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Reading Uni introduces flexible offers Watch

  • View Poll Results: Would you be influenced by unis giving flexible offers (so you can miss by a grade)?
    More likely to apply to them
    699
    63.78%
    No difference
    305
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    Less likely to apply to them
    92
    8.39%

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    (Original post by PQ)
    In other words the manipulation has worked on you. They've avoided being put as insurance and were one of the choices you considered as firm. A decline is preferable to an insurance choice from a university point of view - insurance numbers are volatile and unpredictable - too many insurance applicants and you risk a substantial over or undershoot in students with almost no time to put remedial measures in place.

    Similarly the legal status of "flexible " offers works in favour of the university - if they do overshoot they can reject or force a gap year on applicants who missed their offer conditions. Their firm applicants will struggle to meet the criteria for adjustment.

    This tactic is solely for the benefit of the university concerned. If a university was confident that they're offering courses and a study environment that will win applicants on their merits then they would make lower offers officially.
    Not really... I wasn't going to put them as firm because of a 1 point difference in the offer. They were 4th in my 5 choices. And my choices weren't based on how high or low the offer would be. A Uni with lower offers was my 3rd preference.

    It's rather rude of you to say I've been 'manipulated'.

    It is ridiculous that students would go to Unis they less desire to go to because they are harder to get into.
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    (Original post by bioeng98)
    Most restricted offer of all time?

    What offer did Kent University give you out of interest?
    AB in Economics and Maths in any order, and B in French.

    They completely missed out Russian and English Language. So much for spreading the risk...
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    (Original post by James A)

    Reading has a very high number of applications per year, 10 times the national average or something (last year) so there is no desperation on their part.
    I would be interested in seeing those figures.



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    Why not just make their offers one grade lower?
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    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    I would be interested in seeing those figures.



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    7:1
    http://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/reading


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    But not '10 times the national average', as claimed.
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    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    But not '10 times the national average', as claimed.
    Apologies, I misquoted from here:

    http://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/ne..._on_last_year/

    The point about the high number of applications still stands, however.
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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    Well you're a barrel of laughs aren't you...
    (Original post by James A)
    Agreed, they are simply recognising that people have bad days (especially taking into account how hard A-levels are nowdays).


    Without being biased as I attend Reading :lol:
    I'm still not clear what exactly is meant by "miss their target by one A-level grade" - it sounds like they're prepared to accept people who drop a grade in all three A levels, not just one, as some of you seem to be suggesting. To me this just looks like a way of lowering the bar whilst trying to retain their image of a selective university.
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    (Original post by James A)
    Apologies, I misquoted from here:

    http://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/ne..._on_last_year/

    The point about the high number of applications still stands, however.
    True, though much of the reason for the big jump in 2015 was that it came in comparison with 2014, when there was a big fall. The ratios for applications to acceptances in 2015 was 7.3:1, in 2014 it was 6.4:1, in both 2013 and 2012 it was 7.6:1.

    https://www.ucas.com/sites/default/f...dr4_001_02.pdf
    https://www.ucas.com/sites/default/f...dr4_001_03.pdf
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    (Original post by ageshallnot)
    True, though much of the reason for the big jump in 2015 was that it came in comparison with 2014, when there was a big fall. The ratios for applications to acceptances in 2015 was 7.3:1, in 2014 it was 6.4:1, in both 2013 and 2012 it was 7.6:1.

    https://www.ucas.com/sites/default/f...dr4_001_02.pdf
    https://www.ucas.com/sites/default/f...dr4_001_03.pdf
    PRSOM

    I've been googling for that data for about 30 minutes...

    So here's a chart showing overall Applicants per Place
    (All UCAS universities, etc):
    Name:  Screen Shot 2016-02-14 at 16.39.37.jpg
Views: 68
Size:  62.7 KB


    And, just for fun, I've now done a quick analysis of all UCAS "providers" (universities or colleges listed by UCAS) to rank them by their Applicant : Acceptances ratio.
    If we limit ourselves to those with >1,000 acceptances and using 2015 data only:

    #1 LSE 10.67
    #2 Edinburgh 10.16
    #3 London South Bank 10.09
    #4 City Uni London 10.06
    #5 St Andrews 10
    #6 Brunel 9.82
    #7 Surrey 9.36
    #8 QMUL 9.20
    #9 London Met 9.07
    #10 Keele 8.77

    Selected others
    #40 Reading 7.30
    #51 Imperial 6.94
    #54 Durham 6.82
    #77 Oxford 5.89
    #104 Cambridge 4.83

    ... so it's not exactly a useful measure anyway....

