Are you allowed to attend lectures in subjects you aren't studying at Oxford? Watch

YouGotTrolled
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Blondie987
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Unless they take registers, I'd say go for it, you're forking out thousands of pounds for an education at one of the best universities in the world, take whatever you can get lol
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Star Light
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(Original post by Blondie987)
Unless they take registers, I'd say go for it, you're forking out thousands of pounds for an education at one of the best universities in the world, take whatever you can get lol
Can't speak for Oxford but at Cambridge there's no registration of any kind, you just sit down and wait for it to start, so it's very easy to do so. But most of the courses there should keep you busy enough with your own lectures!
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brendan.
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(Original post by FrankTeller1234)
Say you are a mathematics student, would you theoretically be allowed to attend first/second/third year lectures in a subject/topic that happened to pique your interest; say, philosophy, history or modern-languages? Or are you confined to the subscribed lectures for your course?

If this is permitted, how common is it in practice? Do many students do this?
I think it is allowed, but it might be subject specific. I know of friends who studied law who went along to some economics or politics lectures. Equally, I remember seeing some PhD students and chemistry students attend our biochemistry lectures. I've not heard or any registration for lectures, so it would be possible. I'd imagine your lectures would clash though so in that sense it might not be possible.
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walking in sand
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anyone can do that


no one actually does it
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somethingbeautiful
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Not sure about Oxford but in my first year at uni I did this because the lectures in 1st year were massive - the lecture halls were packed out. But by second year it wasn't like that at all. I think it had a lot to do with the fact that in the Humanities/Arts and Languages departments we took compulsory cross-faculty subsidiary modules in first year so in my subject (Philosophy) we had History/English/Politics/French etc students sitting in on our Philosophy lectures and likewise we were all attending lectures for other subjects too.

So you never really knew what degree people were studying in your lectures (beside the people sat right next to you if you chatted to them) and there were no registers for lectures, only seminars/tutorials. But by second year we were all back to our own subjects entirely so the lectures were smaller, there was a register passed around and faces became more familiar so we'd know if someone new was in the lecture theater. By 3rd year it would have been impossible to attend a lecture for another subject without being asked who you were because lectures weren't held in the massive lecture halls by that point - they were in places such as the Law faculty's moot room/conference rooms or small lecture theaters. Lecture attendance was barely more than 20 people in 3rd year (as opposed to 100+ in first year). So if you want to attend other lectures, 1st year is the time to do it. PS. I sat in on Biology lectures in my 1st year without enrolling in the class (we couldn't cross into the sciences from humanities) and I was completely confused but massively intrigued - now I'm studying Biology at university. So some people might think it's a waste of time to sit in on random classes but it could spark an interest in something and could lead to something you didn't imagine.
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fluteflute
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(Original post by FrankTeller1234)
Say you are a mathematics student, would you theoretically be allowed to attend first/second/third year lectures in a subject/topic that happened to pique your interest; say, philosophy, history or modern-languages? Or are you confined to the subscribed lectures for your course?

If this is permitted, how common is it in practice? Do many students do this?
Yes, Oxford allows this, except for in Medicine (although even there, I don't think anyone would notice).

It's not very common though. I think I might be the only person I know to have done it.
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by fluteflute)
except for in Medicine
Why?
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fluteflute
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(Original post by Plagioclase)
Why?
Hmm, actually I take that back.

But you might find this thread interesting:
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1780986
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user73867
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I would risk this for chocolate biscuit 9 times out of 10.
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