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    What made you realise you wanted to do a masters?

    Any advice for undergrads thinking about doing one....?
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    What made you realise you wanted to do a masters?

    Any advice for undergrads thinking about doing one....?
    I wanted some of dat LSE prestige
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    Do you need it for your career?
    if you're doing it out of interest or for personal development, how interested are you in the subject and does the masters give you what you want?
    Can you afford it?
    Do you have the time to make the best of it?
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    There's nothing wrong with doing education for a love of education. Just be sure that it can be difficult to fund a second postgraduate course once you've had funding to do one.

    A masters can provide scope to change into a different subject area from undergraduate.

    A masters may not provide a financial return on your investment. It is important to enjoy the process because of the commitment required. In this regard I wouldn't recommend doing a masters if you find yourself doing it through gritted teeth.
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    In my case it's a doctorate programme. It has long been part of my planned career progression. I looked into all options of achieving where I want to be career wise and a doctorate is my stepping stone to that place.
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    My decision to embark upon further study stemmed from my immense interest in the subject, the reputation of the course (and of the institution), my love for challenges and my ultimate goal to secure a career in academia

    Having said that, postgraduate courses also serve the purpose of making your CV stand out in a competitive job market, so it's definitely an option worth considering even if you don't want to do a PhD etc (especially if you enjoyed your undergrad course)
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    My Masters expanded on a specialist corner of my undergrad degree. The course content fascinated me and also seemed like a useful way of making myself more employable.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Do you need it for your career?
    if you're doing it out of interest or for personal development, how interested are you in the subject and does the masters give you what you want?
    Do you have the time to make the best of it?
    The Master's program I went through focused upon an area most undergraduate degrees don't focus upon, provided the opportunity to get qualified for a professional certificate, and learn about a few others. The program also provided a fast track method for another professional qualification. It is in a field that is becoming increasingly relevant.

    Most of my classmates did it for their careers, although some aren't in the same field anymore. In a way, the Master's program was tailored as an extension of their undergraduate degrees. Having a Master's degree does open up a few more doors for a employment, and typically ensures a faster track for promotion when compared to a Bachelor's.

    I took the program out of interest, although having the backup options built in didn't hurt in choosing it. I ended up in a PhD program after the Master's finished. The degree may become useful in the future, but it depends on whether I wish to pursue a career in industry, corporate, or stay in academia.
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    (Original post by Indeterminate)
    My decision to embark upon further study stemmed from my immense interest in the subject, the reputation of the course (and of the institution), my love for challenges and my ultimate goal to secure a career in academia

    Having said that, postgraduate courses also serve the purpose of making your CV stand out in a competitive job market, so it's definitely an option worth considering even if you don't want to do a PhD etc (especially if you enjoyed your undergrad course)
    Not strictly true
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    Personally I wasn't ready to go into work. I also had a specific interest in policies and the EU already so I knew I wanted to do a Masters Degree in International Public Policy. In the area I'm trying to break into, most people have a Masters as well. I should stress this is a small area, and having a masters degree wont necessarily make you more employable.
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    (Original post by zombiejon)
    The Master's program I went through focused upon an area most undergraduate degrees don't focus upon, provided the opportunity to get qualified for a professional certificate, and learn about a few others. The program also provided a fast track method for another professional qualification. It is in a field that is becoming increasingly relevant.

    Most of my classmates did it for their careers, although some aren't in the same field anymore. In a way, the Master's program was tailored as an extension of their undergraduate degrees. Having a Master's degree does open up a few more doors for a employment, and typically ensures a faster track for promotion when compared to a Bachelor's.

    I took the program out of interest, although having the backup options built in didn't hurt in choosing it. I ended up in a PhD program after the Master's finished. The degree may become useful in the future, but it depends on whether I wish to pursue a career in industry, corporate, or stay in academia.
    Sorry why the quote? Not sure if you have a question or what it is? I was advising the op of questions to ask themselves when thinking about whether or not to do a masters degree
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Sorry why the quote? Not sure if you have a question or what it is? I was advising the op of questions to ask themselves when thinking about whether or not to do a masters degree
    Ah. Wasn't sure if you were asking the original poster, of those of us who went through a Master's program.
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    Quite honestly, I always found myself drifting towards the history section in Waterstone's. I was fascinated by economic history, in particular and just knew that it's what I wanted to spend a year doing.