    A more useful measure is Applicant : Offers (not Places)
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    (Original post by jneill)
    PRSOM

    I've been googling for that data for about 30 minutes...

    So here's a chart showing overall Applicants per Place
    (All UCAS universities, etc):
    Name:  Screen Shot 2016-02-14 at 16.39.37.jpg
Views: 68
Size:  62.7 KB


    And, just for fun, I've now done a quick analysis of all UCAS "providers" (universities or colleges listed by UCAS) to rank them by their Applicant : Acceptances ratio.
    If we limit ourselves to those with >1,000 acceptances and using 2015 data only:

    #1 LSE 10.67
    #2 Edinburgh 10.16
    #3 London South Bank 10.09
    #4 City Uni London 10.06
    #5 St Andrews 10
    #6 Brunel 9.82
    #7 Surrey 9.36
    #8 QMUL 9.20
    #9 London Met 9.07
    #10 Keele 8.77

    Selected others
    #40 Reading 7.30
    #51 Imperial 6.94
    #54 Durham 6.82
    #77 Oxford 5.89
    #104 Cambridge 4.83

    ... so it's not exactly a useful measure anyway....

    A more useful measure is Applicant : Offers (not Places)
    And unfortunately UCAS don't give offers numbers away for free. The % of applicants receiving an offer is available by course if Which? - they buy the data then publish it as a percent. But then they don't publish offers:accepts. Or the overall percentage for a university: http://university.which.co.uk/university-of-reading-r12
    http://university.which.co.uk/search...__desc&button=
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    8/207 courses where an applicant has a less than 50:50 chance of an offer.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    8/207 courses where an applicant has a less than 50:50 chance of an offer.
    Excluding Oxbridge surely?
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Excluding Oxbridge surely?
    oh that's just looking at Reading's courses.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    oh that's just looking at Reading's courses.
    Ha - ok! LOL.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I'm still not clear what exactly is meant by "miss their target by one A-level grade" - it sounds like they're prepared to accept people who drop a grade in all three A levels, not just one, as some of you seem to be suggesting. To me this just looks like a way of lowering the bar whilst trying to retain their image of a selective university.
    I'm thinking of one grade in one A-level. AAA to BBB is ridiculous without extenuating circumstances.


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    (Original post by SecretDuck)
    AB in Economics and Maths in any order, and B in French.

    They completely missed out Russian and English Language. So much for spreading the risk...
    5 A levels? I suppose they might want the three most relevant subjects for the course you are applying for, which is what a fair few universities seem to ask for as well. If it wasn't for the excluding of Russian and English Language, that seems to be a rather regular offer. :/
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    It's pretty standard for universities to let people in who miss the grade. Within reason it's better than participating in clearing. I know medical students and law students at UCL who dropped a grade and still got in.

    Making it a formal part of an offer is a bit odd though. If they say in an offer you can get AAA-ABB, unless they can then make a decision about your suitability after the fact if you get ABB, the AAA is just a waste of time sticking on the paper. The real offer is ABB and always was.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Because for some reason universities seem so short termist and foolish that "tricking " applicants into making poor decisions is a better conversion tactic than attracting applicants on the actual merits of their provision.
    There is very little actual information on the merits of university provision. Universities play these tricks because applicants are buying blind.

    What information does an applicant really get about the quality of a university?

    1 A series of league tables subject to manipulation which are missing key data like quality of teaching and using inaccurate statistical proxies for other relevant information.

    2 A impressionistic view of the university on an open day where the university parades its most stimulating lecturers and committed students. Probably the only fairly representative features are (a) the quality of maintenance from the facilities management department and (b) the ability of the university admin to organise a convivial occasion in a beer factory.

    3 A 25 year old impressionistic view of teachers and parents.

    There is nothing equivalent to a hotel or restaurant review guide which actually gives an opinion regarding a university and its courses rather than merely regurgitating data provided by the university.

    If you ask which university has the best module on 19th century romantic poetry and which university has the best tennis courts, you won't find anything to help.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    There is nothing equivalent to a hotel or restaurant review guide which actually gives an opinion regarding a university and its courses rather than merely regurgitating data provided by the university.
    Opportunity for TSR to create a TripAdvisor for universities... (not that TA is flawless of course).


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