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Should students HAVE to pay back university loans? Watch

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    mangala you still haven't provided any long-term trend data that shows declining participation amongst the poorest students. Because it doesn't exist.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    No it didn't. Student numbers have significantly increased.

    Attachment 508227
    But mature and part-time student numbers have dropped significantly. Somehow they always get left out of these debates.
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    (Original post by mangala)
    i said they were not properly funded, you disagreed and said it was because they had limited funding. ok buddy
    There is a difference between the Department of Education funding and the funding of the universities, you however seem to think they are the same.

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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    There is a difference between the Department of Education funding and the funding of the universities, you however seem to think they are the same.

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    good comeback mate proved me wrong
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    (Original post by mangala)
    of course no long term data exists when expensive university has only recently come in to existence you idiot
    It's not expensive. It's free unless you earn >£21k you idiot.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    It's not expensive. It's free unless you earn >£21k you idiot.
    For now. That could (and probably will) change. I would not be at all surprised if a future government retrospectively lowered the repayment threshold.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    For now. That could (and probably will) change. I would not be at all surprised if a future government retrospectively lowered the repayment threshold.
    Perhaps, but I think it's more likely they freeze it at this level - i.e. not increase it in line with inflation. It would cause too much outrage to actually lower it.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    No. It's literally a fact.

    £7.6k all-in before.

    £8.2k now.

    You're gonna need some special pair of glasses if you think you'll get less money hitting your account.

    Btw, most universities still offer grants to low income kids on top of the above. Check your facts before saying 'the only way I can afford it is if I get a scholarship because grants were scrapped'. All it does is make you look uninformed.


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    Indeed.


    mangala e.g. UoM up to £3,000 bursary per year for low income household students.
    http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/un...ips-bursaries/
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    (Original post by mangala)
    you do realise that university used to be free a few years ago, right?
    Effectively, yes: under the Education Act 1962, most students on full-time courses received, via their LEA, a national Mandatory Award, by which 1: their tuition fees (+ Students' Union subscription!) were paid directly to their Uni (many were not aware of this technicality and simply thought there were no fees -An idiot like yourself are included in such people) AND 2: they received a maintenance grant (inc an element for books etc) which was sufficient (if you were careful) to pay for accommodation and food. Thus ANYONE could afford to go to university, with only a bit of part-time work if you wanted more spending money. (There was some element of parental contribution to maintenance, depending on income, but everyone got the basic, and most students the full, amount.) Pretty much the same, so your point is irrelevant and quite frankly you are an idiot.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Perhaps, but I think it's more likely they freeze it at this level - i.e. not increase it in line with inflation. It would cause too much outrage to actually lower it.
    A freeze would have it being minimum wage for the threshold in a decade, give or take, for over 25s

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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    A freeze would have it being minimum wage for the threshold in a decade, give or take, for over 25s

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    Which, controversially, might be fair enough. If a degree helps takes your earnings above the minimum wage then you start to repay it.

    Although in practice I doubt they will freeze it for a decade.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Which, controversially, might be fair enough. If a degree helps takes your earnings above the minimum wage then you start to repay it.

    Although in practice I doubt they will freeze it for a decade.
    No, it will probably be increased in line with inflation, but that still puts the balance point at around about 2030

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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    You mean nearly two decades ago when it was pretty much only the elite allowed to go who were generally wealthy to begin with
    Well I'm 31 and all the 18/19 year olds who went to uni when I was that age had no tuition fees so that's one decade not two


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    (Original post by jneill)
    Which, controversially, might be fair enough. If a degree helps takes your earnings above the minimum wage then you start to repay it.

    Although in practice I doubt they will freeze it for a decade.
    Funny thing is with automation speeding up almost everyone won't pay it back


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    (Original post by paul514)
    Funny thing is with automation speeding up almost everyone won't pay it back


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    If automation becomes that good we'll all be like:

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    (Original post by paul514)
    Well I'm 31 and all the 18/19 year olds who went to uni when I was that age had no tuition fees so that's one decade not two


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    Which is trivially false. The Teaching and Higher Education Act 1998 was enacted on the 16th July 1998, and it was the act of parliament introducing tuition fees across the whole of the UK, which was 18 years ago.

    The Higher Education Act 2004 increased fess to £3000 for those starting in 2006-7, so a decade ago they were £3000.

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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Which is trivially false. The Teaching and Higher Education Act 1998 was enacted on the 16th July 1998, and it was the act of parliament introducing tuition fees across the whole of the UK, which was 18 years ago.

    The Higher Education Act 2004 increased fess to £3000 for those starting in 2006-7, so a decade ago they were £3000.

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    My friends didn't pay in 2002/3


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    Yes, with the same conditions that apply now. But the loans should cover everything. Most people have to get part time work to cover what the loans don't, which I disagree with.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    If automation becomes that good we'll all be like:

    It will but the question is how long, it kind of puts some of the narratives on here to shame too


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    (Original post by paul514)
    My friends didn't pay in 2002/3


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    Reading?

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