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    Why doesn't the government change the UK benefits system so that you have to pay in before you can get any help. I know generation of families who have never worked. Obviously there has to be exceptions if you can't work because you have a disability then you should be able to claim.
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    You kind of already have to.

    There are two types of Job Seeker's Allowance (JSA).

    Income based and Contribution based.

    If you have worked before, you can claim Contribution based JSA if you have savings and capital under £16,000.

    If you have not worked before, you can claim income based for ONLY 12 months, IF you have savings and capital under £6,000 (Yes, not £16,000 as with Contribution based).

    If you are disabled, you claim ESA. This works kind of like JSA in that the income and savings rules apply. Most people who claim ESA are placed in the Work Related Activities Group (WRAG) and can claim ESA up to 12 months. This is for people who are found to have a limited capability for work after having a face to face medical assessment.

    However, those with more severe disabilities are placed in the support group, and can claim ESA indefinitely.

    Disabled people can also claim PIP, which is not as strict as ESA in that you can be in full time employment and claim it.

    Just a bit of knowledge off the top of my head

    The UK benefit system is actually quite strict when compared to the more socialist Scandinavian countries for example.
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    And what about people who are new to jobseeking, like graduates, those just turned 16, and so on? I am thankfully employed now but there was a period when I was first looking for work where I needed JSA to make ends meet.
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    (Original post by CreamyChocolate)
    You kind of already have to.

    There are two types of Job Seeker's Allowance (JSA).

    Income based and Contribution based.

    If you have worked before, you can claim Contribution based JSA if you have savings and capital under £16,000.

    If you have not worked before, you can claim income based for ONLY 12 months, IF you have savings and capital under £6,000 (Yes, not £16,000 as with Contribution based).

    If you are disabled, you claim ESA. This works kind of like JSA in that the income and savings rules apply. Most people who claim ESA are placed in the Work Related Activities Group (WRAG) and can claim ESA up to 12 months. This is for people who are found to have a limited capability for work after having a face to face medical assessment.

    However, those with more severe disabilities are placed in the support group, and can claim ESA indefinitely.

    Disabled people can also claim PIP, which is not as strict as ESA in that you can be in full time employment and claim it.

    Just a bit of knowledge off the top of my head

    The UK benefit system is actually quite strict when compared to the more socialist Scandinavian countries for example.
    So what's the difference between income-based and contribution based Jsa?
 
 
 
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