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    Id say common, although my parents are posh :rolleyes:
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    I used to be posh but then the cook got cholera and we had to send her away...without a cook you cant really call yourself posh
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    (Original post by Ghost)
    Id say common, although my parents are posh :rolleyes:
    mine too, and then when we go out, they will try to put it on even more and embaress the hell outa me and my sis
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    I'm neither.
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    Neither! Such worldly matters rarely enter my consciousness.
    Bohemian perhaps.

    Is it me or are the smilies seriously f**ked up today!
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    Bit of both, which in itself is quite common.
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    (Original post by tammypotato)
    braskfast (morning)
    lunch(midday)
    tea time (4oclock)
    dinner(night)
    thats how i learnt it in yr 6 (when i was doing french in france!)
    And here's the French version of the lesson:

    Petit déjeuner (matin)
    Déjeuner (midi)
    Dîner (soir)
    Souper (plus ou moins la même chose et terme peu employé de nos jours)

    But in French Canada it gets all complicated

    Déjeuner (matin)
    Diner (midi)
    Souper (soir)

    That might explain why some people refer to Dinner as the lunch meal. It's changed over time...

    And in the USA, the main course is always called an "entree" whereas in France, an "entrée" is a starter. Really confusing...
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    I have a Scottish accent. It isn't a strong imposing ginger-bearded-guy-in-a-kilt type one, or one of those really annoying squeaky glasgow ones, but it's still there, so I couldn't possibly be posh! Oh, and technically I'm still English, just I moved here when I was 4, and unlike most of my country am supporting them in Europe.

    My school does sound posh though, "Grantown Grammar", but it wasn't, and isn't a grammar school any more. I was Dux this year, but I think that could be a Scottish thing.
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    (Original post by Cossack)
    funny you should say that i was playing croquet the other day, although we were using bits of stick for the hoops and a baseball bat and we just made up the rules as we went along....kind of a golf/croquet hybrid if you like....muchos upper class fun
    funny you should mention croquet...
    i actually play proper (association) croquet competitively in tournaments up and down the country, and am also a qualified coach, trying to get more younger people into the game.

    it's nice if you have fun making up the rules and playing 'garden croquet', but if you play it properly, it can be extremely rewarding - the proper game is a cross between snooker and chess, on a larger scale and played on grass. if you're into tactical games like snooker, then you might like croquet.
    visit http://www.croquet.org.uk for details.

    and it is definitely not a game for posh people to play in the garden on a sunday afternoon - that is just a stereotyped image, much like English people who don't wash etc. and it's not vicious.
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    It really depends. At home, in my local area, when in class at school and when in the company of people who are speaking in a measured and articulate way - my intution demands that I act in a 'posh' way. When I'm engaging in general banter with my friends, if I'm out at the pub or usually in large groups of people my age - then I have a different and altogether 'more common' persona.

    Being able to adapt to circumstance and to select an appropriate modus operandi, especially when in contact with different types of people, is a key social skill. I have a wide range of friends from various social backgrounds - I simply would not get on with certain people, if I addressed them like I would my parents.

    Isn't it curious how, depending on an accent and the background of a person - "the estate" can conjure up such polarised images? It could mean Highgrove or The Gorbals.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    It really depends. At home, in my local area, when in class at school and when in the company of people who are speaking in a measured and articulate way - my intution demands that I act in a 'posh' way. When I'm engaging in general banter with my friends, if I'm out at the pub or usually in large groups of people my age - then I have a different and altogether 'more common' persona.
    If you disregard what you can pretend to be, what actually are you?
 
 
 
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