In spoken discourse analysis... Watch

Depa
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In spoken discourse analysis, is it sufficient to just comment about mode features e.g. pauses, tag questions, adjacency pair and not or barely talk about grammatical things?
Because in spontaneous speech I can't really find significant grammatical features to comment on and relate to meanings.

Thanks
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The Empire Odyssey
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(Original post by Depa)
In spoken discourse analysis, is it sufficient to just comment about mode features e.g. pauses, tag questions, adjacency pair and not or barely talk about grammatical things?
Because in spontaneous speech I can't really find significant grammatical features to comment on and relate to meanings.

Thanks
That's correct.

You can still pick out word classes though. But you're looking for spoken language terminology rather than picking things out such as clauses and etc.

If you're looking at children's spoken language - you do have to comment on the grammar stuff though.
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Depa
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(Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
That's correct.

You can still pick out word classes though. But you're looking for spoken language terminology rather than picking things out such as clauses and etc.

If you're looking at children's spoken language - you do have to comment on the grammar stuff though.
Thanks When I comment about the features then, is it okay to just focus on the participants' self representations, their relationships etc. and not about the actual topic they are talking about?
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The Empire Odyssey
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(Original post by Depa)
Thanks When I comment about the features then, is it okay to just focus on the participants' self representations, their relationships etc. and not about the actual topic they are talking about?
You should relate your linguistic findings with the topic they are talking about. After all, you are looking at how they are representing their topic through your linguistic awareness.
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Depa
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(Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
You should relate your linguistic findings with the topic they are talking about. After all, you are looking at how they are representing their topic through your linguistic awareness.
Okay, but I always struggle to relate the spoken mode features e.g. discourse structure such as turn-taking or narrative structure to the representation of the topic.. It just seems hard to link the features with the topic for spoken discourse, so I tend to focus on the speakers. Could you please suggest how?
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(Original post by Depa)
Okay, but I always struggle to relate the spoken mode features e.g. discourse structure such as turn-taking or narrative structure to the representation of the topic.. It just seems hard to link the features with the topic for spoken discourse, so I tend to focus on the speakers. Could you please suggest how?
Is this for coursework?

You need to pick more easier transcripts to analyse if you are struggling to find features that links in with the topic. You don't need to find a certain topic that much either. You can relate turn taking with gender and etc. If they use jargon or slang you can say things like they are comfortable with the person, then go on to talk about speech acts etc. You just need to know how the features can and do relate to one another.

If it's for exam, you just need to practice more!
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evantej
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(Original post by Depa)
In spoken discourse analysis, is it sufficient to just comment about mode features e.g. pauses, tag questions, adjacency pair and not or barely talk about grammatical things?
Because in spontaneous speech I can't really find significant grammatical features to comment on and relate to meanings.

Thanks
If you wanted to show knowledge of syntax you could show how tag questions differ to normal questions. You could even do this descriptively without having to know too much. For example:

Jesus was the son of God, wasn't he?
Who was the son of God? / Was Jesus the son of God?

You do not need to know anything about wh-questions or auxiliary verbs to know that normal questions tend to use a wh form at the beginning of the sentence. You could then consider what kind of answer you get from these different questions. Tag questions almost seem redundant at times because they have effectively expressed the proposition already and can only be accepted or denied whereas normal questions can have a broader range of answers.
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Depa
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(Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
Is this for coursework?

You need to pick more easier transcripts to analyse if you are struggling to find features that links in with the topic. You don't need to find a certain topic that much either. You can relate turn taking with gender and etc. If they use jargon or slang you can say things like they are comfortable with the person, then go on to talk about speech acts etc. You just need to know how the features can and do relate to one another.

If it's for exam, you just need to practice more!
It's for exam, so it looks like I need to practice more.. T.T

Anyway, thanks so much for your help!
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Depa
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(Original post by evantej)
If you wanted to show knowledge of syntax you could show how tag questions differ to normal questions. You could even do this descriptively without having to know too much. For example:

Jesus was the son of God, wasn't he?
Who was the son of God? / Was Jesus the son of God?

You do not need to know anything about wh-questions or auxiliary verbs to know that normal questions tend to use a wh form at the beginning of the sentence. You could then consider what kind of answer you get from these different questions. Tag questions almost seem redundant at times because they have effectively expressed the proposition already and can only be accepted or denied whereas normal questions can have a broader range of answers.
Got it. Thanks for giving me a new thing to comment on the use of tag questions
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