This discussion is closed.
JrW
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 15 years ago
#1
Just out of interest, which of these two is less stressful if you are working for the top companies in each field respectively? Does either have a greater job satisfaction than the other?
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#2
Report 15 years ago
#2
For job satisfaction become a teacher or a doctor.
0
pedy1986
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#3
Report 15 years ago
#3
(Original post by happysunshine)
For job satisfaction become a teacher or a doctor.
Indeed! (I want to be a teacher )

Both are very stressful jobs...you can't really distinguish, and the job satisfaction depends on yourself, do you crave success? do you like helping others?
0
marabara
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#4
Report 15 years ago
#4
(Original post by corey)
Both are very stressful jobs...you can't really distinguish, and the job satisfaction depends on yourself, do you crave success? do you like helping others?
indeed, for job satisfaction only you can answer that question

however, neither of these rank very well by most peoples' job satisfaction criteria
0
dmitrij_savicki
Badges: 0
#5
Report 15 years ago
#5
(Original post by jamierwilliams)
Just out of interest, which of these two is less stressful if you are working for the top companies in each field respectively? Does either have a greater job satisfaction than the other?
i dont know which country yiu are wrining from but in england there is no such proffesion as a lawyer.
0
marabara
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#6
Report 15 years ago
#6
(Original post by marabara)
indeed, for job satisfaction only you can answer that question

however, neither of these rank very well by most peoples' job satisfaction criteria
also, both jobs are very different, so you should really know which you'd rather go for if you are ranking by job satisfaction!

wouldn't like to be a lawyer though - not only is it stressful, but you'd have to look after dodgy people, or worse than that, at times
0
lexazver203
Badges: 0
#7
Report 15 years ago
#7
i've applied to doa degree in an investment banking @ reading so you can guess my preference.
0
Brown Patrick Bateman
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 15 years ago
#8
I'd think being an investment banker for a top ("bulge bracket") organisation would be a lot more stressful than being a solicitor for a top ("magic circle") firm, particularly since the degree of volatility and uncertainty is greater in the former field, and the cost of putting a foot wrong is typically higher.
0
muncrun
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#9
Report 15 years ago
#9
(Original post by dmitrij_savicki)
i dont know which country yiu are wrining from but in england there is no such proffesion as a lawyer.
In his defence, the term lawyer refers to anyone with expert knowledge in the field of law. As such, it includes both barristers, solicitors, judges and academics. Some go so far as to argue that it includes law students. To say that one may be a lawyer working for a law firm is perfectly acceptable.

EDIT: If one were to be a stickler on this, the words yiu, wrining, england and proffesion are all either spelt incorrectly or are grammatically incorrect. A pedantic point, I know, but so was yours.
0
MentallyIll
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 15 years ago
#10
(Original post by Jools)
I'd think being an investment banker for a top ("bulge bracket") organisation would be a lot more stressful than being a solicitor for a top ("magic circle") firm, particularly since the degree of volatility and uncertainty is greater in the former field, and the cost of putting a foot wrong is typically higher.
I concur.
0
JrW
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 15 years ago
#11
(Original post by muncrun)
In his defence, the term lawyer refers to anyone with expert knowledge in the field of law. As such, it includes both barristers, solicitors, judges and academics. Some go so far as to argue that it includes law students. To say that one may be a lawyer working for a law firm is perfectly acceptable.

EDIT: If one were to be a stickler on this, the words yiu, wrining, england and proffesion are all either spelt incorrectly or are grammatically incorrect. A pedantic point, I know, but so was yours.
the feeling of being supported is great! And yes as you said, 'lawyer' is a generalisation of legal academics or barristers or solicitors. In fact, I think that is the case for most countries because, for example, in America solicitors are not called lawyers, but advocates
0
Alexander
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#12
Report 15 years ago
#12
(Original post by jamierwilliams)
Just out of interest, which of these two is less stressful if you are working for the top companies in each field respectively? Does either have a greater job satisfaction than the other?
Why are you interested?
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you made your firm and insurance uni choices yet?

Yes (65)
52%
Yes, but I want to swap them (10)
8%
No, but I know who I want to choose (14)
11.2%
No, I still don't know who I want to choose (33)
26.4%
I have decided I don't want to go to uni anymore and will not be choosing (3)
2.4%

Watched Threads

View All