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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    So it's a modified xbox controller?

    The pyrosoft link it's referring to looks pretty much like an xbox controller to me.
    Yeah it's a modified controller, I'll give you that. The UAVs used by the British Army are tiny, and are not like Reapers (which require those control rooms in the image I attached earlier). It's made out of a foam/plastic material and doesn't operate any weapons. I think it's just for surveillance.

    Something as complex as a full size drone would require much more than a USB controller.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Yeah it's a modified controller, I'll give you that. The UAVs used by the British Army are tiny, and are not like Reapers (which require those control rooms in the image I attached earlier). It's made out of a foam/plastic material and doesn't operate any weapons. I think it's just for surveillance.

    Something as complex as a full size drone would require much more than a USB controller.
    So the UAVs operated by the Army are not like the ones we operate? You do realise that we operate reapers?

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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    So the UAVs operated by the Army are not like the ones we operate? You do realise that we operate reapers?

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    The RAF operate Reapers, the Army (at least I think they still do) operate Desert Hawks.

    The Armys flying branch (Army Air Corps) do not hire drone pilots. I believe their mini drones are operated by the Royal Artillery.

    The Royal Air Force directly hire drone pilots as a seperate role to pilot.

    Desert Hawks are tiny, they weigh like...3kg? Reapers require a crew of 2 people to operate and weigh about 2 tonnes.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Yeah it's a modified controller, I'll give you that. The UAVs used by the British Army are tiny, and are not like Reapers (which require those control rooms in the image I attached earlier). It's made out of a foam/plastic material and doesn't operate any weapons. I think it's just for surveillance.

    Something as complex as a full size drone would require much more than a USB controller.
    Is semantics is what it is.


    To all intents and purposes, the Army's Desert Hawk is controlled by an Xbox controller.

    Yes, bigger ones require more elaborate controls, but that's generally the case with everything. Don't know why you felt you had to make such a distinction.
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    A few years ago they actually used CoD to recruit snipers.

    Obvs not the 360 no scope types
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    The RAF operate Reapers, the Army (at least I think they still do) operate Desert Hawks.

    The Armys flying branch (Army Air Corps) do not hire drone pilots. I believe their mini drones are operated by the Royal Artillery.

    The Royal Air Force directly hire drone pilots as a seperate role to pilot.

    Desert Hawks are tiny, they weigh like...3kg? Reapers require a crew of 2 people to operate and weigh about 2 tonnes.
    The Army also has Watchkeeper. That will require proper teams.

    And the RAF has only recently started that, there are no an initio RPS pilots in service, to the best of my knowledge. All those serving currently are formally trained pilots.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Is semantics is what it is.


    To all intents and purposes, the Army's Desert Hawk is controlled by an Xbox controller.

    Yes, bigger ones require more elaborate controls, but that's generally the case with everything. Don't know why you felt you had to make such a distinction.
    The links he sent had an official reply from the Army who made the clarification, I was merely repeating it as he might not of read through the links he posted.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Yeah it's a modified controller, I'll give you that. The UAVs used by the British Army are tiny, and are not like Reapers (which require those control rooms in the image I attached earlier). It's made out of a foam/plastic material and doesn't operate any weapons. I think it's just for surveillance.

    Something as complex as a full size drone would require much more than a USB controller.
    Could the full size drones not theoretically be controlled by a two man team, gunner and pilot, of which the gunner could potentially (no idea if it's actually the case, and whether [modified] xbox controllers are used is probably classified) be using an xbox controller? For the gunner (not necessarily the pilot) an xbox controller seems just as suitable for the job as a joystick.
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    Could the full size drones not theoretically be controlled by a two man team, gunner and pilot, of which the gunner could potentially (no idea if it's actually the case, and whether [modified] xbox controllers are used is probably classified) be using an xbox controller? For the gunner (not necessarily the pilot) an xbox controller seems just as suitable for the job as a joystick.
    I don't think it's split into gunner/pilot like an Army Air Corps Apache, but I'm unsure. Whilst there are two people responsible for the actual handling of the drone, there's a whole team of people involved (as there is with any aircraft). I don't know how it's delegated.

    Drewski will know.
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    Could the full size drones not theoretically be controlled by a two man team, gunner and pilot, of which the gunner could potentially (no idea if it's actually the case, and whether [modified] xbox controllers are used is probably classified) be using an xbox controller? For the gunner (not necessarily the pilot) an xbox controller seems just as suitable for the job as a joystick.
    In theory.

    But it would be counter intuitive as current training regimes have them taught how to fly traditionally. Over complicating things would be pointless.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    In theory.

    But it would be counter intuitive as current training regimes have them taught how to fly traditionally. Over complicating things would be pointless.
    Cool, thanks
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    In theory.

    But it would be counter intuitive as current training regimes have them taught how to fly traditionally. Over complicating things would be pointless.
    EFT or something along those lines?
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    Main stream titles no, but specialised simulations are useful.

    Take air flight simulators and naval simulators used in the airforce and navy. Take driving simulators used by Formula 1 drivers.

    COD, no. One produced by the MoD, yes.
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    (Original post by serah.exe)
    Well in some cases, video games could help you in real life situations. Like driving games (using the steering wheel) made me amazing at actually steering a car. :rofl:
    Yes that is true because they had people become professional racing drivers from playing a Gran Turismo and the best got selected to go to the GT Academy where the winner gets a pro contract.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    EFT or something along those lines?
    For those about to be recruited, yes - a modified version at least.

    Almost, if not all, those currently flying are all 'proper' pilots.
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    (Original post by Supersaps)
    How is your RSM only a WO2?


    SS

    Edit: Oh, you're a cadet. I'll turn walt-hunter mode off...
    Even in the cadets, an RSM would wear the rank badge of WO1.
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    (Original post by Foo.mp3)
    Compared to whom!? :erm:
    Well the British armed forces for example

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    (Original post by Andy98)
    Well the British armed forces for example
    We have the advantage of having a smaller, tighter knit, and better (historically) established army/navy, and a societal history/tradition of better discipline/natural predisposition toward hierarchy and related class structures. We also have the advantage of not being expected to play 'World Police' in the modern era. It's unsurprising, then, that our armed forces are generally viewed as being more professional + ours are arguably the most professional/effective in the world so to say the US isn't quite up to the same standard isn't necessarily a damning indictment. Some US army personnel are absolute cowboys, for sure, but I have it on good information that many are pretty decent soldiers, with good fighting spirit
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    (Original post by al_94)
    Yes that is true because they had people become professional racing drivers from playing a Gran Turismo and the best got selected to go to the GT Academy where the winner gets a pro contract.
    I remember watching on TV Colin Mcrae play a gamer at his own game. He lost.
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    Yes definitely playing games has been proven to increase your reaction time and sharpen your reflexes and it teaches you about operating weapons and some games even help with other things like stealth and focus which are very helpful in the battlefield
 
 
 
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