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Reading Uni introduces flexible offers Watch

  • View Poll Results: Would you be influenced by unis giving flexible offers (so you can miss by a grade)?
    More likely to apply to them
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    No difference
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    It really depends on how they are flexible. If they often let people in with lower A-level/STEP grades then that would decrease the standard of the students so I'd have been less likely to apply to them, but if they aren't so strict with GCSEs then it's a positive.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I don't understand... why not just make the offer one grade lower since that would have the exact same effect and the offer would still actually be meaningful then?
    Because they want to be open about accepting 2-3 grades below their standard offer but they're worried that just making those offers up front will have applicants declining offers altogether (because applicants equate "high offer" with "high quality ") or getting a bunch of insurance applicants (and insurance applicants are a massive pain in the arse for planning/forecasting intake - too many variables and volatility and a whole bunch of work).

    No university wants to risk losing firms ir increasing insurances - so there's all this bull **** manipulative offer making behaviour to try to convince applicants to pick a university they would otherwise decline. Because for some reason universities seem so short termist and foolish that "tricking " applicants into making poor decisions is a better conversion tactic than attracting applicants on the actual merits of their provision.
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    In other words this is desperation.

    They're more concerned about their short term financial bottom line than attracting students to their courses on their own merits. And are willing to risk bad publicity and higher drop out rates to get a small increase in income over a short time period.

    I would advise any applicant to be extremely wary of any university that values their own short term finances above the decision making ability and happiness of their students/applicants.
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    Reading already lower your offer by a grade if you make them your firm choice... Cmon
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    (Original post by James A)
    Yeah but Reading normally let people in who missed out on their grades on results day.

    All they've done here is publicise it
    Indeed - it's just marketing...
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    (Original post by SecretDuck)
    More flexibility is always a good thing.

    I think that my uni offers restricted me too much with certain subjects requiring to have certain grades.

    Kent University gave me the most restricted offer of all time.
    Most restricted offer of all time?

    What offer did Kent University give you out of interest?
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    It'd put me off applying to them. Just makes them look desperate, I don't want to be in a class full of dunces.
    Well you're a barrel of laughs aren't you...
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Because they want to be open about accepting 2-3 grades below their standard offer but they're worried that just making those offers up front will have applicants declining offers altogether (because applicants equate "high offer" with "high quality " or getting a bunch of insurance applicants (and insurance applicants are a massive pain in the arse for planning/forecasting intake - too many variables and volatility and a whole bunch of work).

    No university wants to risk losing firms ir increasing insurances - so there's all this bull **** manipulative offer making behaviour to try to convince applicants to pick a university they would otherwise decline. Because for some reason universities seem so short termist and foolish that "tricking " applicants into making poor decisions is a better conversion tactic than attracting applicants on the actual merits of their provision.
    SOAS give offers of 37(666) in the IB (pretty damn high in my opinion) but will let you in if you miss your offer by a point. I wouldn't call that "bull **** manipulative offer making" - I'd say that's recognition that people have bad days.
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    No difference, I knew what Unis I wanted to go to before I applied. The offer itself wasn't going to sway me.
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    SOAS give offers of 37(666) in the IB (pretty damn high in my opinion) but will let you in if you miss your offer by a point. I wouldn't call that "bull **** manipulative offer making" - I'd say that's recognition that people have bad days.
    Agreed, they are simply recognising that people have bad days (especially taking into account how hard A-levels are nowdays).


    Without being biased as I attend Reading :lol:
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    (Original post by James A)
    Agreed, they are simply recognising that people have bad days (especially taking into account how hard A-levels are nowdays).


    Without being biased as I attend Reading :lol:
    Lol, it's a lovely place.

    But yeah I think people are seeing problems where there aren't any. Whilst I do think there is an issue of teachers over-predicting students, I don't see why universities shouldn't be flexible within a grade or so. Heck, most Unis will already consider taking students who've just missed their offer - after all there's a reason they gave out the offer in the first place.
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    SOAS give offers of 37(666) in the IB (pretty damn high in my opinion) but will let you in if you miss your offer by a point. I wouldn't call that "bull **** manipulative offer making" - I'd say that's recognition that people have bad days.
    If they'll accept 36 then offering 37 is bull **** designed to convince applicants to pick them as firm.

    If they recognise that applicants have bad days then why not make a 36/665 offer up front.

    All of these "reassurances " and statements of flexibility have zero legal status. The only conditions that obligate a university to accept you are the official offer conditions.
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    Lol, it's a lovely place.

    But yeah I think people are getting are seeing problems where there aren't any. Whilst I do think there is an issue of teachers over-predicting students, I don't see why universities shouldn't be flexible within a grade or so. Heck, most Unis will already consider taking students who've just missed their offer - after all there's a reason they gave out the offer in the first place.
    Exactly! Unis drop their requirements on results day to compensate for people not meeting their requirements and hence those people get accepted automatically.

    Reading has a very high number of applications per year, 10 times the national average or something (last year) so there is no desperation on their part.

    The open days here really sell the uni well.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    If they'll accept 36 then offering 37 is bull **** designed to convince applicants to pick them as firm.

    If they recognise that applicants have bad days then why not make a 36/665 offer up front.

    All of these "reassurances " and statements of flexibility have zero legal status. The only conditions that obligate a university to accept you are the official offer conditions.
    On the one hand its about the kind of applicants you attract in the first place, not just the ones you give offers to. Its also about making sure students don't become complacent and underachieve.

    As a strategy to 'get picked' its not actually that great for them. I'm forced to not put them down at all (even though I'd like to go) because they're not my first choice and the offer is higher than I'd feel comfortable putting as insurance.

    The 'legal status' is hardly relevant.
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    (Original post by James A)
    Exactly! Unis drop their requirements on results day to compensate for people not meeting their requirements and hence those people get accepted automatically.

    Reading has a very high number of applications per year, 10 times the national average or something (last year) so there is no desperation on their part.

    The open days here really sell the uni well.
    Now that is an impressive statistic. :O
    I visited Reading ages ago - liked it, but they didn't offer my course.
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    Now that is an impressive statistic. :O
    I visited Reading ages ago - liked it, but they didn't offer my course.
    Nice, which course did you want to do?
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    On the one hand its about the kind of applicants you attract in the first place, not just the ones you give offers to. Its also about making sure students don't become complacent and underachieve.

    As a strategy to 'get picked' its not actually that great for them. I'm forced to not put them down at all (even though I'd like to go) because they're not my first choice and the offer is higher than I'd feel comfortable putting as insurance.

    The 'legal status' is hardly relevant.
    In other words the manipulation has worked on you. They've avoided being put as insurance and were one of the choices you considered as firm. A decline is preferable to an insurance choice from a university point of view - insurance numbers are volatile and unpredictable - too many insurance applicants and you risk a substantial over or undershoot in students with almost no time to put remedial measures in place.

    Similarly the legal status of "flexible " offers works in favour of the university - if they do overshoot they can reject or force a gap year on applicants who missed their offer conditions. Their firm applicants will struggle to meet the criteria for adjustment.

    This tactic is solely for the benefit of the university concerned. If a university was confident that they're offering courses and a study environment that will win applicants on their merits then they would make lower offers officially.
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    (Original post by James A)
    Nice, which course did you want to do?
    Anthropology (and related).
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    It's what they all already do anyway, to a greater or lesser extent. Like Reading said, they're just being honest about it. This isn't anything new at all.
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    Both my son and daughter looked at Reading as its near to us - but no bursary - (am a single parent so I can't help them financially as I have to keep a 3 bedroom house going on one salary) ) so a no go even if offered an unconditional.
 
 
 
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