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    Hi

    I am currently thinking of applying to Dentistry in 2017, and would like to hear from current dentists or dental students about their outlook on the future of dentistry and where they see the career in the 5-20 years.

    Also If some of the dentists could be so kind to inform me on:

    1.How long they have been in their career
    2.Their working hours
    3.salary sorry if this is rude
    4.The type of work/procedures they carry out
    5.Do they enjoy their career and what satisfies them
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    Off topic but are you taking a gap year to be applying in 2017?

    (Original post by Anonymous5000)
    Hi

    I am currently thinking of applying to Dentistry in 2017, and would like to hear from current dentists or dental students about their outlook on the future of dentistry and where they see the career in the 5-20 years.

    Also If some of the dentists could be so kind to inform me on:

    1.How long they have been in their career
    2.Their working hours
    3.salary sorry if this is rude
    4.The type of work/procedures they carry out
    5.Do they enjoy their career and what satisfies them
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    (Original post by student__1001)
    Off topic but are you taking a gap year to be applying in 2017?
    No I'm currently in my fifth year of high school in Scotland. I will be applying in 2016 for entry in 2017
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    If there are any current dental student, please could you contribute to this thread, im sure all us aspiring student would appreciate it
    Thanks
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    The future of Dentistry is interesting...

    There'll probably be too many qualified dentists (more unemployment)
    Dentist pay will continue to decline
    the rise of corporates buying up practices will mean working as an associate for longer
    Could always go into a specialty training pathway - more $$$, highly competitive, etc.

    It is quite bleak but what it is what you make of it. Most people I talk to are only interested in the money.
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    (Original post by Anonymous5000)
    Hi

    I am currently thinking of applying to Dentistry in 2017, and would like to hear from current dentists or dental students about their outlook on the future of dentistry and where they see the career in the 5-20 years.

    Also If some of the dentists could be so kind to inform me on:

    1.How long they have been in their career
    2.Their working hours
    3.salary sorry if this is rude
    4.The type of work/procedures they carry out
    5.Do they enjoy their career and what satisfies them
    Dear Anonymous and others
    I have come across this website while exploring career options for my daughter. Out of curiosity I browsed dentistry section (I am a dentist) and after reading this discussion I registered on here to be able to reply.
    I been trained abroad , in Britain I been practising for more then a decade. I love my job but I have deep reservations in recommending it. The landscape of dentistry changed a lot in the last decade in the UK.
    So replying your questions :
    With regards to salary - suppose one can calculate it roughly as £50 000 for working 5 days a week 9-5.
    Procedures - general dentistry procedures - examinations, fillings, extractions, root canal treatments , crowns , dentures is the usual.
    So how come I love my job but do not recommend it :
    - I happened to be a dentist by chance , I have not put a lot of effort into being specifically a dentist and have not paid tuition fees. As I far as I can see dentistry career in the UK is insanely difficult to get into so effort and the expense it puts one into( loss of earnings for 5 years , tuition fees) make me question whether it is justified. For a very bright determined person one has to be to do dentistry here there must be other more appealing options.
    - Money. I know I written "50 000" which may seem a lot. Keep in mind though that it is not "salary" as most dentists are self employed You would have to pay about £ 4 grand a year in different fees just for a privilege to be working. Do not forget this is gross number , ie before tax.
    - Morale. This one is probably most important. Dentists are heavily reliant on NHS for their income. NHS budget is limited. Hospital trusts and big department of health figures recently started to admit openly treatment they can provide on the NHS is limited now. Dentists can not do that though ; if they do they will face the wrath of disciplinary procedures and have their career finished. Dental contract states they are meant to provide all clinically necessary work for a fixed amount of money which is ridiculously low. If one was to follow that rule absolutely one would not earn 50 000 ; one could may be earn minimal wage. Or not get paid at all or even pay out of their own pocket for working. Clearly situation is absurd - imagine a car dealer who is under obligation to sell all cars for £4000 say. The result is every dentist draws their own line in the sand and the more conscientious they are the less they earn. Do you want to be part of it ?
    Regulations and compliance industry have grown at an alarming rate, I believe comoliance expenses increased 100 times imnthe last 10 years. There are so many rules and regulations, often overlappingand dublicating that typically practising dentist just gives up trying to keep up with them and lives in fear to have their livelihood lost due to not complying with something. Older dentists are retiring s soon as they can ( it will not be an option to you as the rules on NHS pension age changed radically last year so you would have to work to state retiring age which likely would be 70+ by the time you get there). Younger ones often emigrate. Public is not symphatetic to dentist's plights, dentists are seen as cash cows by dealers and resented by general public. You would have to declare any convictions to GDC, drink driving for example would probably terminate your career and you can face disciplinary procedures for about anything "bringing profession into disrepute" - having an affair for example or making homophobic statements on facebook.
    - It is highly physically demanding work. If you are an accountant you can still work with arthritis or osteochondrosis for example . If you are a dentist you are finished if your finger do not haventhe same dexterity or neck has required range of movement.

    Hope it made you think. I know if your eyes are firmly set on dentistry my words aee not going to change it. The above is written mostly for ones who are undecided yet.
 
 
 
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