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Bulking up. Tips for nutrition and routines? Watch

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    I'm 19 and at 140 so obviously want to bulk and become more toned. Is it possible to get to a good level in the next 7 months. I want to really research and make sure i'm doing the right form/right shake e.t.c. Quite skinny so there is a big reason too, what routine would you suggest? I'm considering going four times a week, isolating chest/back, shoulders/arms, legs and a mixed day. Want to go slowly and build up, any tips/advice?
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    Inb4 Angry cucumber with link to FAQ
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3014757
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    The bottom line is find a good routine and eat way more than you do currently.
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    Train until failure, constantly. Prefer good form over too much weight, always, but at the same time remember that you must, again, do your sets until failure. About food, well, the harder you'll train and the more you'll get hungry; just est clean and good food like pasta and meat (prefer chicken and similar over red meat though, that can't be eaten everyday). Really, just train train and eat eat, that's my best advice - don't overthink plans. You can see results in the first two months. I'm 19, I was skinny and gained about 7 kg's since last august, and it's practically all lean muscle. Make pull ups become one of your favourite excercises, too .
    P.s I hope you're thinking of going to an actual gym and not just doing it by yourself.
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    (Original post by Adrono)
    Train until failure, constantly. Prefer good form over too much weight, always, but at the same time remember that you must, again, do your sets until failure. About food, well, the harder you'll train and the more you'll get hungry; just est clean and good food like pasta and meat (prefer chicken and similar over red meat though, that can't be eaten everyday). Really, just train train and eat eat, that's my best advice - don't overthink plans. You can see results in the first two months. I'm 19, I was skinny and gained about 7 kg's since last august, and it's practically all lean muscle. Make pull ups become one of your favourite excercises, too .
    P.s I hope you're thinking of going to an actual gym and not just doing it by yourself.

    Why?

    My advice is to keep it numerical. Count calories. IIFYM calculator. It takes a few minutes to count calories every day, and you can adjust for your weight gain so your bulking doesn't stagnate, ultimately giving you more out of your training, eating and recovery.

    Compound movements, keep it simple and fun. Bulking is the best part of training. Enjoy it.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Why?

    My advice is to keep it numerical. Count calories. IIFYM calculator. It takes a few minutes to count calories every day, and you can adjust for your weight gain so your bulking doesn't stagnate, ultimately giving you more out of your training, eating and recovery.

    Compound movements, keep it simple and fun. Bulking is the best part of training. Enjoy it.
    That's not the spirit. And while you should indeed count repetitions (i.e. keeping in that 8-12 range - but that's something the gym trainer will tell you) you need to make sure your last rep is the last you can do. Train hard, don't overthink numbers and ****, really.

    I forgot, also make sure you don't wait too much between sets: your training has to be intensive. I don't stay in the gym for more than one hour and a half, usually.
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    (Original post by Adrono)
    That's not the spirit. And while you should indeed count repetitions (i.e. keeping in that 8-12 range - but that's something the gym trainer will tell you) you need to make sure your last rep is the last you can do. Train hard, don't overthink numbers and sh*t, really.
    What are the benefits of training to failure, 'constantly'?

    Seems like a quick way to absolutely exhaust yourself. Would be incredibly difficult to train like this if you play a sport. There is no need for a new trainee (I assume new) to train to failure all the time, especially on the big movements.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    What are the benefits of training to failure, 'constantly'?

    Seems like a quick way to absolutely exhaust yourself. Would be incredibly difficult to train like this if you play a sport. There is no need for a new trainee (I assume new) to train to failure all the time, especially on the big movements.
    How are you supposed, exactly, to build muscle if you don't stress it enough to allow it do so? That's the basics. If you do 10 reps but you could still do 10 more then your training is pointless. As soon as you learn the form you should indeed train to failure. Again, your last rep has to be the last you can do. You must feel the burn, one would say. That is if you want results.
    I obviously don't mean you should ****ing collapse in the gym. You may have misunderstood me.
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    (Original post by Adrono)
    How are you supposed, exactly, to build muscle if you don't stress it enough to allow it do so? That's the basics. If you do 10 reps but you could still do 10 more then your training is pointless. As soon as you learn the form you should indeed train to failure. Again, your last rep has to be the last you can do. You must feel the burn, one would say. That is if you want results.
    I obviously don't mean you should ****ing collapse in the gym.
    You can do stress the muscle adequately without going to failure. Attempting to achieve muscle failure all the time is potentially dangerous advice, be careful.

