Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

30+ graduates with a career change - how to handle future applications? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm way off being in a position to apply for jobs but..

    Like a lot of people I'm looking for a career change. I'm 29 but will be 35 when I graduate in a degree that is completely different to what I've done for the past 12 years.

    When it comes to completing my CV after I graduate, it will mention my poor/average school qualifications, my old career with a patchy work history, a 2 year gap of unemployment due to depression, followed by a 3 or 4 year period of study for a degree in a completely different type of work to what I've previously done.

    Understandably, if I apply for a graduate type job in a field relating to my degree, a recruiter is going to look at my CV and probably laugh, 35, with no experience at all, with a new degree and a patchy CV.

    So how should I handle it when applying for jobs?
    If you graduated, how did you find employers/recruiters dealt with you and your CV that had a complete career change/patchy work history?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    if you think you lack work experience an idea might be to study whilst you get a job here and there, as for your age, employers aren't allowed to judge you based on age as it is against the Equality Act 2010 Some may even have blind CV's in which your age, race name etc aren't disclosed and even if they do, you have your reasons which any employer worth working for will understand
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SirAlexFerguson)
    if you think you lack work experience an idea might be to study whilst you get a job here and there, as for your age, employers aren't allowed to judge you based on age as it is against the Equality Act 2010 Some may even have blind CV's in which your age, race name etc aren't disclosed and even if they do, you have your reasons which any employer worth working for will understand
    I definitely don't lack work experience, I just have a patchy work history of various different jobs (10 different types of entry level role).

    I meant more as a 30+ graduate who will graduate with a degree in a field completely different to anything they have ever done, how will employers view me? Clearly a 21 year old graduate won't have much work experience due to studying since leaving school, but considering I'll have 12+ years of a CV with the odd retail, warehouse, bar job and nothing to do with my degree, will that be viewed negatively?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by YouSmartYouLoyal)
    I definitely don't lack work experience, I just have a patchy work history of various different jobs (10 different types of entry level role).

    I meant more as a 30+ graduate who will graduate with a degree in a field completely different to anything they have ever done, how will employers view me? Clearly a 21 year old graduate won't have much work experience due to studying since leaving school, but considering I'll have 12+ years of a CV with the odd retail, warehouse, bar job and nothing to do with my degree, will that be viewed negatively?
    If you can demonstrate the positives of your past jobs- i.e. draw out examples that show you meet a job description then I doubt employers will mind as much. Even better if you can get some experience that is more relevant to the area you wish to have a career in. Obviously you would need to explain any gaps but if you can put a positive spin on it that helps e.g. I was ill but I sought treatment and now I'm managing better. I don't see why your school grades need to go on your CV any more so long after you finished school.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    • Emphasize skills gained relative to the new field. Make your diverse experiences seem like an advantage, not a liability.
    • Gain new skills. Your problem is, partly, a self-esteem problem. "If you need self-esteem, do esteemable acts" is a quote that changed my life. If I want to feel good about my life, I have to do things worth feeling god about. It's as simple as that. Maybe you want to learn a language, teach yourself to code, set yourself the goal of a First and reach it...whatever...set a goal and achieve it.
    • Get new, relevant, impressive work experience. Get superlative references.
    • Leave your birthday off your CV.
    • Your GCSEs and A - Levels are irrelevant at this point
    • Find out how to telll your story in a way that is concise, confident, and communicates confidence. Don't be afraid to play the game. Find some sort of narrative arc - if you get creative/look hard enough you'll find/invent one. Don't lie, but it's okay not to share every detail. Employers are not your friends or family. They don't need to know about the depression etc.
    • Research how other people have dealt with this.
    • Write and rewrite your cover letter/rehearse and re-rehearse your 'personal branding'/'narrative arc' until it is free of shame, apologies, and excuses. This is the hardest part.............. I'm in a similar position as you and believe me...forgiving yourself, having confidence in yourself, and selling yourself can be hard when you've been through a lot and let yourself down in the past. Build self esteem by pouring positivity into your life everyday, even if you don't believe it. It will rub off on you.
    • Read The Growth Mindset by Carol Dweck. It will rub off on you
    • Community Assistant
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by YouSmartYouLoyal)
    ..........
    A CV is not a full chronology of your life (unless you are working in education, of for GCHQ) it is a selection of those parts that are relevant for the job you are applying for. So you title the Experience section of your CV - Relevant Experience and tadaa!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Break up or unrequited love?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.