    Do what you enjoy. Far too many people say do STEM or something 'useful', but if I'm going to spend £30,000 doing a subject, I want to make sure it's something I really love.
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    - was genuinely excited about the course, like was reading up on modules excited - it combined what I studied in my free time with my favourite modules during undergrad.

    - I wanted to take a sharp turn from a very niche engineering course to financial risk analysis, despite what people might say unless you go to a target this does hurt your chances.

    - The prestige of Imperial will most certainly boost my CV, and make me more attractive for employers in the city.

    -Prestige didn't really come into the equation when I was applying though and I was initially annoyed that only Imperial offered this course as I would be waiting a year to apply to a course which frankly I thought I had little to no chance of getting into.

    - You will be shelling out alot of money for your masters unless you have a wealthy family make sure you'll get a good ROI from your masters (not saying STEM, but don't to an MSc in McDonalds studies just because you wanr a masters) also don't do a masters unless you absolutely need to for your chosen career path they really aren't neccesary (though I see them being the norm in a few years)
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    - You will be shelling out alot of money for your masters unless you have a wealthy family make sure you'll get a good ROI
    Alternatively, understand your chosen field in advance. A Masters isn't necessarily about earning more money - there are still relatively few fields for which a Masters is essential, although this may be on the increase (I haven't seen any stats on it).

    If your Masters isn't about making more money (highly unlikely in my field, which financially rewards professional experience and seniority rather than qualifications), make sure that you can get what you want from the course. If you're doing it for the joy of learning - which *is* an option even if you don't have a rich family - pick a course which really rings your bell. If you want to be more employable (there's a difference between earning power and employability), make sure there's a genuine need for people with that specialism. In my field it's easy to choose the "wrong" Masters and not use it once you've graduated.

    Ultimately it's buyer beware. Unis will sell you the Masters courses they run and not necessarily the ones which might be the best for your personal situation or aspirations.
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    its been a plan of mine to go on to my masters and then stop there
    has anyone got any advice on what a masters degree is like whilst studying? ie workload? etc
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Alternatively, understand your chosen field in advance. A Masters isn't necessarily about earning more money - there are still relatively few fields for which a Masters is essential, although this may be on the increase (I haven't seen any stats on it).

    If your Masters isn't about making more money (highly unlikely in my field, which financially rewards professional experience and seniority rather than qualifications), make sure that you can get what you want from the course. If you're doing it for the joy of learning - which *is* an option even if you don't have a rich family - pick a course which really rings your bell. If you want to be more employable (there's a difference between earning power and employability), make sure there's a genuine need for people with that specialism. In my field it's easy to choose the "wrong" Masters and not use it once you've graduated.

    Ultimately it's buyer beware. Unis will sell you the Masters courses they run and not necessarily the ones which might be the best for your personal situation or aspirations.
    Fantastic post. I'm with you on this.

    I had gone into my undergraduate focusing only on becoming more employable (I'm from a country where major means A LOT), with little to no emphasis on experience. Having now worked for many years, I actually thought to myself that I wanted to study something that made me happy (especially as I'm paying for it). For too often, we focus on what will help us get a better job, and are willing to shell out £30,000 for an MSc from the LSE or £100,000 for an MBA from INSEAD without actually realising the ROI this will bring and whether it's actually necessary.

    Experience and network goes a long way when looking for work and climbing the corporate ladder and therefore earning a higher salary.
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    (Original post by shawtyb)
    its been a plan of mine to go on to my masters and then stop there
    has anyone got any advice on what a masters degree is like whilst studying? ie workload? etc
    This depends on a number of factors, e.g. university, course, aims, etc..
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    Doing an Engineering degree, the integrated masters option is significantly more desirable than simply doing the three year BEng. It opens up the door to becoming a chartered engineer (CEng), and many employers will only take masters graduates...

    So basically choosing the 4-year MEng was a no-brainer :cute:
 
 
 
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