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Politics in schools Watch

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    (Original post by cookieanon)
    Yes, but lots of people don't! And they don't know what the impact of not watching it is.
    The impact is very little. It simply means they can't have an argument with people in the pub about what the Lib–Dem's manifesto truly means.

    At school, I had citizenship classes which taught us about the political system and critical bias within it. Does that not continue?
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    The impact is very little. It simply means they can't have an argument with people in the pub about what the Lib–Dem's manifesto truly means.

    At school, I had citizenship classes which taught us about the political system and critical bias within it. Does that not continue?
    Surely the impact is that they don't know or care about the political system enough to vote. I am unaware about citizenship classes.
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    (Original post by cookieanon)
    Surely the impact is that they don't know or care about the political system enough to vote. I am unaware about citizenship classes.
    If people don't know enough to vote, it's a reflection of our political system.

    The power of the people is to perform "tyrannicide" when a political leader becomes too powerful or does something too extreme. When that time is needed, the newspapers and YouTubers will be crying from the rooftops and the voter will know when to take off the head of Caesar. However, for meaninful day-to-day participation few have adequate access to the political system to understand it for themselves. They'll listen to their mate Billy who is showing them that a political leader can't eat a bacon sandwich, and they'll listen to the Daily Mail or the Express who'll tell them what the Opposition are rallying about and consequently dismiss the premise of the rally, and then they'll listen to Channel 4 News who'll cut out 99.9% of the things discussed in Commons on a given day and deliver a summative 5-second sound bite.

    All these things limit almost exclusively access and by extension exclude the electorate from meaningful day-to-day participation in politics. This is how democracy works, unfortunately.
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    I think that politics should be taught in schools. Also I believe that economics should be taught as well.
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    (Original post by LordMallard)
    I think that politics should be taught in schools. Also I believe that economics should be taught as well.
    To be honest I have to agree with the comments already saying that the curriculum is packed enough as it is... besides, the majority of teachers would end up teaching from a very pro-Labour party perspective and kids are known to be more gullible than most so they'd probably take a lot of that bias in unquestioningly; it wouldn't be a very objective education in politics.

    As far as I'm aware PSHE (basically citizenship) lessons are supposed to cover things like politics but in my experience that really wasn't the case. It would be fantastic if they did actually teach kids how political systems work and, in an unbiased why, what each party traditionally stood for; simply talking about the structure of parliament and the voting system can't really be affected by teachers' opinions since it's just facts, and then allow the students to explore more about the political parties themselves in their own time where they can make an independent judgement come voting time.

    This really couldn't be that difficult to do- we had PSHE once a week and I get the impression most schools have something similar fairly regularly, so it could just occupy that slot for half a term or so.

    In regards to economics, though... it's probably better to leave that until college XD
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    (Original post by cookieanon)
    Another very important thing! If young people aren't educated about it, then what's going to happen to the country in the future?
    Then it will go on as it is because people aren't educated now


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    (Original post by cookieanon)
    Yes, but lots of people don't! And they don't know what the impact of not watching it is.
    If people don't get that every law in the country is set by people they elect (eu aside) and that has direct implications about things that have affected them, are affecting them now or may effect them in the future that's their own stupidity.


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    (Original post by paul514)
    Another thing to pack into an overly filled curriculum? No thanks!

    That's without the obvious issues of bias


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    What?

    Any other subjects you;d like to cull. History perhaps?
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    we did it for a bit in my general studies class but i dont think ik that much about politics tbh lol
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    This relates abit to biasness in schools and testifies to the Jewry engulfing schools. Students don't even know about how the old jews use to refuse that jesus was the messiah from god, and that THEY were the ones who crusified him. Instead the students watch videos about jewish rituals. UNBELIEVABLE JEWISH PROPAGANDA, i remember it in school, and i know that this makes me look like a crazy antisemite, but its true to be honest. and im not anitsemetic
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    What?

    Any other subjects you;d like to cull. History perhaps?
    Well firstly the subject doesn't exist on mass right now so it's more about not introducing it.

    But off topic yea history could go.

    If people want to study it that's what a levels and degrees are for.


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    (Original post by Labradoodles)
    To be honest I have to agree with the comments already saying that the curriculum is packed enough as it is... besides, the majority of teachers would end up teaching from a very pro-Labour party perspective and kids are known to be more gullible than most so they'd probably take a lot of that bias in unquestioningly; it wouldn't be a very objective education in politics.

    As far as I'm aware PSHE (basically citizenship) lessons are supposed to cover things like politics but in my experience that really wasn't the case. It would be fantastic if they did actually teach kids how political systems work and, in an unbiased why, what each party traditionally stood for; simply talking about the structure of parliament and the voting system can't really be affected by teachers' opinions since it's just facts, and then allow the students to explore more about the political parties themselves in their own time where they can make an independent judgement come voting time.

    This really couldn't be that difficult to do- we had PSHE once a week and I get the impression most schools have something similar fairly regularly, so it could just occupy that slot for half a term or so.

    In regards to economics, though... it's probably better to leave that until college XD

    I think that it should be in PSHE, I was only thinking that they should have one lesson a fortnight, just to give them an insight. Also economics isn't compulsory, so I think that they should have at least a few economics at school, just to give a basic understanding. It may stop them from thinking that the Green Party is always correct.
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    (Original post by paul514)
    Well firstly the subject doesn't exist on mass right now so it's more about not introducing it.

    But off topic yea history could go.

    If people want to study it that's what a levels and degrees are for.


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    lol
 
 
 
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