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Honestly, why do people even stress about getting a 2:1 in 2016? Watch

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    I mean, everyone graduates with a 2:1 anyway and still spends months unemployed, living with parents, before getting a job in Asda?

    I'm in my final year of Engineering where the difference in the amount of work I'd need to put in to ensure getting a 2:1 is huge compared to a 2:2. I kind of just think, why bother? If I'm going to be unemployed anyway it seems like I may as well just not stress, chill and get a 2:2? They both seem the same to me in terms of uselessness.
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    Most graduate jobs require a 2:1 so if you do get a 2:1 then at least you have a chance whilst if you get a 2:2 you basically have to get an entry-level job.
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    Don't be so negative, you should do your best whatever happens, engineering graduates are valued in many industries.

    And yes, a 2.1 is the minimum requirement for the majority of jobs and MScs and PhDs in further education.
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    chill and get a 2:2 then. heck why even bother with a 2:2, get a 2:3
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    A 2:1 at least allows you to apply for graduate jobs, a 2:2 wouldn't even give you a chance. Why reduce the number of opportunities?
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    (Original post by ♥Samantha♥)
    Most graduate jobs require a 2:1 so if you do get a 2:1 then at least you have a chance whilst if you get a 2:2 you basically have to get an entry-level job.
    Yeah but only something like 15-20% of graduates get grad-level jobs.

    For the amount of extra work needed to get a 2:1 over a 2:2, it almost doesn't seem worth it especially when you can end up with 59.9%.
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    Having anything lower than a 2.1 can significantly hinder what jobs/programs you are eligible to apply for. You've already said it having a 2.1 isn't the key holder anymore as were in an age where even "entry level" jobs aren't entry level anymore. Not having a 2.1 widens the struggle even more.
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    (Original post by Lord Samosa)
    A 2:1 at least allows you to apply for graduate jobs, a 2:2 wouldn't even give you a chance. Why reduce the number of opportunities?
    It just doesn't seem worth the effort for such a small window of opportunity. Most people don't get grad-level jobs even with a 2:1.
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    (Original post by chrt28)
    Don't be so negative, you should do your best whatever happens, engineering graduates are valued in many industries.

    And yes, a 2.1 is the minimum requirement for the majority of jobs and MScs and PhDs in further education.
    It's not negative it's just being realistic. It is well known in the modern that most people who get 2:1's don't get graduate level jobs.
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    (Original post by chosenone93)
    Having anything lower than a 2.1 can significantly hinder what jobs/programs you are eligible to apply for. You've already said it having a 2.1 isn't the key holder anymore as were in an age where even "entry level" jobs aren't entry level anymore. Not having a 2.1 widens the struggle even more.
    Yeah but that's my point.

    A 2:1 is basically nothing anyway so you may as well just not bother, put in less work and get a 2:2.

    The whole idea of working your nuts off to get a 2:1 so you can be one of the 4 people in the country who gets a graduate level job just seems ludicrous.
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    (Original post by TutuBEng)
    Yeah but only something like 15-20% of graduates get grad-level jobs.

    For the amount of extra work needed to get a 2:1 over a 2:2, it almost doesn't seem worth it especially when you can end up with 59.9%.
    Sorry I did not mean to rep this comment. Surely it is worth it TO YOU to put in the extra work on your degree, in order to widen your prospects. If your attitude now is that it's not worth it, then yes you will be unemployed for some time.
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    If you don't mind spending all that tuition fees and having your end goal set to achieving a Desmond then uni probably isn't for you.

    My friend graduated with a Desmond and she hasn't found a job in 2 years. Why make life harder for yourself? Getting a 2:1 won't guarantee you getting a job but it's the minimum requirement for most jobs, so ideally you would want to aim for that
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    (Original post by TutuBEng)
    It's not negative it's just being realistic. It is well known in the modern that most people who get 2:1's don't get graduate level jobs.
    I am a Physics graduate with a 2.1 and got pretty much the first job I applied for out of uni (a geophysicist job paying 28k).