    It takes thousands of reps and many months - years of lifting and thinking about lifting to learn the form that is most appropriate to your body. You can build a hulk of muscle in the mean time

    You don't have to feel any burn to get good results. Take heavy squats or deadlifts to absolute failure 3x a week and I'd bet on them collapsing lol.
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    (Original post by Adrono)
    Train until failure, constantly. Prefer good form over too much weight, always, but at the same time remember that you must, again, do your sets until failure. About food, well, the harder you'll train and the more you'll get hungry; just est clean and good food like pasta and meat (prefer chicken and similar over red meat though, that can't be eaten everyday). Really, just train train and eat eat, that's my best advice - don't overthink plans. You can see results in the first two months. I'm 19, I was skinny and gained about 7 kg's since last august, and it's practically all lean muscle. Make pull ups become one of your favourite excercises, too .
    P.s I hope you're thinking of going to an actual gym and not just doing it by yourself.
    Cheers mate, yeah I go to a really nice gym got pretty much everything I need. What routine should I start with, best to isolate each part of the body for each day? What about cardio too. I do want to bulk up and become a bit more toned but yeah will work hard.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    You can do stress the muscle adequately without going to failure. Attempting to achieve muscle failure all the time is potentially dangerous advice, be careful.

    It takes thousands of reps and many months - years of lifting and thinking about lifting to learn the form that is most appropriate to your body. You can build a hulk of muscle in the mean time

    You don't have to feel any burn to get good results. Take heavy squats or deadlifts to absolute failure 3x a week and I'd bet on them collapsing lol.
    Yeah mate but you misunderstood what I was saying it seems. I mean that your last rep HAS to be the last you can do. Find the proper weight you can do to keep in that rep range with the proper form. Of course, you'll get better and better at your form as you lift - back excercises especially will take some time. By the way I don't see why anyone would do squats and deads 3x a week haha, that's not a good plan.
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    (Original post by Adrono)
    Yeah mate but you misunderstood what I was saying it seems. I mean that your last rep HAS to be the last you can do. Find the proper weight you can do to keep in that rep range with the proper form. Of course, you'll get better and better at your form as you lift - back excercises especially will take some time. By the way I don't see why anyone would do squats and deads 3x a week haha, that's not a good plan.
    I didn't misunderstand you.

    I'm saying that you do not at all, ever, have to go to failure to achieve good results, or results at all for that matter. Training to failure for a beginner is risky business when motor patterns are not ingrained and form is usually bad anyway.

    Why is deadlifting and squatting 3x a week bad..?
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    (Original post by krs141)
    Cheers mate, yeah I go to a really nice gym got pretty much everything I need. What routine should I start with, best to isolate each part of the body for each day? What about cardio too. I do want to bulk up and become a bit more toned but yeah will work hard.
    Listen to the trainer, he'll explain you best, if it's a good gym. They'll usually make you start without isolating the muscles and only after one or two months you'll begin training with the so called splits.

    My current split is: chest + biceps; back + triceps; legs + shoulders. I'm comfortable with it. It's not a huge deal though; again, don't overthink plans: I like this split, which is the one my instructor gave me anyways, as I can pump the biceps more during chest day as they're already involved a lot in back excercises. Same goes for triceps and chest excercises.

    Regarding cardio, it's good to do it: personally, I like to go running in the park on sundays and whenever I get free time and I'm not going to the gym. I only use the cardio machines at the gym to warm up before training.
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    (Original post by hezzlington)
    I didn't misunderstand you.

