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    Hi,

    I posted a similar question but realized it is more applicable here, so moderators feel free to delete the other one (I couldn't figure out how). Anyways, I would love some info on how good these programs are as I live in the USA but would like to study medicine in the uk.

    1. Imperial
    2. St. George's, University of London (specifically their international medicine program)
    3. UCL
    4. Queen Mary, University of London

    Any info would be much appreciated!
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    (Original post by lpapadakis)
    Hi,

    I posted a similar question but realized it is more applicable here, so moderators feel free to delete the other one (I couldn't figure out how). Anyways, I would love some info on how good these programs are as I live in the USA but would like to study medicine in the uk.

    1. Imperial
    2. St. George's, University of London (specifically their international medicine program)
    3. UCL
    4. Queen Mary, University of London

    Any info would be much appreciated!
    You can find the information on their websites

    Imperial I know is heavily science based, but thats all I know!
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    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by lpapadakis)
    Hi,

    I posted a similar question but realized it is more applicable here, so moderators feel free to delete the other one (I couldn't figure out how). Anyways, I would love some info on how good these programs are as I live in the USA but would like to study medicine in the uk.

    1. Imperial
    2. St. George's, University of London (specifically their international medicine program)
    3. UCL
    4. Queen Mary, University of London

    Any info would be much appreciated!
    Given the current climate for junior doctors in the UK, how much it would cost you to study here and how difficult it would be to go home afterwards, I would seriously recommend doing your medical degree in the US.
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    (Original post by lpapadakis)
    Hi,

    I posted a similar question but realized it is more applicable here, so moderators feel free to delete the other one (I couldn't figure out how). Anyways, I would love some info on how good these programs are as I live in the USA but would like to study medicine in the uk.

    1. Imperial
    2. St. George's, University of London (specifically their international medicine program)
    3. UCL
    4. Queen Mary, University of London

    Any info would be much appreciated!
    I agree with what Forestcat said above i think you would be better off going to an american med school but thats just my opinion
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    (Original post by lpapadakis)
    Hi,

    I posted a similar question but realized it is more applicable here, so moderators feel free to delete the other one (I couldn't figure out how). Anyways, I would love some info on how good these programs are as I live in the USA but would like to study medicine in the uk.

    1. Imperial
    2. St. George's, University of London (specifically their international medicine program)
    3. UCL
    4. Queen Mary, University of London

    Any info would be much appreciated!
    Agreeing with the previous two posters, I think you'd be better off doing the normal US med route.
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    All four are well respected medical schools. I would start with their websites and then ask here if anything isn't clear.

    What is your motivation for studying in the UK and where do you intend to work on graduation? As others have said, the UK is not a happy place for doctors at the moment. If your plan is to get a medical degree without going to college first (i.e. a 5 year UK medical degree instead of 8 years college + MD) then you will need to think about this very carefully. Medical school is expensive for overseas students (QMUL says £30,500 or $44,200 per year) and you presumably wouldn't be entitled to federal student loans. You would also be living in London, which is not a cheap city by any means.

    If you plan to practice in the US, you would have to study for the USMLE alongside your UK medical degree. The material will overlap but your medical school will not be actively preparing you for the USMLEs. You will also be treated as an International Medical Graduate when you come to apply for US residencies. This is a much weaker position to apply from (some residency programs don't even accept IMG applications) and will make it harder to secure your choice of residency position.

    The advantages of studying in the UK are that training would be shorter (5 versus 8 years) and there is less competition in terms of applications-per-place than in the US.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    All four are well respected medical schools. I would start with their websites and then ask here if anything isn't clear.

    What is your motivation for studying in the UK and where do you intend to work on graduation? As others have said, the UK is not a happy place for doctors at the moment. If your plan is to get a medical degree without going to college first (i.e. a 5 year UK medical degree instead of 8 years college + MD) then you will need to think about this very carefully. Medical school is expensive for overseas students (QMUL says £30,500 or $44,200 per year) and you presumably wouldn't be entitled to federal student loans. You would also be living in London, which is not a cheap city by any means.

    If you plan to practice in the US, you would have to study for the USMLE alongside your UK medical degree. The material will overlap but your medical school will not be actively preparing you for the USMLEs. You will also be treated as an International Medical Graduate when you come to apply for US residencies. This is a much weaker position to apply from (some residency programs don't even accept IMG applications) and will make it harder to secure your choice of residency position.

