Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Dear Medicine students, what is it like???? watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Right, so attending open days is a bit difficult since I live in another country.

    So what is it like being a med student? Stress, workload, what do you do? Just asking in general, as I want a students point of view/experience on it.

    Thank you:yy:
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    There is quite a big workload. And it requires one to have a very good memory but provided you stay on top of it all, it is not as stressful as most make it out to be.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by s.v)
    There is quite a big workload. And it requires one to have a very good memory but provided you stay on top of it all, it is not as stressful as most make it out to be.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thanks for the reply!

    So how would you say it compares with A levels? (Or whatever you did in the final 2 years). And are there projects that require teamwork and things like that?
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    Thanks for the reply!

    So how would you say it compares with A levels? (Or whatever you did in the final 2 years). And are there projects that require teamwork and things like that?
    Quite a big step up from A-Levels, there's loads of breath with a reasonable depth. Generally the content is not overly challenging, it is the volume of work that is difficult. That's perhaps an oversimplification, because some stuff is challenging, but generally it's the volume that distinguishes it from A-Levels.

    Specifics about projects etc vary massively between medical schools, but generally there will be projects you need to complete and generally some of them will have a teamwork component.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beska)
    Quite a big step up from A-Levels, there's loads of breath with a reasonable depth. Generally the content is not overly challenging, it is the volume of work that is difficult. That's perhaps an oversimplification, because some stuff is challenging, but generally it's the volume that distinguishes it from A-Levels.

    Specifics about projects etc vary massively between medical schools, but generally there will be projects you need to complete and generally some of them will have a teamwork component.
    Thanks for the reply

    Another thing, to what extent (if at all) do you have to keep up to date with medical issues (clinical or not) to keep up with the course?
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    Thanks for the reply

    Another thing, to what extent (if at all) do you have to keep up to date with medical issues (clinical or not) to keep up with the course?
    Most pre-clinical stuff won't really change dramatically, so there isn't such an importance in the pre-clinical years to keep up to date with advances in basic or medical science and any significant changes will likely be communicated to you. In the clinical years (and for the rest of the career) it is very important to keep up to date with advances in clinical medicine, as they do advance quickly. You'll be getting information from up to date clinical guidelines, etc. rather than relying on textbooks.

    For example, I got Kumar and Clarke in first year, published 2009, and I'd say a large chunk of the investigation/management in there would be out of date now. The basic medical science would generally be OK, as I say, but some notable things off the top of my head that are just plainly incorrect include the thought that type 2 diabetes is caused by peripheral insulin resistance as a driving factor. Advances since 2009 (or likely 2007/2008 when the book was actually written) change that way of thinking. Things like the management of stroke are very soon going to be altered completely with findings that thrombectomy is significantly+++ better than thrombolysis and things like textbooks can't keep up to date with things like that.

    Pre-clinical years, no need to keep up (generally). Clinical years, use guidance (NICE/SIGN/BTS/ECS/etc) and review papers to keep on top of stuff rather than textbooks. Uptodate is amazing as well.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beska)
    Most pre-clinical stuff won't really change dramatically, so there isn't such an importance in the pre-clinical years to keep up to date with advances in basic or medical science and any significant changes will likely be communicated to you. In the clinical years (and for the rest of the career) it is very important to keep up to date with advances in clinical medicine, as they do advance quickly. You'll be getting information from up to date clinical guidelines, etc. rather than relying on textbooks.

    For example, I got Kumar and Clarke in first year, published 2009, and I'd say a large chunk of the investigation/management in there would be out of date now. The basic medical science would generally be OK, as I say, but some notable things off the top of my head that are just plainly incorrect include the thought that type 2 diabetes is caused by peripheral insulin resistance as a driving factor. Advances since 2009 (or likely 2007/2008 when the book was actually written) change that way of thinking. Things like the management of stroke are very soon going to be altered completely with findings that thrombectomy is significantly+++ better than thrombolysis and things like textbooks can't keep up to date with things like that.

    Pre-clinical years, no need to keep up (generally). Clinical years, use guidance (NICE/SIGN/BTS/ECS/etc) and review papers to keep on top of stuff rather than textbooks. Uptodate is amazing as well.
    Wow, thanks for the detail! Much appreciated. :yy:

    (What's NICE/BTS/ECS/SIGN though? )
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by PharaohFromSpace)
    Wow, thanks for the detail! Much appreciated. :yy:

    (What's NICE/BTS/ECS/SIGN though? )
    Different types of guidance, which is based on evidence (i.e. tells you what you need to do for a particular condition without you having to assimilate the literature yourself). They stand for:

    NICE - http://www.nice.org.uk/
    SIGN - http://www.sign.ac.uk/guidelines/index.html (Scottish equivalent of NICE, but covers some things NICE doesn't)
    ESC - European Society of Cardiology, for heart related stuff - https://www.escardio.org/Guidelines-...s-list/listing
    BTS - British Thoracic Society, mainly asthma/COPD guidelines plus other lung stuff - https://www.brit-thoracic.org.uk/gui...ity-standards/
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beska)
    Different types of guidance, which is based on evidence (i.e. tells you what you need to do for a particular condition without you having to assimilate the literature yourself). They stand for:

    NICE - http://www.nice.org.uk/
    SIGN - http://www.sign.ac.uk/guidelines/index.html (Scottish equivalent of NICE, but covers some things NICE doesn't)
    ESC - European Society of Cardiology, for heart related stuff - https://www.escardio.org/Guidelines-...s-list/listing
    BTS - British Thoracic Society, mainly asthma/COPD guidelines plus other lung stuff - https://www.brit-thoracic.org.uk/gui...ity-standards/
    Super helpful and PRSOM.

    Plus I'm running out of ways to say thank you
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: February 13, 2016
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.