Justcoffeespoons
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I've done some research and it looks like an interesting area to specialise in, but I'm not entirely show how it works. What would a lawyer working in this area do? Also how does it link to EU law? Anything you know would be helpful. I'm in the UK btw.
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Lyrical Prodigy
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(Original post by Justcoffeespoons)
I've done some research and it looks like an interesting area to specialise in, but I'm not entirely show how it works. What would a lawyer working in this area do? Also how does it link to EU law? Anything you know would be helpful. I'm in the UK btw.
Ahhh, it's nearly 2am at the time of writing this so let me see if my brain still functions properly

When doing constitutional law last year, I do recall my lecturer briefly speaking about the roles of a constitutional lawyer. I believe it's very government based, perhaps you'd be working closely with politicians. You'd be expected to advise on legal matters concerning political issues as such (if this makes sense). For me, studying Consitutional (and administrative) law seemed quite philosophical, many references were made to Lord Bingham and Lord Denning.

A constitutional lawyer also helps one understand their rights as a citizen and tries to resolve any dispute involving an individual against a government etc.

It will all inevitably link to EU matters, simply because (as EU law holds supremacy in international matters) the UK will have to delegate and interact with other member states frequently.

Try looking at this link:
https://www.rocketlawyer.com/article...onal-lawyer.rl

And this:
http://www.allaboutlaw.co.uk/stage/a...nistrative-law

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Justcoffeespoons
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(Original post by Lyrical Prodigy)
Ahhh, it's nearly 2am at the time of writing this so let me see if my brain still functions properly

When doing constitutional law last year, I do recall my lecturer briefly speaking about the roles of a constitutional lawyer. I believe it's very government based, perhaps you'd be working closely with politicians. You'd be expected to advise on legal matters concerning political issues as such (if this makes sense). For me, studying Consitutional (and administrative) law seemed quite philosophical, many references were made to Lord Bingham and Lord Denning.

A constitutional lawyer also helps one understand their rights as a citizen and tries to resolve any dispute involving an individual against a government etc.

It will all inevitably link to EU matters, simply because (as EU law holds supremacy in international matters) the UK will have to delegate and interact with other member states frequently.

Try looking at this link:
https://www.rocketlawyer.com/article...onal-lawyer.rl

And this:
http://www.allaboutlaw.co.uk/stage/a...nistrative-law

Thanks you soo much, you did a pretty good job for 2am
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Audrey18
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(Original post by Lyrical Prodigy)
Ahhh, it's nearly 2am at the time of writing this so let me see if my brain still functions properly

When doing constitutional law last year, I do recall my lecturer briefly speaking about the roles of a constitutional lawyer. I believe it's very government based, perhaps you'd be working closely with politicians. You'd be expected to advise on legal matters concerning political issues as such (if this makes sense). For me, studying Consitutional (and administrative) law seemed quite philosophical, many references were made to Lord Bingham and Lord Denning.

A constitutional lawyer also helps one understand their rights as a citizen and tries to resolve any dispute involving an individual against a government etc.

It will all inevitably link to EU matters, simply because (as EU law holds supremacy in international matters) the UK will have to delegate and interact with other member states frequently.

Try looking at this link:
https://www.rocketlawyer.com/article...onal-lawyer.rl

And this:
http://www.allaboutlaw.co.uk/stage/a...nistrative-law

hi. what other resources do you have for law? what subjects did you do at A levels and with which boards? thanks.
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Lyrical Prodigy
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(Original post by Audrey18)
hi. what other resources do you have for law? what subjects did you do at A levels and with which boards? thanks.
That depends on what type of resources you're looking for, statutes, cases, journal articles or just general info about the degree?

I'm in second year of university now, at A-level I did English Literature(AQA), psychology (OCR) and Government & Politics (AQA).
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Audrey18
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(Original post by Lyrical Prodigy)
That depends on what type of resources you're looking for, statutes, cases, journal articles or just general info about the degree?

I'm in second year of university now, at A-level I did English Literature(AQA), psychology (OCR) and Government & Politics (AQA).
hi. it'll be nice to have some notes, samples answers etc on contract, english legal system and tort? hows uni so far for you? which uni are you at? is the workload manageable?
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BrokenLife
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Will give a detailed answer tomorrow. Sorry.
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Lyrical Prodigy
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(Original post by Audrey18)
hi. it'll be nice to have some notes, samples answers etc on contract, english legal system and tort? hows uni so far for you? which uni are you at? is the workload manageable?
Go to e-lawresources.co.uk, they provide some basic, useful notes on various areas of the law.

University thus far is fantastic. I'm really looking forward to third year :awesome:
The workload is pretty manageable. Our lecturers and tutors recommend that we do a minimum of 40 hours a week dedicated to doing our readings etc. I won't lie, the workload is incredibly much especially as you progress through the years but it is doable, just make sure you keep on top of everything and take a breather where you can! It's so important to manage your time correctly, and this goes with any subject I suppose but the last thing you want to be doing is letting work get on top of you, that's an uphill battle. Organise your notes and readings and make it easy for you to understand so that by the time it gets to exam season, you'd be merely just recollecting your memory on topics rather than trying to cram in a whole module!
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HarshTiw
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Constitutional law is very interesting as it is the very basis for the functioning of a democratic liberal society, to develop your interest further I would recommend "the Rule of Law" by Tom Bingham. He explains the basics of Constitutional law and the concept of rule of law in lucid and really easy language. Bingham a judicial hero of sorts. EU law is primarily linked to British constitutional Law in the Human rights Act, 1998 which tries to invigorate the European Convention on Human Rights in the British system.

Caution-too much to study but it might be worth it, depending on you
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callum_law
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(Original post by Lyrical Prodigy)
Go to e-lawresources.co.uk, they provide some basic, useful notes on various areas of the law.

University thus far is fantastic. I'm really looking forward to third year :awesome:
The workload is pretty manageable. Our lecturers and tutors recommend that we do a minimum of 40 hours a week dedicated to doing our readings etc. I won't lie, the workload is incredibly much especially as you progress through the years but it is doable, just make sure you keep on top of everything and take a breather where you can! It's so important to manage your time correctly, and this goes with any subject I suppose but the last thing you want to be doing is letting work get on top of you, that's an uphill battle. Organise your notes and readings and make it easy for you to understand so that by the time it gets to exam season, you'd be merely just recollecting your memory on topics rather than trying to cram in a whole module!
Are you joking? You actually do 40 hours of work a week?
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Lyrical Prodigy
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(Original post by callum_law)
Are you joking? You actually do 40 hours of work a week?
Lol it's recommended. They know nobody will hardly do that amount of hours.
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