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    I'm in year 12 atm and am trying to figure out what university course I might go into. I want to do medicine but can't see myself doing chemistry for two years so am thinking about doing Medicine post graduate instead. I saw on the Warwick website that they accept graduates with a 2:1 in any degree and I was wondering if that really means any degree or that it's better to do a science degree? Like would it make a difference if I was to do, say, Literature at undergraduate and then apply for Medicine postgrad? Very confused
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    (Original post by takeitbackx)
    I'm in year 12 atm and am trying to figure out what university course I might go into. I want to do medicine but can't see myself doing chemistry for two years so am thinking about doing Medicine post graduate instead. I saw on the Warwick website that they accept graduates with a 2:1 in any degree and I was wondering if that really means any degree or that it's better to do a science degree? Like would it make a difference if I was to do, say, Literature at undergraduate and then apply for Medicine postgrad? Very confused
    Yes, some medical schools will accept any degree subject. If they've said that, then they won't make any distinction between arts and science degrees, so yes, a literature degree would be fine.

    A level chemistry is a pain, but graduate entry medicine is a very competitive route to take - and it will end up being more expensive in the long run since you're paying for two degrees. I would very strongly advise you to take the right A levels and try and get into medicine after year 13.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Yes, some medical schools will accept any degree subject. If they've said that, then they won't make any distinction between arts and science degrees, so yes, a literature degree would be fine.

    A level chemistry is a pain, but graduate entry medicine is a very competitive route to take - and it will end up being more expensive in the long run since you're paying for two degrees. I would very strongly advise you to take the right A levels and try and get into medicine after year 13.
    Thank you for your reply, it's helped clear up some confusion!
    The original plan was to apply for medicine straight after a levels but I went to a seminar at my local hospital very recently and nearly every doctor/junior doctor I spoke to advised that postgraduate was actually easier as you're then able to handle the pressure at an older age. I'm still considering my options but I can't see myself doing chemistry for two years, it's just causing me too much stress this year and I'd prefer to focus on the remaining three. Again, thank you for the advice though!
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    (Original post by takeitbackx)
    Thank you for your reply, it's helped clear up some confusion!
    The original plan was to apply for medicine straight after a levels but I went to a seminar at my local hospital very recently and nearly every doctor/junior doctor I spoke to advised that postgraduate was actually easier as you're then able to handle the pressure at an older age. I'm still considering my options but I can't see myself doing chemistry for two years, it's just causing me too much stress this year and I'd prefer to focus on the remaining three. Again, thank you for the advice though!
    You're welcome. I don't think those doctors were saying that getting in is easier as a graduate.

    Being 21+ as a GEP student might make certain aspects of the course more manageable (mostly because you're over the thrill of sambuca shots every night and are probably more work oriented), but getting in is much, much easier at 18. This is very much a reality and if you need further proof, feel free to look up the competition ratios for GEPs vs 5 year degrees.
 
 
 
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