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Government will prosecute students who don't repay student loans Watch

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    (Original post by ron_trns)
    I was outside the country working for 2 years and they sent me 4 letters in the first 3 months, asking me to update my status and why I wasn't paying my student loan contributions. They will definitely chase you up, the ironic thing was I had £500 left on my loan, that's all. My original loan was tiny in the first place (barely 4 figures). So I just paid it off there and then.

    There is nothing they could have done to me outside the country but as soon as I hit borders if they had known I'd been earning outside the country they could have easily had a case against me and I imagine for people owing lots of money they'd pursue court action. I'm not surprised they are toughening up on it at all and quite rightly so. The real problem is that current tuition fees are just too extortionate.

    If you take out a loan, you should realistically be expected to pay it back and the current thresholds are pretty generous as far as I'm concerned.
    It's not something I ever plan on doing myself, I was merely sharing an experience I'd heard from someone else.

    While I don't agree with having to leave with so much debt, I do agree that, as I've taken out a loan, I should pay it back. However - as you've stated, your debt barely made four figures whereas now, the average student will leave with £50k+ worth of debt, so I don't think you have the right to judge on someone who chooses to.
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    (Original post by R.Coleman)
    Well a loan from a neighbour (assuming a contract isn't drawn up) is not the same as one from Wonga. Since you actually have to pay Wonga back, you don't have to pay back your neighbour.
    Morals dictate otherwise.
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    (Original post by Lacesso)
    Morals dictate otherwise.
    Well that would depend upon the person.
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    (Original post by R.Coleman)
    Well that would depend upon the person.
    Well, anyone that takes a loan from another person with no intention of paying it back belongs on the end of a rope, but yes you're right, it does.
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    (Original post by paul514)
    They can't alter the terms of loans already taken out simple.


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    Yes they can. They shouldn't, but they can.

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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    To anybody who has a problem with this? Does this mean you will also shut up about Google and the likes avoiding their taxes? Or those with big money? How about you go take out s loan from a high Street bank and avoid payment according to the terms and see if they will just let you walk away with the money?

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    And yet you had none of these problems with Googles tax affairs, so by your logic you yourself are a hypocrite.

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    And what a coincidence, emerging right after the junior doctors plan to move to Australia/Canada

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    (Original post by Pegasus2)
    People are told, over and over throughout school and college

    "Go to university and get a good job"
    "You need to go to university to get a good job"
    "You'll only get a good job if you go to university"

    etc etc etc

    They are told over and over again at every step at college by teachers, because it makes their ranking stats look better and encouraged by the previous government to go to University and get a degree. They then form this oppinion that they'll be nobody and their life ruined unless they go to uni.

    They then get out of uni with whatever less useful degree they have, lots of debt only to find that they've basically been lied to.

    So you can't really blame them for going.
    Yeah, I totally agree with this, schools go out of their way to pressure students to go to uni, you cant blame the students for picking a poor degree when teachers tell them it'll still make them employable.

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    tbh

    degrees other than engineering, medic, dentistry, sciences, teaching, law and maybe languages, e.g degrees other than practical skills that require professional training shouldn't exist

    scrap the degree requirement for civil service and just have an entry test

    rest of the country should be doing crafts or employed doing what they would end up doing with a bad degree anyway

    inb4 i like studying philosophy, so do i, go to the library douchebag
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    (Original post by Lacesso)
    A loan is a loan. Doesn't matter if it's from your neighbour, Wonga or for university; you should expect to have to pay it back eventually.
    But the conditions upon receiving the loan when we all agreed to attend university was that repayment commences upon earning a certain income level. They can't go back against their conditions now.

    I doubt it's that they'll force people to repay below the income threshold, it's probably aimed at those who dishonestly try to avoid repayment.
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    What's so wrong about this? A loan is not your money, it's not yours to keep and it must be repaid to the actual owner- whether your parents, the bank or the state. If you can't repay it, don't take the loan in the first place.
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    (Original post by whorace)
    tbh

    degrees other than engineering, medic, dentistry, sciences, teaching, law and maybe languages, e.g degrees other than practical skills that require professional training shouldn't exist

    scrap the degree requirement for civil service and just have an entry test

    rest of the country should be doing crafts or employed doing what they would end up doing with a bad degree anyway

    inb4 i like studying philosophy, so do i, go to the library douchebag
    What will happen to philosophy as an academic discipline then if it is no longer taught at a university?You philistine. I'm not one for philosophy, but I appreciate it as a discipline, the same for other arts subjects. If it is not taught at university level, then there will be no schools for those subjects, so there will no longer be professors and other academics in those disciplines. So philosophy will be history. So you won't be able to get any new books from the library, well done m8, top logic.

    I'm also curious as to why you think a languages degree is worthy, if not a philosophy degree?
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    I'm afraid they just did. The T&Cs of current students stated that the repayment threshold would increase in line with inflation, meaning that repayment amounts would remain relatively static. Last year, the government announced that the £21,000 threshold would be fixed for five years, This means that as wages begin to rise in line with the economic recovery, a larger proportion of students will find themselves over the threshold, and more students will make larger repayments.

