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    With the changing times of greater access to higher education- is an affordance for us all?

    I suppose you could argue that it is in that sense, however, pragmatically, beyond university it is always the middle-classes that will have access to a greater wealth of connections and more likely do better as a result.

    Meaning, access is far more equal (although to the folly of the working classes- as they are less likely to get a high paid job / pay it off), however, once in the system it is always those of affluent backgrounds that tend to flourish as a result of nepotism or the unfair power dynamic.

    I always think, particularly within the elite circles of university management that, they are really there to serve their own. The middle or upper echelons of society- so whenever they deliver their flowery keynote speech at graduation about how "graduates should seize the moment- if you work hard you play hard- strive to achieve and you will"- it is only ever taken realistically if you fit a particular socioeconomic bracket. If you are working class, sometimes (but not in all cases) the amount of effort you put in doesn't project or correlate with how wealthy you become- your still going to be relatively worse off. If your middle class, you already have a ready-made recipe for success, hence this advice is more realistic from this view.

    I just read a dated article in The Guardian, and the writer talks about the struggle of graduates in todays world, and how we are too picky to take cafe jobs- and back in her day they were like gold-dust. That we should revel in it, and not take such jobs for granted. Woe is me attitude and what not. She fails to indicate that actually, the reason she was afforded the opportunity to piss about in her education and still live relatively 'care-free'- picking up the slack later in life, was because she had a lovely trust fund from Daddy (not stated of course).

    She was privileged but claimed to empathise with today's jobless or unfortunate graduate. When she is bloody middle-class, privately educated, and could piss away her formative years- earning a few bob as pocket-money in Tesco's, and then sanctimoniously preach to others. These sorts of people irk me.

    What do you all think?
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    I disagree for the most part, the people I know who are most successful nowadays tend to be from working class backgrounds as they're more appreciative of the investment into them and so make better use of it. The only situation I can think of which is somewhat correlated to class where they have an advantage that's not solved with a little bit of effort is if they live in an area where skilled jobs are readily available.
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    (Original post by royal1990)
    With the changing times of greater access to higher education- is an affordance for us all?

    I suppose you could argue that it is in that sense, however, pragmatically, beyond university it is always the middle-classes that will have access to a greater wealth of connections and more likely do better as a result.

    Meaning, access is far more equal (although to the folly of the working classes- as they are less likely to get a high paid job / pay it off), however, once in the system it is always those of affluent backgrounds that tend to flourish as a result of nepotism or the unfair power dynamic.

    I always think, particularly within the elite circles of university management that, they are really there to serve their own. The middle or upper echelons of society- so whenever they deliver their flowery keynote speech at graduation about how "graduates should seize the moment- if you work hard you play hard- strive to achieve and you will"- it is only ever taken realistically if you fit a particular socioeconomic bracket. If you are working class, sometimes (but not in all cases) the amount of effort you put in doesn't project or correlate with how wealthy you become- your still going to be relatively worse off. If your middle class, you already have a ready-made recipe for success, hence this advice is more realistic from this view.

    I just read a dated article in The Guardian, and the writer talks about the struggle of graduates in todays world, and how we are too picky to take cafe jobs- and back in her day they were like gold-dust. That we should revel in it, and not take such jobs for granted. Woe is me attitude and what not. She fails to indicate that actually, the reason she was afforded the opportunity to piss about in her education and still live relatively 'care-free'- picking up the slack later in life, was because she had a lovely trust fund from Daddy (not stated of course).

    She was privileged but claimed to empathise with today's jobless or unfortunate graduate. When she is bloody middle-class, privately educated, and could piss away her formative years- earning a few bob as pocket-money in Tesco's, and then sanctimoniously preach to others. These sorts of people irk me.

    What do you all think?
    I'm from lower middle class family and none went to university while I'm the first one. I can say that middle class doesn't 100% mean wealth and contacts.
 
 
 
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