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Will a person always be poor if they are born poor? Watch

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    A bit of a silly question in all honesty, of course not.

    You know unless your extremely luck you don't just 'become rich'. Although in this day and age if you inherit vast wealth from your parents then that helps. Nevertheless, everyone must have been poor at some point. Many poor people become rich. Simple. So no.

    Just look at various individuals: you will find thousands of them.
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    (Original post by urbanlocations)
    Bill Gates: Dropped out of education
    Virgin Media Owner: Lower class family
    Steve jobs: Quit education.
    Alan Sugar: Left school.

    All these multimillionaires started from nothing or very little. Work hard at school, college, university and you will go places.

    I love this
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    A working class individual in the UK is rich compared to a working class individual in, for instance, India. Assuming that you do live in the UK, a lack of opportunity is no excuse. Even in India it would be a poor excuse, as a rapidly growing economy. If you lived in the Central African Republic, that would be a different matter.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm feeling really down and reflective at the moment- and it just popped into my head that maybe I'll always be poor. I was born into a working class family, but not exactly a prosperous one. My question is, without considering those unusually lucky individuals, will I always work a dead-end job, or be struggling to live?

    I know that all of this depends upon different variables like education and providing skills employers want. Thats just it, I'm not particularly good at the things employers want. Soft skills are terrible- with the exception of English and written comms (which is very good). I have interests in the creative arts (which doesn't pay so well), and I'm not super talented. I have a degree in design, so I'm not exactly uneducated- (although most of my qualifications lean towards the creative arts).

    What can I do to improve my situation?

    My question was both philosophical and pragmatic in nature. Any responses welcomed.
    Not at all. I am living proof that poor people can be successful.

    I grew up in a really run down area, it's one of Britain's equivalents of a slum. Crime rates are really high there and everything about the area in general is just awful. I went to the worst achieving school in my county - a school so backwards and rubbish that while other kids were learning maths we were still being taught the different colours! There were no expectations for any of us to do well in life. No one encouraged us because no one believed that we slum-town kids could ever achieve as much as richer kids. Everyone living there had completely given up on life - it was a totally depressing environment.

    It sounds like a hole you can never get out of doesn't it? However, if you put your heart and soul into something you can always find a way to achieve it. I was (and still am) determined to get out of that dump and make something of my life. So determined in fact, that I am prepared to go through hell and back for an infinite number of times in order to achieve it, I don't allow anything to stand in my way. Unlike the other kids I spent every moment of my free time studying and experimenting with some rather mundane objects to discover how the world works for myself. The other kids spent their time playing and later getting high/drunk instead.

    You'd be surprised at how much you can learn from the simplest of objects, even things like twigs and rocks. Doing this I was able to supplement my education and by the time I'd reached high school entry I was not only able to secure a place at one of the best grammar schools in the country, but was also several years ahead in my science classes. So while I went on to such an amazing school, the other kids in my area were stuck at a dumpy comprehensive. We'd all had the same start in life, the only difference was that I had (and have) the ambition and determination needed to get to higher places whereas they don't and gave up on life. Now, I'm about to take my A2's and will hopefully be going off to study chemical physics at the University of Bristol in September this year. Most of the other kids haven't even applied to polytechnics.

    What I'm trying to say is that if you let life get you down you'll never get anywhere, but if you stick your middle finger up at life and keep trying no matter what happens to you, you will be successful.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    It depends on the individual but most people born in deprived areas remain there until they die, they simply lack ambition to do well, smoke weed, drink and are most likely to have chronic diseases.
    Well to be fair, poverty can be quite crushing of one's self esteem and aspiration, so it's understandable that many give in to it. Those of us from that environment with the support and/or opportunity to pursue educating our way out of poverty are extremely fortunate.
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    (Original post by CCC75)
    Well to be fair, poverty can be quite crushing of one's self esteem and aspiration, so it's understandable that many give in to it. Those of us from that environment with the support and/or opportunity to pursue educating our way out of poverty are extremely fortunate.
    Yeah, that is true.

    Poverty/lack of money is a limitation but thank God in the UK education is free up until the age of 18.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Yeah, that is true.

    Poverty/lack of money is a limitation but thank God in the UK education is free up until the age of 18.
    'Free' does not always denote a product of adequate quality though. Like a pp above, I experienced schooling where because of where I came from the teaching staff decided I was not worthy of their efforts. I was a high achieving primary school pupil, that had to sit a test to gain access to a high performing secondary, only to find that the middle classes - both pupils and teaching staff - were not at all pleased to see me there.

    My response was to give in fighting them and give up. I only became motivated to pursue academic qualifications afer school. If I wasn't the doggedly determined individual that I am, I would likely be blowing trees, getting drunk and getting fat like other 'underclass' individuals.
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    (Original post by CCC75)
    'Free' does not always denote a product of adequate quality though. Like a pp above, I experienced schooling where because of where I came from the teaching staff decided I was not worthy of their efforts. I was a high achieving primary school pupil, that had to sit a test to gain access to a high performing secondary, only to find that the middle classes - both pupils and teaching staff - were not at all pleased to see me there.

