must say I'm glad that I chose French, just like the others said it's a well respected A level and you get to enhance your spoken,written and grammar skills at an expert level meaning doing French at A level will benefit you in the future but so would Maths therefore follow your heart, get advice from your mom and dad Personally I want a career in fashion so french fits in greatly with what I want to do The fact that you want to do law in Uni would give you more flexibility to work or even do an internship in other nations. You don't do as much writing as you think you would at A level, the most writing we do is during the written section, which is when you write a 200-220 word essay on a topic, the listening and reading is just answering questions in FRENCH or in english sometimes. I hope I helped you out a bit xx
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    (Original post by lig1729)
    True - but not as much as respecting Maths for probably the vast majority of employers. Unless an employer is dealing with French customers then they really aren't going to care about it - almost all employers care about Maths.
    Actually...

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/the-f...n-a-universit/

    I quote a particularly relevant bit: "bilinguality also shows focus, determination and will improve your ability to multitask and remember". It's not only about communicating with French customers!
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    (Original post by Anna Schoon)
    Actually...

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/the-f...n-a-universit/

    I quote a particularly relevant bit: "bilinguality also shows focus, determination and will improve your ability to multitask and remember". It's not only about communicating with French customers!
    And the vast majority of employers don't use such criteria. They'll think - French, that's nice but of no applicability whatsoever to my business - Maths, right, I know this person isn't innumerate. I know you've probably never run a business - I have - and I am going to ignore foreign languages before I am going to ignore maths unless my business needs the language.
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    (Original post by lig1729)
    And the vast majority of employers don't use such criteria. They'll think - French, that's nice but of no applicability whatsoever to my business - Maths, right, I know this person isn't innumerate. I know you've probably never run a business - I have - and I am going to ignore foreign languages before I am going to ignore maths unless my business needs the language.
    Well, I've run my own business for 27 years so I think I now what I'm talking about. :lol:

    Of course I need to be numerate for accounting purposes - the tax authorities would soon put me out of business if I didn't get that side of things right. But the only Maths I ever need was more than covered by what was then an "O" level in Maths - the equivalent to a modern-day GCSE. And even then, the only mathematical skills I use on an everyday basis are basic arithmetic (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division), fractions and percentages. I use calculating volumes sometimes in cookery, but not for my business.

    My son has just graduated with a degree in Aerospace engineering and was given two job offers within days of receiving his result - because he speaks fluent French and this gave him the edge over other the candidates.

    I don't know if you followed the link I posted to the article in the newspaper? We're looking at huge companies here who are actually saying that they are looking for language skills and experience over and above qualifications - quite a sea change. With more and more graduates on the job market, job seekers need to show a wider range of skills than ever before. The OP wants to study Law: I suspect that, for her, French might just prove to be a more valuable skill than differentiation and integration.
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    (Original post by Anna Schoon)
    Well, I've run my own business for 27 years so I think I now what I'm talking about. :lol:

    Of course I need to be numerate for accounting purposes - the tax authorities would soon put me out of business if I didn't get that side of things right. But the only Maths I ever need was more than covered by what was then an "O" level in Maths - the equivalent to a modern-day GCSE. And even then, the only mathematical skills I use on an everyday basis are basic arithmetic (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division), fractions and percentages. I use calculating volumes sometimes in cookery, but not for my business.

    My son has just graduated with a degree in Aerospace engineering and was given two job offers within days of receiving his result - because he speaks fluent French and this gave him the edge over other the candidates.

    I don't know if you followed the link I posted to the article in the newspaper? We're looking at huge companies here who are actually saying that they are looking for language skills and experience over and above qualifications - quite a sea change. With more and more graduates on the job market, job seekers need to show a wider range of skills than ever before. The OP wants to study Law: I suspect that, for her, French might just prove to be a more valuable skill than differentiation and integration.
    I am not saying languages aren't important but compared to maths for most businesses they are not. And see how far your son would have got in Aerospace Engineering without the maths. The French is an embellishment - the maths a necessity.
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    (Original post by hxfsxh)
    I'm stuck between Maths and French for my fourth option.
    French is more favourable because I like it more, but then I'd be doing 4 written subjects.
    Maths is a facilitating subject.
    What should I take?
    Both Maths and French are facilitating subjects.

    That term came from a Russell Group publication: http://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media/...ces-latest.pdf

    Some advanced level subjects are more frequently required for entry to degree courses than others. We call these subjects ‘facilitating’ because choosing them at advanced level leaves open a wide range of options for university study. These facilitating subjects are:
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • English literature
    • Geography
    • History
    • Physics
    • Modern and classical languages
    • Maths and further maths
    And the only reason these are listed is that they give you more flexibility in choices of degrees - they're not "better" subjects, especially if you know what you want to study.

    http://university.which.co.uk/advice...d-to-study-law has more information on the sorts of A levels people studying law take (mainly essay based, english and history top of the list and both French and Maths listed as "also popular".) there's similar articles for other subjects on that site.

    Pick the subject you think you'll do well at (although bear in mind it is statistically MUCH tougher to get an A in languages than in maths. You're competing against native speakers for the top grades and standards are tougher - only 8% of people got an A* in French compared to 18% in Maths last year http://www.bstubbs.co.uk/a-lev.htm ) and that you'll enjoy the most.
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    Do you have an idea of what you want to do at university?
 
 
 
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