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    I have been considering using a computer for my exam as my handwriting is terrible. However are there any disadvantages from using a computer? For example as its easier to read the examiners may notice grammar mistakes or something.

    My teacher has talked to me about using a computer but hes still not certain as it is still readable and its not as bad as others but only just.
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    What A level would let you use a computer for the actual exam?

    Learn how to handwrite better is a good option.
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    I would say the only real disadvantage is that you have to be quite careful that your spelling and grammar are correct. Obviously, spelling and grammar checks are disabled when you type your exams, so you need to check your spelling and grammar carefully as it's easy to mistype when you're under exam time pressure.

    Also, if you're typing your exam in a room with others who are also typing their exams, the sound of the other people typing could be distracting, but it depends on whether that sort of thing would bother you or not.

    Another thing is that if you're doing exams for a subject which requires you to draw diagrams etc, it can get a bit annoying having to keep switching between typing on the screen and drawing on the exam paper. But maybe that's just me
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    Generally, you ll need a diagnosed condition to be able to get PC use approved for an exam.

    I ve only had it since starting Uni but although yes you can hear other people typing the advantages, I find being in a room with much less people makes me feel less anxious, generally the advantages outweigh any disadvantages of it. Without seeing your handwriting then i really couldn't say but look up dysgraphia just incase its more than your handwriting being a little messy.

    (Original post by Kholmes1)
    I have been considering using a computer for my exam as my handwriting is terrible. However are there any disadvantages from using a computer? For example as its easier to read the examiners may notice grammar mistakes or something.

    My teacher has talked to me about using a computer but hes still not certain as it is still readable and its not as bad as others but only just.
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    (Original post by Kholmes1)
    I have been considering using a computer for my exam as my handwriting is terrible. However are there any disadvantages from using a computer? For example as its easier to read the examiners may notice grammar mistakes or something.

    My teacher has talked to me about using a computer but hes still not certain as it is still readable and its not as bad as others but only just.
    Callum should be able to help.
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    (Original post by z_of_8.1)
    What A level would let you use a computer for the actual exam?

    Learn how to handwrite better is a good option.
    Most of them? I didn't use a computer for gcse.
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    I would say the only real disadvantage is that you have to be quite careful that your spelling and grammar are correct. Obviously, spelling and grammar checks are disabled when you type your exams, so you need to check your spelling and grammar carefully as it's easy to mistype when you're under exam time pressure.

    Also, if you're typing your exam in a room with others who are also typing their exams, the sound of the other people typing could be distracting, but it depends on whether that sort of thing would bother you or not.

    Another thing is that if you're doing exams for a subject which requires you to draw diagrams etc, it can get a bit annoying having to keep switching between typing on the screen and drawing on the exam paper. But maybe that's just me
    Thanks.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Generally, you ll need a diagnosed condition to be able to get PC use approved for an exam.

    I ve only had it since starting Uni but although yes you can hear other people typing the advantages, I find being in a room with much less people makes me feel less anxious, generally the advantages outweigh any disadvantages of it. Without seeing your handwriting then i really couldn't say but look up dysgraphia just incase its more than your handwriting being a little messy.
    Thanks.
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    I had to use a typing device (there's probably a technical name for it which I don't know) last year when I had problems with my right hand, which I use for writing. I found that it reduced my speed in note taking because I'm quite a fast writer, which was a bit annoying, but it's probably worth doing if you're quite fast with technology. Maybe try asking for using a device that doesn't check spellings and grammar, otherwise you'll probably end up editing your work as you go, which isn't great in time-limited conditions..
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    (Original post by Kholmes1)
    I have been considering using a computer for my exam as my handwriting is terrible. However are there any disadvantages from using a computer? For example as its easier to read the examiners may notice grammar mistakes or something.

    My teacher has talked to me about using a computer but hes still not certain as it is still readable and its not as bad as others but only just.
    Well, providing you have a typing speed equivalent or better to your writing speed, usually writing speed is about 25-30WPM and typing considerably higher if you're used to it, but even at something like a 30WPM on a computer (providing you're typing accurately) is much better than perhaps a slower slightly illegible rate of writing, I type at much higher speeds than that allowing me for my written exams to almost have an edge with timings as I can illustrate my thoughts quicker.

    Exam papers are easier to read this way, and will be assessed typically as a whole paper rather than individual exam questions which are scanned in. The usual procedure or at least at my college is to be given a computer login, you are given some form of Microsoft Word or such like which has disabled spell & grammar check and you would save it. Then go to the exams office after the exam, get it printed, sign it and you're done.

    Also, remember you don't have to do all of your papers using the computer & you're allowed the flexibility of choosing between the two, or using both (for example, graphs I would manually draw, likewise all maths I do is on paper).
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    (Original post by Kholmes1)
    I have been considering using a computer for my exam as my handwriting is terrible. However are there any disadvantages from using a computer? For example as its easier to read the examiners may notice grammar mistakes or something.

    My teacher has talked to me about using a computer but hes still not certain as it is still readable and its not as bad as others but only just.
    To qualify, it has to be your normal way of working, so if you want to use it for extended writing then you have to use a word processor pretty much all the time for that.
 
 
 
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