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    (Original post by Riordave1875)
    She's already stated that other people she knows consider her the go to person about relationships.

    Despite having never been in one myself I've been told by a few people I give pretty good advice on relationships so experience is kind of irrelevant
    Exactly that. I was always somehow the person who people came to, mostly because i dont sugar coat things and if someone is ****ing around I will just tell them, which helps a lot from what I see.
    My current boyfriend went from a total friendzone to chasing me for nearly 3 years and we are nearly 2 years together. So i think my 'ways' work well
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    A relation ~ can be reflexive, symmetric or transitive. If it is all 3 then it is called an equivalence relation.

    If a relation is reflexive if for values a, then a~a.

    If a relation is symmetric, then for some values a and b, if a~b, then b~a.

    If a relation is transitive, then for some values a, b and c, if a~b and b~c then a~c.

    But what is '~'? It's just.. some property, I suppose.
    For example, if you had a class full of people and defined ~ as 'has the same birthday as' then the 'objects' a,b,c are the people in the class.

    a~a means that a has the same birthday as a, which means it has the same birthday as itself.. so if your birthday is on some date then you have the same birthday as yourself. (So it is reflexive).

    a~b means that a has the same birthday as b. If that is true, then b has the same birthday as a so b~a, and so a~b implies that b~a and so it is symmetric.

    If a~b and b~c then a has the same birthday as b and b has the same birthday as c, so a must have the same birthday as c so a~c. So it is transitive.

    So 'has the same birthday as' is an equivalence relation.
    she wants an injection into her kernel ?
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    A relation ~ can be reflexive, symmetric or transitive. If it is all 3 then it is called an equivalence relation.

    If a relation is reflexive if for values a, then a~a.

    If a relation is symmetric, then for some values a and b, if a~b, then b~a.

    If a relation is transitive, then for some values a, b and c, if a~b and b~c then a~c.

    But what is '~'? It's just.. some property, I suppose.
    For example, if you had a class full of people and defined ~ as 'has the same birthday as' then the 'objects' a,b,c are the people in the class.

    a~a means that a has the same birthday as a, which means it has the same birthday as itself.. so if your birthday is on some date then you have the same birthday as yourself. (So it is reflexive).

    a~b means that a has the same birthday as b. If that is true, then b has the same birthday as a so b~a, and so a~b implies that b~a and so it is symmetric.

    If a~b and b~c then a has the same birthday as b and b has the same birthday as c, so a must have the same birthday as c so a~c. So it is transitive.

    So 'has the same birthday as' is an equivalence relation.
    wtf are you talking about :lol:
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    (Original post by natalia97)
    ask me anything.
    Im chill so ask away.
    Im knows as the relationship guru.
    Ask me anything.
    I'm chill, so ask away.
    I'm known as the relationship guru.
    Do you even SPG brah?
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    (Original post by natalia97)
    ask me anything.
    Im chill so ask away.
    Im knows as the relationship guru.
    Adventurous in what way lol?
    Describe a typical day?
    I'm not a relationship guru, but I think I give good advice
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    A relation ~ can be reflexive, symmetric or transitive. If it is all 3 then it is called an equivalence relation.

    If a relation is reflexive if for values a, then a~a.

    If a relation is symmetric, then for some values a and b, if a~b, then b~a.

    If a relation is transitive, then for some values a, b and c, if a~b and b~c then a~c.

    But what is '~'? It's just.. some property, I suppose.
    For example, if you had a class full of people and defined ~ as 'has the same birthday as' then the 'objects' a,b,c are the people in the class.

    a~a means that a has the same birthday as a, which means it has the same birthday as itself.. so if your birthday is on some date then you have the same birthday as yourself. (So it is reflexive).

    a~b means that a has the same birthday as b. If that is true, then b has the same birthday as a so b~a, and so a~b implies that b~a and so it is symmetric.

    If a~b and b~c then a has the same birthday as b and b has the same birthday as c, so a must have the same birthday as c so a~c. So it is transitive.

    So 'has the same birthday as' is an equivalence relation.
    If you actually wrote this down then I applaud you .
    Uh this is confusing, glad I didn't read it all. You're seriously a Maths geek right?
 
 
 
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