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    Hi guys

    I am currently working on an essay on the doctrine of separation of powers in the uk.
    I first defined what is meant by separation of powers and the history of it (Artistotle, Locke and Montesquieu...).
    Then I stated the several breaches, first between executive/legislative, then legislative/judiciary and judiciary/executive, highlighting the checks and balances and so on...

    How can I conclude?
    I was thinking about stating the different views between judges and academics and then say that even if the 2005 made some reforms, it did not really change the relation between the legislative and executive as there are still some important overlaps.
    What do you think?
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    (Original post by Aletheia1995)
    Hi guys

    I am currently working on an essay on the doctrine of separation of powers in the uk.
    I first defined what is meant by separation of powers and the history of it (Artistotle, Locke and Montesquieu...).
    Then I stated the several breaches, first between executive/legislative, then legislative/judiciary and judiciary/executive, highlighting the checks and balances and so on...

    How can I conclude?
    I was thinking about stating the different views between judges and academics and then say that even if the 2005 made some reforms, it did not really change the relation between the legislative and executive as there are still some important overlaps.
    What do you think?
    We would need to see your essay, but don't post it here. Why have you gone all the way to Aristotle to talk about the separation of powers? Isn't it simply to do with Politics v Law (IE: Development of the Rule of Law); the Executive; the Judiciary etc? Don't go further back than your textbooks - I presume you've been given Loveland or somesuch.

    Your conclusion should be solid, not options, and should not be a surprise. It should reflect your opening paragraph and line of argument throughout.

    Any essay on SoP I would follow the line that it is a wholly good thing, and mention how the Rule of Law is necessary to uphold accountability. You know, the usual that would have made Dyson rather happy.
 
 
 
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