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Those who have unsuccessfully been job searching for 'too long' since graduating Watch

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    Hi, this is just a thread out of curiosity, for those of you who believe you have been looking for a job for an excessive amount of time, especially the ones with no real or relevant work experience who are probably finding it harder. When i say 'too long', i mean it in a very subjective way, dont take that offensively, to some people a month is too long, to some it can be a whole year before they panic, the questions that i wanted to ask you are:

    - how 'desperate' in your job search are you? how many jobs do you apply for roughly a week? Ive heard some people say that its better to concentrate your efforts on a 'few' applications, but ive also heard some people saying they would rather fire out at least 20-30 CV's a week - again, this is probably down to how much you want to work

    - would you take a placement in a job that you are 'qualified' (Capable of doing) to do but in an industry you have absolutely no interest in?

    - what would you consider good pay? are you at a point where you would basically take anything offered to you? or would you still reject a good 'opportunity' because of low compensation

    - would you ever consider going back into education?

    - Would you still have done a degree if you could have seen where you would be X amount of time after graduating and job searching?
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    (Original post by KungPooPanda)
    Hi, this is just a thread out of curiosity, for those of you who believe you have been looking for a job for an excessive amount of time, especially the ones with no real or relevant work experience who are probably finding it harder. When i say 'too long', i mean it in a very subjective way, dont take that offensively, to some people a month is too long, to some it can be a whole year before they panic, the questions that i wanted to ask you are:

    - how 'desperate' in your job search are you? how many jobs do you apply for roughly a week? Ive heard some people say that its better to concentrate your efforts on a 'few' applications, but ive also heard some people saying they would rather fire out at least 20-30 CV's a week - again, this is probably down to how much you want to work

    - would you take a placement in a job that you are 'qualified' (Capable of doing) to do but in an industry you have absolutely no interest in?

    - what would you consider good pay? are you at a point where you would basically take anything offered to you? or would you still reject a good 'opportunity' because of low compensation

    - would you ever consider going back into education?

    - Would you still have done a degree if you could have seen where you would be X amount of time after graduating and job searching?
    I've been looking to secure my first graduate role since August. I do have relevant experience, however I've been struggling with interviews.

    1) I am getting a bit desperate now. However having said that, I've still put quality over quantity. A few well targeted carefully thought out applications are better than lots of generalised ones. Remember its not just about firing out CV's, you have to write a cover letter or answer questions too.

    2) I'd happily take any job I'm capable of- so I'd consider a temp admin role for example, however I've found even many of these want someone with an admin background. I also wouldn't have a clue how to write a cover letter for an admin role as I obviously couldn't say how I was really keen on it and working for the company when I just saw it as a filler.

    3) I'd take any pay tbh, the area I really want a job in you basically have to do at least one sometimes more poorly paid (or even not paid) internships to have a crack at a permanent role.

    4) I actually did a Masters because most people in my chosen industry have one and it gave me another summer holiday to obtain more work experience. However at the end of the day no amount of education can compensate if you cant write a decent application or perform well at interview.

    5) Yes I definitley would have done a degree, otherwise I wouldn't even have a chance in my chosen area.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    I've been looking to secure my first graduate role since August. I do have relevant experience, however I've been struggling with interviews.

    1) I am getting a bit desperate now. However having said that, I've still put quality over quantity. A few well targeted carefully thought out applications are better than lots of generalised ones. Remember its not just about firing out CV's, you have to write a cover letter or answer questions too.

    2) I'd happily take any job I'm capable of- so I'd consider a temp admin role for example, however I've found even many of these want someone with an admin background. I also wouldn't have a clue how to write a cover letter for an admin role as I obviously couldn't say how I was really keen on it and working for the company when I just saw it as a filler.

    3) I'd take any pay tbh, the area I really want a job in you basically have to do at least one sometimes more poorly paid (or even not paid) internships to have a crack at a permanent role.

    4) I actually did a Masters because most people in my chosen industry have one and it gave me another summer holiday to obtain more work experience. However at the end of the day no amount of education can compensate if you cant write a decent application or perform well at interview.