    The advantages of studying in the UK are that training would be shorter (5 versus 8 years) and there is less competition in terms of applications-per-place than in the US.
    Hi,

    Yes I'm fully aware that bring an IMG is a downside when applying for residency, however St. George's has an IMG 6 yr course that does prepare you for the USMLEs, would you know anything about that? They have scholarships for IMGs there which is a plus, and considering how high tuition is in the USA for the schools I'm looking at (mostly Ivy Leagues), it is actually cheaper there, flights included. I also want a school where I can focus solely on medicine. I don't enjoy the humanities as much but ever US college leans towards the "we want well rounded students when they graduate" kind of curriculum. I also have many connections through MGH, Harvard Med, and Boston Childrens which I could use to line up away rotations in the US.
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    Okay, fair enough. I wasn't aware of St George's IMG course until now. I have previously worked at St George's and it is a well-organised medical school that is physically situated in St George's Hospital (a large 1000+ bed Major Trauma Centre in South London). It is a little odd to have the medical school library, lecture theatres, seminar rooms, and social facilities (student bar, etc) actually in the hospital but it does create a strong connection between students and patients from the very beginning. Are you able to visit before making a six year commitment?

    If you can rely on contacts in the US than I'm sure the IMG issues are surmountable, particularly as you won't face any of the usual IMG visa issues.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    Okay, fair enough. I wasn't aware of St George's IMG course until now. I have previously worked at St George's and it is a well-organised medical school that is physically situated in St George's Hospital (a large 1000+ bed Major Trauma Centre in South London). It is a little odd to have the medical school library, lecture theatres, seminar rooms, and social facilities (student bar, etc) actually in the hospital but it does create a strong connection between students and patients from the very beginning. Are you able to visit before making a six year commitment?

    If you can rely on contacts in the US than I'm sure the IMG issues are surmountable, particularly as you won't face any of the usual IMG visa issues.
    Hi. Thanks for the useful knowledge.
    So, even if you did not have visa issues (i.e. you held a US passport), would you still face IMG problems? I read somewhere that nationality has become an obstacle for residency, but not sure exactly what happens.
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    (Original post by Captain Ahab)
    So, even if you did not have visa issues (i.e. you held a US passport), would you still face IMG problems?
    This is worth checking (particularly if you have contacts in Boston) as I don't have direct experience of this myself. I was however in the US all of last year (Harvard Medical School) and met lots of people running the IMG gauntlet...

    My understanding is that you are categorised as an IMG based on where you went to medical school, not your citizenship, and so I'd take some time to understand the implications of your decision. As well as trying to contact residency directors, you could ask on USMLE fora as some of the people there become frighteningly well informed about IMG issues: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/foru...and-comlex.189 and http://www.usmle-forums.com. You could also ask Skeptical Scalpel (http://skepticalscalpel.blogspot.co.uk) who sometimes posts queries like this from applicants and often prompts a range of perspectives (including from residency program directors).

    I suspect you would be more employable than other IMGs (you will have the right accent, US experience, and wouldn't need visa sponsorship) but I do think that you would be considered in the pool of IMGs and separately to US graduates. Unless you made alternative arrangements (e.g. negotiated exceptions with individual residency directors), this might include being ineligible to apply to programs that don't accept IMGs. This could make it harder to match.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    This is worth checking (particularly if you have contacts in Boston) as I don't have direct experience of this myself. I was however in the US all of last year (Harvard Medical School) and met lots of people running the IMG gauntlet...

    My understanding is that you are categorised as an IMG based on where you went to medical school, not your citizenship, and so I'd take some time to understand the implications of your decision. As well as trying to contact residency directors, you could ask on USMLE fora as some of the people there become frighteningly well informed about IMG issues: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/foru...and-comlex.189 and http://www.usmle-forums.com. You could also ask Skeptical Scalpel (http://skepticalscalpel.blogspot.co.uk) who sometimes posts queries like this from applicants and often prompts a range of perspectives (including from residency program directors).

    I suspect you would be more employable than other IMGs (you will have the right accent, US experience, and wouldn't need visa sponsorship) but I do think that you would be considered in the pool of IMGs and separately to US graduates. Unless you made alternative arrangements (e.g. negotiated exceptions with individual residency directors), this might include being ineligible to apply to programs that don't accept IMGs. This could make it harder to match.
    Hmmm. I see.
    Thanks for the valuable information!
 
 
 
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