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Politics in schools Watch

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    Why isn't politics properly taught in schools? I've never had a proper lesson about it in my whole school career, and now I'm at university it seems most people haven't either. It's such an important subject, but most of my friends don't care about it at all, and think it's very boring and unimportant.

    I am thinking of starting an e-petition to make it a compulsory part of the curriculum - any joiners?
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    keeping the working class uninterested keeps the tories in power, i will sign your petition lad
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    (Original post by ACJHealy)
    I believe it's something that one should self-teach, or something that parents should teach. The curriculum is busy enough. Personally, on the insistence of my father, I've been watching PMQs and Question Time for over ten years (I'm 18) as well keeping up-to-date generally and I find myself well informed.
    I think you're right in a sense that opinions should be individually found, but the fact remains that not enough people do or will self-teach politics, or have parents who will teach their children it such as yours. And on such an important issue, it should be taught in school. The curriculum is busy, but some space should still be found for this.
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    (Original post by mangala)
    keeping the working class uninterested keeps the tories in power, i will sign your petition lad
    This, basically.

    There needs to be A LOT more teaching of politics in schools, especially state. I had never come across politics in its own right in school, only in the context of literature
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    (Original post by ACJHealy)
    I would worry though about the power in the hands of the teacher. Classes of little marxists would be most concerning.
    Yes, it would have to be closely regulated to be neutral, but anything is better than nothing!
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    (Original post by enaayrah)
    This, basically.

    There needs to be A LOT more teaching of politics in schools, especially state. I had never come across politics in its own right in school, only in the context of literature
    neither did i, it's ridiculous when you consider how it is such an integral part of the way the world functions, yet a detailed analysis of Of Mice and Men is deemed more important
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    I wouldn't trust the curriculum - set by the government - to be impartial about teaching about the government.
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    They should scrap crap like CPSHE and replace it with politics.
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    (Original post by ACJHealy)
    I'm not so sure. I think for the masses and the less intellectuals, ignorance is bliss. If they're all informed, they're more likely to kick up a fuss about each policy or action the government might make, making change impossible.
    I'm afraid I'll disagree with you on that point - it seems quite an elitist approach to democracy, defeating the whole point of the word. What happens when 'the masses and less intellectuals' can't and don't vote? You get an government that only represents a small minority of the population, i.e. not students!
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    Idk about other schools but at mine General Studies is compulsory and we have to do half a term on politics then but it doesn't teach us a lot we wouldn't already know as long as we read the news and stuff :/ loads of people take Politics for Alevel but it's not compulsory so it's mainly people who already knew a lot or thought it would be an easy subject and did't want to do anything else. I wish it was taught more but at least having to find out for yourself helps make it your own opinion you end up learning.
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    (Original post by cookieanon)
    Why isn't politics properly taught in schools? I've never had a proper lesson about it in my whole school career, and now I'm at university it seems most people haven't either. It's such an important subject, but most of my friends don't care about it at all, and think it's very boring and unimportant.

    I am thinking of starting an e-petition to make it a compulsory part of the curriculum - any joiners?
    Because Teachers are, in general, in unions. They are therefore inherently biased. Therefore, people prefer that people educate themselves through the media. (I am 16) Most of my friends see politics as too important, they assume it's the government's fault for everything, and not their fault.
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    (Original post by balanced)
    Because Teachers are, in general, in unions. They are therefore inherently biased. Therefore, people prefer that people educate themselves through the media. (I am 16) Most of my friends see politics as too important, they assume it's the government's fault for everything, and not their fault.
    But they are also professional people who value individual opinion, and therefore most would be able to set aside their own political persuasions to educate their students. The fact that people are assuming everything is the government's fault is a point in favour of educating them that it is in fact more complicated than that!
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    Children should not be taught politics at all. The propensity for bias is way, way, way too high (even if you leave party politics out of it).
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    (Original post by cookieanon)
    Why isn't politics properly taught in schools? I've never had a proper lesson about it in my whole school career, and now I'm at university it seems most people haven't either. It's such an important subject, but most of my friends don't care about it at all, and think it's very boring and unimportant.

    I am thinking of starting an e-petition to make it a compulsory part of the curriculum - any joiners?
    The less the plebs know the better.


    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    Children should not be taught politics at all. The propensity for bias is way, way, way too high (even if you leave party politics out of it).
    Why? By your logic we shouldn't teach virtually every single humanities subject.You may as well say children should not be taught history, which is a joke. In the same way we teach children historiography as part of history we should teach politics. Not teaching children history for fear of bias is far more damaging to society than not teaching it. The key it to follow enlightenment values center around rationality and pluralism.

    If you are that concerned of bias (which is a good concern) then teach children analytical philosophy. Teach them how to be criticle.

    I suspect it is more down to how wanting to give children those kinds of critical skills. It would be a lot harder to sell the ******** equating of household finance with a nations finance if children were taught rudimentary economics.

    (Original post by balanced)
    Because Teachers are, in general, in unions. They are therefore inherently biased. Therefore, people prefer that people educate themselves through the media. (I am 16) Most of my friends see politics as too important, they assume it's the government's fault for everything, and not their fault.
    Which is full of bias. Should we rely on solely the media when it comes to sex education? On science?

    So they are in unions. Why are you into in a union? will you be in a union? Why are you so biased against unions? Why do you assume your position is the "correct" one?

    (Original post by Drewski)
    I wouldn't trust the curriculum - set by the government - to be impartial about teaching about the government.
    Why do you trust the goverment to not ensure citizens are aware of how the government works?

    Keeping people ignorant can be just as dangerous and deliberate as governmental brain washing.
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    (Original post by cookieanon)
    But they are also professional people who value individual opinion, and therefore most would be able to set aside their own political persuasions to educate their students. The fact that people are assuming everything is the government's fault is a point in favour of educating them that it is in fact more complicated than that!
    The teachers I have come across do not value personal opinion, for example, my debating teacher banned those who said they supported UKIP. They are hardly impartial, one of my teachers says 'we' when referring to the Labour party.
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    (Original post by balanced)
    The teachers I have come across do not value personal opinion, for example, my debating teacher banned those who said they supported UKIP. They are hardly impartial, one of my teachers says 'we' when referring to the Labour party.
    I disagree with you there. Yes, valid point about the individual teachers who are biased, but is that a reason not to educate young people about politics? Surely if they are inflicting their political bias anyway without politics classes, such lessons can only help inform us. And if they are taught by people with passion for the subject, all the better.
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    Another thing to pack into an overly filled curriculum? No thanks!

    That's without the obvious issues of bias


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    (Original post by paul514)
    Another thing to pack into an overly filled curriculum? No thanks!

    That's without the obvious issues of bias


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    Another very important thing! If young people aren't educated about it, then what's going to happen to the country in the future?
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    Just watch the news, don't you? It's not too hard.
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    Just watch the news, don't you? It's not too hard.
    Yes, but lots of people don't! And they don't know what the impact of not watching it is.
 
 
 
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