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Labour have largest polling average deficit within first year of election since 1959! Watch

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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    Imagine the reverse though. Let's say we currently had more elective care at the weekend, and the government was trying to scale it back. The very same medics complaining now, would be furious about the government trying to "cut back the NHS" etc.
    hmmm I'm really not sure that would be the case. You're a medic though aren't you so maybe you have more insight? Have you graduated yet?

    I think if the doctors were providing elective care at the weekend and a system was in place to prevent them being overworked and the situation becoming dangerous for patients, then an attempt to scale it back would be a cut.

    The doctors' issue is not working at weekends. They already do and I don't think they are that angry at the concept. They are angry that it is being imposed and that it isn't considering the implications of stretching an already stretched to the limit workforce without supplying any more doctors.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    But this can't be true!! All of the people commenting on "The Guardian" keep saying that the Tories are absolutely terrified of Corbyn.
    PRSOM :laugh:

    Excellent.
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    I think this is probably necessary - and might in the long run be best for Labour. If Corbyn was only moderately rejected by the electorate at this point - it would mean Corbyn would go into 2020 thinking he had some shot at winning.

    However, at the rate he's going, I doubt he will even lead the party into the 2020 election. If he does, then all the better because it means they'll be completely and utterly annihilated, and the 21st Century 'democratic socialist' reincarnation of the Labour party will be dead and buried. Then those with electable policies will come forward - and after 15 years of Tory rule, people might start to have an appetite for soft-left policies again. Like the Liberals in Canada, who were diminished to 3rd place in 2011 (with a paltry 40 out of about 330 seats in the Canadian parliament) and who now hold a strong majority - it might be that Labour has to be slaughtered in order to truly revitalize the party.

    Whatever political position you hold, it's fairly evident that British people are not going to vote for hard left-wing policies in the near-future. They're also generally wrong about most things, but telling them they are wrong does not win any votes.

    [NB: I support neither party, but I think those Tories getting excited at the prospect of Labour never getting back into power are making a mistake made many, many times before]
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    (Original post by Ethereal World)
    hmmm I'm really not sure that would be the case. You're a medic though aren't you so maybe you have more insight? Have you graduated yet?

    I think if the doctors were providing elective care at the weekend and a system was in place to prevent them being overworked and the situation becoming dangerous for patients, then an attempt to scale it back would be a cut.

    The doctors' issue is not working at weekends. They already do and I don't think they are that angry at the concept. They are angry that it is being imposed and that it isn't considering the implications of stretching an already stretched to the limit workforce without supplying any more doctors.
    There are several simple answers to add to that as well, Hunt doesn't actually understand what he's talking about, its like getting a 6 year old to decide your pay and conditions, I've said before, but if we had some honesty (shrink the public sector, accept the delay in A+E etc.) then I imagine support from docs could still be high, every time however, its work longer, for less, do better, fail less often and save money. Politics, sadly.

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    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    My big concern would be what loses the middle of the road voters. If centrists tolerate the back to work schemes, the privatisation of health service, etc. Then what does a Tory have to do to lose voters? Even Google tax fund probably feels like a win.

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    One has to remember that the UK is not a working class country (yet - lower home ownership could lead us this way in decades to come), it's a middle class country in which the majority of the electorate have their own home, are in their 40's and earning a comfortable if uninspiring wage in the £25-35k range. That is you middle ground floater.

    Far from simply tolerating the welfare schemes, welfare as a whole is actually one of the Tories strongest areas from a polling point of view. Only on specific things like the spare room subsidy does some support come through.

    Privatisation (in this case contracting out services) has not impacted the universality or cost at the point of use. There's no reason for your average joe to care.
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    (Original post by Bulbasaur)

    [NB: I support neither party, but I think those Tories getting excited at the prospect of Labour never getting back into power are making a mistake made many, many times before]
    I should say that despite my current glee in the OP i'm not exceptionally tribal and would have probably voted for Blair in 01 and 05 so the prospect of Labour eventually returning to power is not one that i look down upon so long as extremists like Corbyn are kept out of power and the Tories continue their sane phase.
 
 
 
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