    5) Yes I definitley would have done a degree, otherwise I wouldn't even have a chance in my chosen area.
    what area of work are you in? by the sounds of it, it sounds like you do something like law, medicine? something that basically 'requires' a degree?

    when you said youve been searching for a 'graduate' role, does that mean your generally only targeting roles that are aimed at graduates?

    struggling with interviews, you mean to get call backs for interview's atall, or youve been having them and need to brush up on your interviewing skills/method

    i currently have about 6 different written out cover letter templates on my computer for different types of roles, when you say you couldnt say how excited you are to work an admin role, why not? if your (not you personally, but people in general) really want the job, whats the problem with making it seem as though your super duper keen to work for them, the company im about to start for is under the impression that i couldnt be happier to be starting work there, in reality, ive been searching for a job harder than ever in the HOPE that in between now and when i start i will find something in my chosen area of work, the people there are very very nice and everything, and i NEEDED a job, needed to get on that ladder, but if i had the choice, id take 25% less pay and even less favourable commuting circumstances if it meant i could have a job that has a relevent title to what i want. At the moment im stuggling to understand how someone whos been a Quality Assurance Analyst for 1/2 years will get into finance.
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    (Original post by KungPooPanda)
    what area of work are you in? by the sounds of it, it sounds like you do something like law, medicine? something that basically 'requires' a degree?

    when you said youve been searching for a 'graduate' role, does that mean your generally only targeting roles that are aimed at graduates?

    struggling with interviews, you mean to get call backs for interview's atall, or youve been having them and need to brush up on your interviewing skills/method

    i currently have about 6 different written out cover letter templates on my computer for different types of roles, when you say you couldnt say how excited you are to work an admin role, why not? if your (not you personally, but people in general) really want the job, whats the problem with making it seem as though your super duper keen to work for them, the company im about to start for is under the impression that i couldnt be happier to be starting work there, in reality, ive been searching for a job harder than ever in the HOPE that in between now and when i start i will find something in my chosen area of work, the people there are very very nice and everything, and i NEEDED a job, needed to get on that ladder, but if i had the choice, id take 25% less pay and even less favourable commuting circumstances if it meant i could have a job that has a relevent title to what i want. At the moment im stuggling to understand how someone whos been a Quality Assurance Analyst for 1/2 years will get into finance.
    No, my ideal area is a policy researcher. And I've had a few, first couple I just didn't know how to answer the questions. One was for a more events/fundraising based role as I thought oh I'll just go for it as its something I can do, however the person interviewing me was like 'why do you want to move into fundraising/events when your background is in Policy making, and then looked very unimpressed when I gave a reason, like she was never going to believe me. Since then I've had a couple more and basically been told that the jobs went to people who displayed more enthuasism for the role, and these were in areas that I was enthusastic about! I was just too busy trying to convey what I had to offer them to think about gushing over their work. I do feel however now I understand how to get the balance between the two.

    And because I couldn't put it into words. When I started my cover letters for the policy roles I usually say 'I'm interested in this area because I studied x y z at uni and I follow the latest policy making in the news' and how I support the organisations work and why, which as its usually political/policy based flows nicely.

    However with admin jobs, I'd have no idea what I'd make up to claim I really wanted it.
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    Personally i think people often have themselves to blame for graduate unemployment. For most courses there's no reason you could not have had a part time job and often people move back home to a place in the middle of nowhere.

    I had a pending job offer in a call center but declined and then spent 4 months searching for a decent job. In hindsight i'd have taken the call center job or better yet gone to agencies for factory work. I'm now in retail but rather happy given the promotional opportunities being with a multinational.

    Moral of the story is to take the first job you get.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Personally i think people often have themselves to blame for graduate unemployment. For most courses there's no reason you could not have had a part time job and often people move back home to a place in the middle of nowhere.

    I had a pending job offer in a call center but declined and then spent 4 months searching for a decent job. In hindsight i'd have taken the call center job or better yet gone to agencies for factory work. I'm now in retail but rather happy given the promotional opportunities being with a multinational.

    Moral of the story is to take the first job you get.
    I wouldn't say take the first job you are offered as some graduate programs require a two year commitment or you will be faced with hefty debt to reclaim the training costs if you leave before that period. So if you hate the job or are offered something better then you're pretty much stuck in a hard place and can't leave.

    That's certainly the reason I declined the one offer I did get but at this point (almost a year since graduating) i'm just going to stick it out and take anything as you could end up waiting forever i'm already being questioned about the gap on my cv.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Personally i think people often have themselves to blame for graduate unemployment. For most courses there's no reason you could not have had a part time job and often people move back home to a place in the middle of nowhere.

    I had a pending job offer in a call center but declined and then spent 4 months searching for a decent job. In hindsight i'd have taken the call center job or better yet gone to agencies for factory work. I'm now in retail but rather happy given the promotional opportunities being with a multinational.

    Moral of the story is to take the first job you get.
    To an extent I agree. People complain about not being able to get a graduate job and just blame competition, when, and I speak from experience, there is always something they can do to improve. However just getting a part time retail job at uni isn't always the answer, I've seen people on here complain they ended up just carrying on with their part time job post uni. The whole picture needs to be looked at- the applications, interviews e.c.t
 
 
 
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