More difficult to get a First class in Arts subjects? Watch

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the_alba
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#41
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#41
I wouldn't say nigh on impossible - it's easy if you're good. But yes, you have a point. The flip-side is that while far fewer people get 1sts in Arts subjects, it's ridiculously hard to come away with less than a 2:1, if you read at least something during your degree and can write decent English.
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ChemistBoy
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#42
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(Original post by Cexy)
Which is exactly why employers understand that:

1. A degree from a top-ranking university is more impressive than a degree from a mid-table university,

2. A first in Mathematics or the sciences is impressive, but less impressive than a first in, say, Law, and

3. A 2.1 in an arts subject is less impressive than a 2.1 in a science subject.
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not1
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#43
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I dispute the idea that you have to be a real genius to get a 1st in maths/science. A lot of the time it really is just cram, cram, cram, exam... good mark. And I don't think you have to really understand the material that well either, provided you know what the model answers to questions look like. Remember that in undergraduate maths/physics, for eg, there are only so many 'examinable' questions that can be asked (given time constraints, you can't solve anything too ugly in 30 mins for eg)
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ChemistBoy
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#44
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(Original post by edders)
I dispute the idea that you have to be a real genius to get a 1st in maths/science. A lot of the time it really is just cram, cram, cram, exam... good mark. And I don't think you have to really understand the material that well either, provided you know what the model answers to questions look like. Remember that in undergraduate maths/physics, for eg, there are only so many 'examinable' questions that can be asked (given time constraints, you can't solve anything too ugly in 30 mins for eg)
To be honest genius and assessment don't always go together. Hawking was only borderline for his first, for example.
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the_alba
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#45
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^^ (edders) I think that's what most people have been saying. And it doesn't take a genius to get a first in anything - they're just undergraduate degrees, fergodsake.

ChemistBoy, what the hell does that mean? (your symbols in the above but one post I mean)
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ChemistBoy
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#46
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(Original post by the_alba)
ChemistBoy, what the hell does that mean? (your symbols in the above but one post I mean)
What are the pictures of? Put them together in order.
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the_alba
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#47
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I see. God, I'm slow.
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ChemistBoy
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#48
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(Original post by the_alba)
I see. God, I'm slow.
Arts graduates, eh?

:p:

Actually I'll probably get a warning for violating the swear filter now.
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Wise One
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#49
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
To be honest genius and assessment don't always go together. Hawking was only borderline for his first, for example.
It's because the education system doesn't seem to reward originality until postgrad level.

(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Actually I'll probably get a warning for violating the swear filter now.
Genius.
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shady lane
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(Original post by Wise One)
It's because the education system doesn't seem to reward originality until postgrad level.
You'd be surprised how little it is rewarded even at the postgrad level.
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the_alba
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#51
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#51
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Arts graduates, eh?

:p:
I was waiting for that. And my grandmother beats me at Countdown. Though I am good at chess (trying to redeem myself here).
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the_alba
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#52
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(Original post by Wise One)
It's because the education system doesn't seem to reward originality until postgrad level.
Actually originality was consistently rewarded throughout my undergrad degree, beyond all my expectations.

That was only two years ago, but since I left they've been trying to bring in this rule that students must not be allowed to invent their own essay titles - pandering to the 2:2-standard drone if ever I saw it.

It also depends on the institution. Too much originality at Oxford and they call the men in white coats (like the opening scene of Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest).
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Scuttle
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#53
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#53
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Mech Eng is not a science!
All engineering is applied science.
I don't think anyone here would class engineering as wildly different from even the 'pure' sciences.

For the sake of argument here, Engineering is a subject that leads directly to a career, and has all the other hallmarks of something like physics in terms of the work you do.
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Scuttle
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#54
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#54
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
To be honest genius and assessment don't always go together. Hawking was only borderline for his first, for example.
Stephen Hawking does face much criticism from his peers. At least I have read some.
It could be his theories, but it's more likely his low first.
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the_alba
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#55
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^^ I came up with all mine. If I'd had to stick to the guideline suggestions I'd probably have run away in indignation and joined the proverbial circus.
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ChemistBoy
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#56
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(Original post by Scuttle)
Stephen Hawking does face much criticism from his peers. At least I have read some.
It could be his theories, but it's more likely his low first.
Joking I presume?
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Scuttle
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#57
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#57
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Joking I presume?
I'm upset that you had to ask.

Although he is criticised in scientific fields occasionally. I beleive the Information Paradox caused some contraversy?
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ChemistBoy
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(Original post by Scuttle)
I'm upset that you had to ask.

Although he is criticised in scientific fields occasionally. I beleive the Information Paradox caused some contraversy?
Well, Hawking did himself admit that there were flaws to parts of his work. Such theoretical physics is really out of my league because it is so beyond experiment it is borderline science.
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Scuttle
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#59
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Well, Hawking did himself admit that there were flaws to parts of his work. Such theoretical physics is really out of my league because it is so beyond experiment it is borderline science.
Quite. Mind bending stuff though, I try to understand it but I've little hope, especially when they introduce the high level maths.

I think Hawkings actually spoke at a meeting of minds a few years back, and everyone was expecting a retraction of his earlier statements. Instead he just came out with something equally unwelcomed. Great stuff.
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ChemistBoy
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#60
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(Original post by Scuttle)
I think Hawkings actually spoke at a meeting of minds a few years back, and everyone was expecting a retraction of his earlier statements. Instead he just came out with something equally unwelcomed. Great stuff.
Bah! It's all flim-flam until we get some experiments done.
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