    I'm saying that you do not at all, ever, have to go to failure to achieve good results, or results at all for that matter. Training to failure for a beginner is risky business when motor patterns are not ingrained and form is usually bad anyway.

    Why is deadlifting and squatting 3x a week bad..?
    Then I have no idea where you're coming from. Again, it's the basics of muscle growth to stress your muscle enough. And if you don't train until failure it simply won't, ever, be stressed as much as it could be. I've stated clearly that you must learn good form first however, maybe you didn't read that. And who on earth squats 3x a week? Well I guess that could be reasonable, somehow, but not for me as I do another sport too and I'm active all week.
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    Hey mate, how tall are you so I can get a feel for how skinny you are? My advice would be to buy some sort of weight gainer shake (I used serious mass by optimum nutrition I think) as that stuff has a tonne of calories, carbs and protein which are the main things you need to bulk. When I used a weight gainer I gained 5kg in a month or so with about half of that being some fat which you can easily cut back later but if you are looking for quick results then it's ideal. I would advise doing compound movements such as squats, bench and deadlift. Try to build up as heavy as you can with these over time but I recommend finding a weight you can do sets of 8 with to maximise strength and size gains. Don't bother with any isolation exercises until you can bench 50-60kg and can deadlift 90kg and squat 80kg for reps. The isolation exercises will give you much slower results for the time you spend doing them. Safe mate.
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    (Original post by krs141)
    I'm 19 and at 140 so obviously want to bulk and become more toned. Is it possible to get to a good level in the next 7 months. I want to really research and make sure i'm doing the right form/right shake e.t.c. Quite skinny so there is a big reason too, what routine would you suggest? I'm considering going four times a week, isolating chest/back, shoulders/arms, legs and a mixed day. Want to go slowly and build up, any tips/advice?
    GOMAD diet; worked wonders for me

    Also, mutant mass shake on top of your regular meals works 100%

    Don't forget to train hard as well. AVOID cardio!!
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    lol what am I reading... avoid cardio and take "miracolous" shakes.

    Again, my honest advice, which comes mainly from personal experience, is to traaain and eaaat a lot, but that doesn't mean you need to take shakes, by no means. And, of course, I remind you that before you train hard and do your reps to failure make sure you've had enough experience so that you've learnt good form, and, let me add, know how to properly warm up, or hezzlington will come and admonish me :P.
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    (Original post by Niely)
    Hey mate, how tall are you so I can get a feel for how skinny you are? My advice would be to buy some sort of weight gainer shake (I used serious mass by optimum nutrition I think) as that stuff has a tonne of calories, carbs and protein which are the main things you need to bulk. When I used a weight gainer I gained 5kg in a month or so with about half of that being some fat which you can easily cut back later but if you are looking for quick results then it's ideal. I would advise doing compound movements such as squats, bench and deadlift. Try to build up as heavy as you can with these over time but I recommend finding a weight you can do sets of 8 with to maximise strength and size gains. Don't bother with any isolation exercises until you can bench 50-60kg and can deadlift 90kg and squat 80kg for reps. The isolation exercises will give you much slower results for the time you spend doing them. Safe mate.

    5 10, We have optimum nutriton, 100% whey at home which I'll prbably use. Should I use it straightaway as in right from the start of going gym
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    After seeing some of these responses, I would go to YouTube for some better advice on what to do.


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    (Original post by Adrono)
    lol what am I reading... avoid cardio and take "miracolous" shakes.

    Again, my honest advice, which comes mainly from personal experience, is to traaain and eaaat a lot, but that doesn't mean you need to take shakes, by no means. And, of course, I remind you that before you train hard and do your reps to failure make sure you've had enough experience so that you've learnt good form, and, let me add, know how to properly warm up, or hezzlington will come and admonish me :P.
    Train as in what way. Yeah I know form is most important, just want to figure out what kind of routine I set for myself. Properly warm up?
 
 
 
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