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how many water melons? Watch

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    This pic is doing the rounds.

    Name:  Melons.jpg
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    If the answer isn't 5, please explain.
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    6 I think.

    I think the smaller pieces are halves not quarters
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    There are 4.

    In the corners there are 4 3/4 melons. Then there are 4 1/4 melons rotated through 90 degrees.

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    Uh they are 1/2 melons. The answer is 5

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    Minimum number is 6 (assuming the middle ones are a pair of watermelons cut in half). You can't cut a fraction out of a watermelon, attach it to another water melon and call it a complete water melon. It's still two watermelons.
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    Minimum number is 6 (assuming the middle ones are a pair of watermelons cut in half). You can't cut a fraction out of a watermelon, attach it to another water melon and call it a complete water melon. It's still two watermelons.
    Let me know who you end up working for
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    5!

    (And no not 5 factorial)
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    "Melons.jpg" what a let down :-(
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    5 or 6 lol
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    Min 6, Max 8
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    (Original post by NJA)
    Let me know who you end up working for
    Fruit and veg shop. I learnt on my internship that customers don't like having bits of fruit superglued together.

    The answer 5 can only be obtained if you regard them as abstract fractions.
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    0.

    The term 'watermelon' refers to the entire thing. A slice of a watermelon is not a whole watermelon: it is just a slice. It's like having an apple slice and calling it a whole apple. If someone walked into a shop and asked for an apple and you gave them apple slices that form a full apple they wouldn't be happy.

    Alternatively if we add the fractions of each like others have been doing then we get just under 6. This is because in the time it took for the fruit to be cut, placed, and imaged, water would have evaporated from the cut regions, causing mass loss and hence the watermelons aren't as complete as they first appear. This is a real world problem and not one that can be viewed purely mathematically. There are four watermelons that have a quarter missing, and two that are cut in half.
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    (Original post by Quantex)
    Fruit and veg shop. I learnt on my internship that customers don't like having bits of fruit superglued together.

    The answer 5 can only be obtained if you regard them as abstract fractions.
    but the customers might be prepared to buy 1/4 watermelon slices... in which case there's 5 watermelons worth in the picture.

    you need to start with minimum of 6 melons to make that sculpture (or whatever it is) unless you're using photoshop or other shenannigans though.
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    The question asks for "water melons". Whereas the picture is of watermelons.

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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    6 I think.

    I think the smaller pieces are halves not quarters
    Yep they are halves so two of them will fill the four missing quarters giving:
    4 whole + 2 halves = . . . . 5



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