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Should students HAVE to pay back university loans? Watch

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    (Original post by SubZero~)
    Given that it's a loan, it should be paid back eventually!
    Not if you don't earn enough. That's the system.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Not if you don't earn enough. That's the system.
    Oh I forgot to state that lel.
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    Your comment "they should have known about graduate employment" is amusing. Not every degree is designed to land you a job - some people undertake one because it's an interest or passion of theirs, not just to get a job. Furthermore, some of us have to do postgraduate education to make use of our undergraduate degree.

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    (Original post by TSRFT8)
    The majority are also the ones paying less than 21k, coincidence :/
    Source?

    Actually the average graduate starting salary is £28k
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-34186954
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    (Original post by TSRFT8)
    Do you even know how to read The study indicates employers in the accountancy or professional services sector continue to offer the highest proportion of graduate vacancies, at 23%." "followed by engineering or industrial companies (12%)." Which just validates my point of mickey mouse degrees being pointless, atleast you tried.
    Do you understand "average" and "majority"?
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    (Original post by Captivated)
    Your comment "they should have known about graduate employment" is amusing. Not every degree is designed to land you a job - some people undertake one because it's an interest or passion of theirs, not just to get a job. Furthermore, some of us have to do postgraduate education to make use of our undergraduate degree.

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    Those kind of people are the biggest problem, how can you justify costing the tax payer £60k because you had a "passion" for a useless degree, if you have a passion thats great but fund your own ******** dont cost the government and then 3 years down the line also claim job seekers as your degree did not get you a job.
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    (Original post by TSRFT8)
    Those kind of people are the biggest problem, how can you justify costing the tax payer £60k because you had a "passion" for a useless degree, if you have a passion thats great but fund your own ******** dont cost the government and then 3 years down the line also claim job seekers as your degree did not get you a job.
    I'd agree to some level. I think those kinds of degrees should be majorly limited from the number of places today.

    It's no good churning out many thousands of sociology graduates every year if you can put that funding to raising place numbers for things like engineering and medicine for example.

    That means you only get the cream of people doing a degree that doesn't have a big demand from the jobs market



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    (Original post by paul514)
    I'd agree to some level. I think those kinds of degrees should be majorly limited from the number of places today.

    It's no good churning out many thousands of sociology graduates every year if you can put that funding to raising place numbers for things like engineering and medicine for example.

    That means you only get the cream of people doing a degree that doesn't have a big demand from the jobs market
    There's no quota on engineering places. If unis want to have more engineering students they are free to do so. Medicine is the only course under quota, and that's set by the NHS not the universities. 45% of students are already doing STEM subjects.

    Less than 1 in 10 students study social sciences. And most of them go on to earn reasonable money.
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    Yes? That is kind of the point of a loan.
    It is like borrowing $100 from a loaner company and acting outraged that you have to pay for it back eventually.
    "Are they foreal? Expecting people to pay money after taking a loan?! Foreal?

    No one likes paying loans but that is pretty much the deal when you get a loan. If you don't pay back a loan, the company will just take it from you and if you do not like idea of paying money back and requesting loans then loan companies won't give you money at all.

    Don't you sign your name and a contract while getting loans? Then it means you have to pay it back.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    There's no quota on engineering places. If unis want to have more engineering students they are free to do so. Medicine is the only course under quota, and that's set by the NHS not the universities. 45% of students are already doing STEM subjects.

    Less than 1 in 10 students study social sciences. And most of them go on to earn reasonable money.
    Don't forget Dentistry.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    No, the point of university is to improve your ability to contribute to society. It is an incredibly depressing and narrow-minded point of view to assume that the only way you can contribute to society is through economic means.
    That's not the point of university.

    It's narrow minded to assume that the only point of a degree is to get 'transferable skills' and become 'marketable' and 'useful to society'.

    A degree should first and foremost be about education and acquiring specialist knowledge at a higher level. Whether you put into practice what you learn is totally up to you. People with degrees do not have improved abilities to 'contribute to society'. Define contributing to society? So many students get hit with the hard, cold spank of unemployment after they graduate because they feel entitled to a 'graduate job' just because they have a degree.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    There's no quota on engineering places. If unis want to have more engineering students they are free to do so. Medicine is the only course under quota, and that's set by the NHS not the universities. 45% of students are already doing STEM subjects.

    Less than 1 in 10 students study social sciences. And most of them go on to earn reasonable money.
    The point is if it is legislated then the numbers of people doing stem and other degrees with high real world need would go up.

    As for nhs targets on numbers for doctors etc this I believe is changing to train more people but through the loan system.

    I.e the moaning about doing away with bursaries for nursing


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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    No, the point of university is to improve your ability to contribute to society. It is an incredibly depressing and narrow-minded point of view to assume that the only way you can contribute to society is through economic means.
    Modern art majors checking bags and waitresses with gender studies degrees don't sound like particularly lucrative tax investments to me. But, like you say, I'm sure they are making very worthwhile contributions to society with their blogs and whatnot.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    Modern art majors checking bags and waitresses with gender studies degrees don't sound like particularly lucrative tax investments to me. But, like you say, I'm sure they are making very worthwhile contributions to society with their blogs and whatnot.
    Thanks for the feedback from Canada.

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    There is no logic to charging every university student 9,000 a year. Our French neighbours get by with a few hundred euros, as do the Germans, and I think every other civilised nation with the exception of the US which is probably the dumbest country on the planet in terms of social issues. In terms of science the UK should charge, because imo UK and US science colleges are often superior to European counterparts, but this is mainly just us flexing our muscles with prestige now, there are plenty of decent universities in mainland Europe that are a fraction of the price and are just as good.
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    (Original post by TSRFT8)
    Those kind of people are the biggest problem, how can you justify costing the tax payer £60k because you had a "passion" for a useless degree, if you have a passion thats great but fund your own ******** dont cost the government and then 3 years down the line also claim job seekers as your degree did not get you a job.
    What about people who do degrees that 'get you jobs' and end up without a job?
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    (Original post by Captivated)
    What about people who do degrees that 'get you jobs' and end up without a job?
    They don't exist, an unemployed engineer? 'Sacre-Bleu!'

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    The reason this forum sparked my interest as it has been spoken about recently in the media and as a young single mom it is having a psychological effect on me.

    I believe we should pay back the loans, I do, however, if universities weren't as expensive and got rewarded for giving people the best chance of employment AND a good degree, then it be easier for graduates to get a job and pay back loans. As it is 21,000 in today's age really is not a lot of money. It might be the most you have been ever paid in the beginning but if you want that mortgage and that car or to get married or pay for future children, it really isn't enough.

    People risk becoming university students with the hope and determination to get a better education to get a job not only that pays well (lets face it is what a lot of people think; "its easy" and they will be earning lots of money at the end of it) and a job they will enjoy doing and they can continue to learn and develop in their chosen field.

    I do not think some people should be allowed to go university because they come back from more money, who is to say that someone from benefits can not become the next best doctor? or find an answer to some of life's biggest problems?

    I do not think the amount should be dropped but I do believe people should be better educated in the understanding of what it means to become an university student. They are lots of benefits but it is a risk. Just because you did the degree whos to say you will get the career?
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    (Original post by Sephiroth)
    Students don't pay back university loans. Employed graduates with a decent salary pay back loans.

    Don't expect your loan to be written off if you never earn more than £21k because you will earn more than that. £21k will be minimum wage in 20 years time.
    In 20 years time it'll be written off..
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    30 years
 
 
 
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