    Whilst this might seem trivial, as you say, it's effectively a breach of contract. I think it's the government dipping their toe in the water to see how people react. If it doesn't look like they'll lose votes, my guess is that they'll start making more significant changes. Watch out for them starting to demonise students in the near future - if they can persuade the voting public that students are a bunch of layabout scroungers, there may even be votes to be won by making even harsher changes.

    Martin Lewis is seeking a judicial review of the change, to determine whether it is actually even legal to impose it in retrospect:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/p...ent-loans.html
    Then a legal challenge can overturn that either by Martin Lewis or a regular individual.


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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    What will happen to philosophy as an academic discipline then if it is no longer taught at a university?You philistine. I'm not one for philosophy, but I appreciate it as a discipline, the same for other arts subjects. If it is not taught at university level, then there will be no schools for those subjects, so there will no longer be professors and other academics in those disciplines. So philosophy will be history. So you won't be able to get any new books from the library, well done m8, top logic.

    I'm also curious as to why you think a languages degree is worthy, if not a philosophy degree?
    Who cares about philosophy as an academic discipline? It hasn't had any relevance beyond pseudo nonsense for centuries, even the analytic philosophers themselves have made this admission many times, just pick up a book by Wittgenstein, one of the most admired philosophers in the 20th century who says it is basically a load of nonsense.

    I sincerely hope you understand that most advancements in the arts are not made by university professors, Dickens, Tolstoy, Proust, Orwell. Are you noticing a pattern?
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    (Original post by whorace)
    Who cares about philosophy as an academic discipline? It hasn't had any relevance beyond pseudo nonsense for centuries, even the analytic philosophers themselves have made this admission many times, just pick up a book by Wittgenstein, one of the most admired philosophers in the 20th century who says it is basically a load of nonsense.

    I sincerely hope you understand that most advancements in the arts are not made by university professors, Dickens, Tolstoy, Proust, Orwell. Are you noticing a pattern?
    You're so ignorant...
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    (Original post by simon_g)
    ignorance of some people never cease to surprise me
    Studying at University isn't, by any means, mandatory. you took the loan, now you expect everybody else to pay for it. And yeah- having to pay the loans means that people will at least chose the important studies, not some BS.
    Yeah you really sound like such a bright spark yourself. Mama and papa wasted their money son.
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    You're so ignorant...
    I've changed my mind, we could do with a whole team of academics to teach you elementary logic.

    What exactly do you object to? The fact I have pointed out that Ludwig Wittgenstein, one of the most respected philosophers in the tradition no longer considers it relevant? The fact I have pointed out that most writers and artists are not university professors and many don't even receive a university education?
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    (Original post by Rock Fan)
    What you all make of this with the government punishing any student who fails to repay their student loan on time?
    http://www.independent.co.uk/student...-a6869221.html
    Students all signed contracts that they would pay a certain amount if they earn over the threshold (relative to their wages), so any student who tries to break the conditions of the contract should be punished. This is excellent news, especially as some students were planning to cheat the system
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    I'm afraid they just did. The T&Cs of current students stated that the repayment threshold would increase in line with inflation, meaning that repayment amounts would remain relatively static. Last year, the government announced that the £21,000 threshold would be fixed for five years, This means that as wages begin to rise in line with the economic recovery, a larger proportion of students will find themselves over the threshold, and more students will make larger repayments.

    Whilst this might seem trivial, as you say, it's effectively a breach of contract. I think it's the government dipping their toe in the water to see how people react. If it doesn't look like they'll lose votes, my guess is that they'll start making more significant changes. Watch out for them starting to demonise students in the near future - if they can persuade the voting public that students are a bunch of layabout scroungers, there may even be votes to be won by making even harsher changes.

    Martin Lewis is seeking a judicial review of the change, to determine whether it is actually even legal to impose it in retrospect:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/p...ent-loans.html
    The quicker we phase out Micky mouse studies like art and force students not to take these degrees, the better things will be
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    I'm afraid they just did. The T&Cs of current students stated that the repayment threshold would increase in line with inflation, meaning that repayment amounts would remain relatively static. Last year, the government announced that the £21,000 threshold would be fixed for five years, This means that as wages begin to rise in line with the economic recovery, a larger proportion of students will find themselves over the threshold, and more students will make larger repayments.

    Whilst this might seem trivial, as you say, it's effectively a breach of contract. I think it's the government dipping their toe in the water to see how people react. If it doesn't look like they'll lose votes, my guess is that they'll start making more significant changes. Watch out for them starting to demonise students in the near future - if they can persuade the voting public that students are a bunch of layabout scroungers, there may even be votes to be won by making even harsher changes.

    Martin Lewis is seeking a judicial review of the change, to determine whether it is actually even legal to impose it in retrospect:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/p...ent-loans.html
    It's not far from the truth though really is it? Nowhere near as much work as an average full time job in most cases. Depends on degree of course.
 
 
 
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