ha.anon90
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Ive been revising this since yesterday i dont understand reduction, oxidation, process if blast furnace.. Ores.. Its o difficult. Cast iron...
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charco
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(Original post by Habina786xx)
Ive been revising this since yesterday i dont understand reduction, oxidation, process if blast furnace.. Ores.. Its o difficult. Cast iron...
You are going to have to be a lot more specific about your problems if you need help in a particular topic ...
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ha.anon90
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(Original post by charco)
You are going to have to be a lot more specific about your problems if you need help in a particular topic ...
Even i dont understand it myself.
Its mostly ores.. Reduction by carbon,.. Electrolysis.

Iron extracted using a blast furnace...
Cast iron produced.

Extracting copper.
Thats it really


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charco
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(Original post by Habina786xx)
Even i dont understand it myself.
Its mostly ores.. Reduction by carbon,.. Electrolysis.

Iron extracted using a blast furnace...
Cast iron produced.

Extracting copper.
Thats it really


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Metals occur in the form of compounds in rocks - these are called ores.

Iron ore = rock containing iron compounds to a reasonable high percentage

To get the metals out of the ores they must be:
1. Mined
2. Processed
3. Chemically extracted (reduced)
4. Purified

With iron the chemical extraction takes place in a large furnace, called a blast furnace.

In the blast furnace the hot iron oxide reacts with carbon monoxide to make iron. The iron changes from an ion in the compound to a pure element. This is called 'reduction' as electrons are being added to the iron ions.

The hot molten iron is poured into containers called 'pigs' and said to be 'cast iron' or 'pig iron' at this stage. It contains a lot of carbon impurity from the furnace.

Check out this animation of the process
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ha.anon90
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(Original post by charco)
Metals occur in the form of compounds in rocks - these are called ores.

Iron ore = rock containing iron compounds to a reasonable high percentage

To get the metals out of the ores they must be:
1. Mined
2. Processed
3. Chemically extracted (reduced)
4. Purified

With iron the chemical extraction takes place in a large furnace, called a blast furnace.

In the blast furnace the hot iron oxide reacts with carbon monoxide to make iron. The iron changes from an ion in the compound to a pure element. This is called 'reduction' as electrons are being added to the iron ions.

The hot molten iron is poured into containers called 'pigs' and said to be 'cast iron' or 'pig iron' at this stage. It contains a lot of carbon impurity from the furnace.

Check out this animation of the process
Thank youu!!! X what about this question? Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1454263535.878174.jpg
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charco
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(Original post by Habina786xx)
Thank youu!!! X what about this question? Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1454263535.878174.jpg
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Alkanes are made of only carbon atoms, hydrogen atoms and single bonds.

Because of this, every alkane has the same proportion of carbon to hydrogen.

This allows alkanes to be expressed as a general formula:

CnH(2n+2)

where 'n' is an integer

So the formula given, C5H12 is when 'n' = 5
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Stevenson Dude
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I just found this channel of yt and it's quite helpful.

I guess these videos will explain it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PD66KzMplnU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oy_sj2jH9fg
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ha.anon90
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(Original post by Stevenson Dude)
I just found this channel of yt and it's quite helpful.

I guess these videos will explain it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PD66KzMplnU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oy_sj2jH9fg
Thank you so much as im still struggling will chk them out after school


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ha.anon90
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(Original post by Habina786xx)
Thank you so much as im still struggling will chk them out after school


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matthewyoung1
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(Original post by Habina786xx)
Ive been revising this since yesterday i dont understand reduction, oxidation, process if blast furnace.. Ores.. Its o difficult. Cast iron...
just draw the diagrams out over and over, most gcse questions show the diagram just with missing labels and the follow up questions are usually just the equations involved!
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honeylooloo
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an easy way to remember reduction and oxidation is by the saying 'OILRIG' oxidation is loss (of electrons) and reduction is gain (of electrons. So when a molecules loses an electron you would say that molecule has become oxidises and when a molecule gains an electron you would say that molecule has become reduced
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ha.anon90
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(Original post by honeylooloo)
an easy way to remember reduction and oxidation is by the saying 'OILRIG' oxidation is loss (of electrons) and reduction is gain (of electrons. So when a molecules loses an electron you would say that molecule has become oxidises and when a molecule gains an electron you would say that molecule has become reduced
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honeylooloo
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try this
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wodyxtv-ngQ
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Jpw1097
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It's C2H4, not C2H6, because you have to balance the equation. There is 10 carbons on the left so you need to 10 carbons on the right. Since there are already 8 on the right, it must be a 2 carbon compound - as you have correctly identified. There are 22 hydrogen on the left but only 18 on the right, therefore you need another 4 hydrogen to balance the equation. Hence the compound is ethane, C2H4.
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ha.anon90
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(Original post by Jpw1097)
It's C2H4, not C2H6, because you have to balance the equation. There is 10 carbons on the left so you need to 10 carbons on the right. Since there are already 8 on the right, it must be a 2 carbon compound - as you have correctly identified. There are 22 hydrogen on the left but only 18 on the right, therefore you need another 4 hydrogen to balance the equation. Hence the compound is ethane, C2H4.
Omg thank you

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ha.anon90
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(Original post by honeylooloo)
an easy way to remember reduction and oxidation is by the saying 'OILRIG' oxidation is loss (of electrons) and reduction is gain (of electrons. So when a molecules loses an electron you would say that molecule has become oxidises and when a molecule gains an electron you would say that molecule has become reduced
Heyy is it okay if you can explain this for me

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honeylooloo
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a monomer is a single unit.
a polymer is that single unit but repeated loads of times.

so for example - a monomer could be a single pearl
but the polymer would be a pearled necklace (loads of those monomers attached together)

So if you wanted to make a polymer out of an alkene(monomer). You would just have to break the c=c double bond and turn it into a c-c single bond and that releases more electrons so you can 'join' them up together
have a look at the annotation here. It easier to visually look at it

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebit...anolrev1.shtml
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