    My response was to give in fighting them and give up. I only became motivated to pursue academic qualifications afer school. If I wasn't the doggedly determined individual that I am, I would likely be blowing trees, getting drunk and getting fat like other 'underclass' individuals.
    I guess that is a factor.
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    No.
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    Yes it's highly likely in Britain, this country is obsessed with class
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    If one is born poor, they are more likely to remain poor but not all poor people remain poor
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    (Original post by urbanlocations)
    Bill Gates: Dropped out of education
    Virgin Media Owner: Lower class family
    Steve jobs: Quit education.
    Alan Sugar: Left school.

    All these multimillionaires started from nothing or very little. Work hard at school, college, university and you will go places.
    Don't know about others, but Gates and Jobs quit education because they were making so much money and were so intelligent that it made no sense for them to continue to study.
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    (Original post by CCC75)
    I would likely be blowing trees, getting drunk and getting fat like other 'underclass' individuals.
    blowing trees ;-)

    i can just imagine it?

    ;-)
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    Poor people born in working class families will not alway stay poor but can never be upper class unless they marry into upper class or are born straight into it!


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    (Original post by urbanlocations)
    Bill Gates: Dropped out of education
    Virgin Media Owner: Lower class family
    Steve jobs: Quit education.
    Alan Sugar: Left school.

    All these multimillionaires started from nothing or very little. Work hard at school, college, university and you will go places.
    Don't you think this is a bit contradictory?

    You are saying that these people dropped out of education yet we're very successful anyway but then afterwards, you say that if you "work hard" at school/university, you will "go places".

    I absolutely agree with working hard at school but I'm just a bit confused about what your point is here.
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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    Not at all. I am living proof that poor people can be successful.

    I grew up in a really run down area, it's one of Britain's equivalents of a slum. Crime rates are really high there and everything about the area in general is just awful. I went to the worst achieving school in my county - a school so backwards and rubbish that while other kids were learning maths we were still being taught the different colours! There were no expectations for any of us to do well in life. No one encouraged us because no one believed that we slum-town kids could ever achieve as much as richer kids. Everyone living there had completely given up on life - it was a totally depressing environment.

    It sounds like a hole you can never get out of doesn't it? However, if you put your heart and soul into something you can always find a way to achieve it. I was (and still am) determined to get out of that dump and make something of my life. So determined in fact, that I am prepared to go through hell and back for an infinite number of times in order to achieve it, I don't allow anything to stand in my way. Unlike the other kids I spent every moment of my free time studying and experimenting with some rather mundane objects to discover how the world works for myself. The other kids spent their time playing and later getting high/drunk instead.

    You'd be surprised at how much you can learn from the simplest of objects, even things like twigs and rocks. Doing this I was able to supplement my education and by the time I'd reached high school entry I was not only able to secure a place at one of the best grammar schools in the country, but was also several years ahead in my science classes. So while I went on to such an amazing school, the other kids in my area were stuck at a dumpy comprehensive. We'd all had the same start in life, the only difference was that I had (and have) the ambition and determination needed to get to higher places whereas they don't and gave up on life. Now, I'm about to take my A2's and will hopefully be going off to study chemical physics at the University of Bristol in September this year. Most of the other kids haven't even applied to polytechnics.

    What I'm trying to say is that if you let life get you down you'll never get anywhere, but if you stick your middle finger up at life and keep trying no matter what happens to you, you will be successful.
    I really admire your attitude and I think its great that you've achieved some much given your circumstances. Despite the tone of this thread, I have achieved a lot myself, and while my situation isn't identical to yours- I pretty much came from having had no expectations placed on me in early years; I was born disabled, wheel-chair bound, told I'm never walk again, would never go to mainstream school and never attain anything intellectually (end up in a special needs school), and end up on benefits. Boy did I prove them all wrong. I overcame all odds, slowly worked my way up to walking by age 5/6, and while I went to a dump comprehensive and failed my GCSEs (practically) I retook a number of them. Went onto college, studied hard, and went to university. Sure I never went to a Russel Group uni- however, I actually gained entry to my firm choice- then dropped out due to depression- reapplied and got in again the follow year elsewhere.

    Moral of the story is I had a lot of resilience and self-belief. I think my thread is more a concern for inequality and the class system. Sometimes it still bothers me a bit, despite the fact I am relatively positive, I just get so hung up by it.

    If your interested here is my story in relation to what I discussed: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3849851
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    Not if they graft really hard, take every opportunity to teach themselves what they need to know and are filled with a relentless self-confidence that nobody can affect.
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    (Original post by IanDangerously)
    Not if they graft really hard, take every opportunity to teach themselves what they need to know and are filled with a relentless self-confidence that nobody can affect.
    three words:
    1 social mobility
    2 financial literacy
    3 education
    4 social networking

    opps that's 4. never mind
 
 
 
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