Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

AS AQA Geography GEOG1 17th and GEOG2 20th May 2016 Watch

Announcements
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SubwayLover1)
    How is ICT Used in geography ?D:
    would also like to know this
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EnyaS)
    my teacher told me today chi squared was for A2 and not us this year? Does it depend on which fieldwork you carried out?
    Yes, my fieldwork was about glacial deposits. We used chi squared for it, but it would never come up in the first section of UNIT 2 like spear rank would
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Is anyone doing Crowded Coasts or Rebranding?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    also can anyone send an example of study map of a river you investigated to to give me hints with mine

    ill paypal you a fiver
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by geographygenius2)
    would also like to know this
    Though GIS it allows us to work out proportional symbol maps
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by geographygenius2)
    would also like to know this
    An Example,

    Describe one application of ICT skills in carrying out your fieldwork andcomment on its usefulness

    ICT skills were used in the overlaying of data upon GoogleEearth. Scatter graphsand data were overlaid on Google Earth to create a layer upon the satellite image ofthe river Tillingbourne. Each result set was linked to the exact location where it wasgathered. This allowed the trends to be shown even more substantially as thelocational context could be viewed easily and any anomalies could be examined andit was possible to search for factors which could have contributed to theiranomalous nature. However, there were some problems associated with thisapplication; often the images were out of date as the satellite producing the imageshad not passed over the particular location in the recent update. This could lead tofalse conclusion stemming from mis-information. An example of this would bewhere the river was recently straightened by the local council and therefore the riverhad a higher discharge than would have been expected from the satellite image.Also whose land was not shown; this could lead to problems associated withsampling as it could not be taken into consideration, this could lead to falsesampling methods
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jack_wild7)
    Yes, my fieldwork was about glacial deposits. We used chi squared for it, but it would never come up in the first section of UNIT 2 like spear rank would
    Okay that makes sense. My fieldwork was on how environmental and socio-economic factors changed when moving along a transect from the CBD to rural areas.
    Thank you!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Would I be able to talk about gathering census data and using police.gov website as an application of ICT skills for my fieldwork?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rach2802)
    Is anyone doing Crowded Coasts or Rebranding?
    yep, doing both!! how you feeling for it?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by geographygenius2)
    also can anyone send an example of study map of a river you investigated to to give me hints with mine

    ill paypal you a fiver
    Name:  Picture1.jpg
Views: 212
Size:  78.8 KB
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    http://www.slideshare.net/willwillia...xt_slideshow=1
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ceryshughes)
    yep, doing both!! how you feeling for it?
    ok i think! we have done so many practice questions for the fieldwork parts - so hopefully something similar to a past paper will come up as they don't have that many options apart from fieldwork and research, analysis, conclusions, limitations etc, and for the 10 markers I guess its just a case of learning the case studies which I am feeling ok about too!! the thing I'm worried about is timing! what about you?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Predictions for section 1 tomorrow other than it being physical based?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    hey, what is a null hypothesis? i dont get it?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cba_for_exams)
    Need help with a question: suggest further research opportunities arising from the conclusions of your enquiry.
    Our aim was to see how channel characteristics change downstream
    Im doing the same kinda thing and stuff i normally write is
    1)Going back to site to collect additional data and see if there are any seasonal variations and get a broader understanding of the regime of the river ect. (also collecting data from each season allows you to create an annual reading).
    2)Studying areas that affect the river i.e geology , vegetation ,microclimate and urbanisation. For example type of bedrock influences river discharge as an impermeable rock leads to more run off.
    3)Study more sites as having a larger range of data leads to more statistically accurate results and can allow you to use statistical data analyses techniques like standard deviation.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by indecisiveness)
    hey, what is a null hypothesis? i dont get it?
    A hypothesis is a speculation or theory based on insufficient evidence that lends itself to further testing and experimentation. With further testing, a hypothesis can usually be proven true or false. Let's look at an example. Little Susie speculates, or hypothesizes, that the flowers she waters with club soda will grow faster than flowers she waters with plain water. She waters each plant daily for a month (experiment) and proves her hypothesis true!

    A null hypothesis is a hypothesis that says there is no statistical significance between the two variables in the hypothesis. It is the hypothesis that the researcher is trying to disprove. In the example, Susie's null hypothesis would be something like this: There is no statistically significant relationship between the type of water I feed the flowers and growth of the flowers. A researcher is challenged by the null hypothesis and usually wants to disprove it, to demonstrate that there is a statistically-significant relationship between the two variables in the hypothesis.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    can someone help with pros and cons of triangle graphs ????
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EloiseeeAmy)
    Cheeky af question now!!
    Does anyone know any good fieldwork investigation notes for a river study? Looking back at mine from last year (I'm just retaking this unit!) I can see why I did awfully - but I can't go and collect new results now
    Thank you guyss
    http://a2aqageography.blogspot.co.uk/p/skills.html
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rach2802)
    ok i think! we have done so many practice questions for the fieldwork parts - so hopefully something similar to a past paper will come up as they don't have that many options apart from fieldwork and research, analysis, conclusions, limitations etc, and for the 10 markers I guess its just a case of learning the case studies which I am feeling ok about too!! the thing I'm worried about is timing! what about you?

    pretty much the same!! just going over case studies now like Holderness. timings are going to really worry me though!! just gotta stick to the minute a mark and if i spend too long on a 10 marker i just have to skip it! Hopefully will all go fine as found tuesday's exam alright !
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jack_wild7)
    A hypothesis is a speculation or theory based on insufficient evidence that lends itself to further testing and experimentation. With further testing, a hypothesis can usually be proven true or false. Let's look at an example. Little Susie speculates, or hypothesizes, that the flowers she waters with club soda will grow faster than flowers she waters with plain water. She waters each plant daily for a month (experiment) and proves her hypothesis true!

    A null hypothesis is a hypothesis that says there is no statistical significance between the two variables in the hypothesis. It is the hypothesis that the researcher is trying to disprove. In the example, Susie's null hypothesis would be something like this: There is no statistically significant relationship between the type of water I feed the flowers and growth of the flowers. A researcher is challenged by the null hypothesis and usually wants to disprove it, to demonstrate that there is a statistically-significant relationship between the two variables in the hypothesis.
    okay so what would: "there is no significant relationship between the river's discharge and hydraulic radius" be then? i havent completely understood...

    and what about "the river's velocity increases downstream" or "the size of the load decreases downstream"
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Break up or unrequited love?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.