    I was recently contacted by a recruiter designing optical fibres who were seeking an engineering/physics graduate, and they invited me for an interview but I declined... there are still jobs out there!

    My recommendation is that if you really feel you wont get a job then do an MSc in some specialist area in electrical engineering/computer science/finance or whatever your interest is in. There are now grad loans to do an MSc.
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    (Original post by CCC75)
    Sorry I did not mean to rep this comment. Surely it is worth it TO YOU to put in the extra work on your degree, in order to widen your prospects. If your attitude now is that it's not worth it, then yes you will be unemployed for some time.
    It's like investing a huge amount of money for an incredibly small chance that you might make a few extra bucks on top.

    There's nothing wrong my attitude, I'm pointing out a realistic observation of the graduate employment market.

    If their was like a 50% chance than a 2:1 gave someone a graduate job, it would be worth the chance. But such a tiny chance seems moronic.
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    (Original post by UWS)
    If you don't mind spending all that tuition fees and having your end goal set to achieving a Desmond then uni probably isn't for you.

    My friend graduated with a Desmond and she hasn't found a job in 2 years. Why make life harder for yourself? Getting a 2:1 won't guarantee you getting a job but it's the minimum requirement for most jobs, so ideally you would want to aim for that
    Yeah but thousands of other graduates get 2:1's and are unemployed for years as well.

    All I'm saying it we're basically at a point where a 2:1 is essentially as useless as a 2:2.

    The chances of getting a grad job with a 2:1 are so low nowadays that you're probably just as likely to get one with a 2:2.
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    (Original post by TutuBEng)
    It's like investing a huge amount of money for an incredibly small chance that you might make a few extra bucks on top.

    There's nothing wrong my attitude, I'm pointing out a realistic observation of the graduate employment market.

    If their was like a 50% chance than a 2:1 gave someone a graduate job, it would be worth the chance. But such a tiny chance seems moronic.
    To me your reasoning is off. If a 2:1 degree provides such a tiny chance of successful employment, then you should be aiming for a 1st or not have embarked on the academic journey at all.

    Have you considered that a lower degree may not gain you entry to employment at graduate level but may well earn a speedier promotion through the ranks by merit of possessing a degree at all?
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    (Original post by TSRFT8)
    Where have you gathered that "everyone" falls in the same boat. Also many degrees are very picky in only recruiting from certain universities (RG) people on here love to tell you different. A 2:1 from a RG is better than a 2:1 from say Wolverhampton. I dont really see your point, i mean why did you actually bother going to university then?
    From seeing and reading about a load of RG Graduates with 2:1's and 1sts who don't get graduate-level jobs.

    A 2:1 from Wolverhampton is more eligible to apply for grad jobs than someone like myself who could end up with a 2:2 in Engineering from an RG.

    Obviously I aimed to do a good degree and a top Uni and get a 2:1, I've just become disillusioned over the years with how worthwhile it all been after seeing where people have gone after graduation.
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    The idea that you can't get a job with a 2.1 engineering degree is ludicrous. There are many degrees like History, Psychology etc. where that would be the case but engineering can lead to many possibilities.

    A more valid question would be is it worth the extra effort to get a first? In many cases I would say no.
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    (Original post by CCC75)
    To me your reasoning is off. If a 2:1 degree provides such a tiny chance of successful employment, then you should be aiming for a 1st or not have embarked on the academic journey at all.

    Have you considered that a lower degree may not gain you entry to employment at graduate level but may well earn a speedier promotion through the ranks by merit of possessing a degree at all?
    With all due respect, would I be correct in saying that you either haven't been to University or are somewhere around the 1st year?

    A 2:1 and 1st are essentially the same thing in terms of graduate job prospects.

    No one gives a crap about your degree classification after you've gotten your first job. It all becomes about experience.
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    (Original post by chrt28)
    A more valid question would be is it worth the extra effort to get a first? In many cases I would say no.
    Interesting, why?
 
 
 
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