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    I am currently in year 12 and having a bit of a 'decision' as to what course I should be taking at university. I've considered medicine, but I'm not 100% that I want to do the course.

    I'm taking biology, chemistry, maths and further maths. I will be dropping further maths at As level and doing the other 3 at a level.

    My questions is, what courses am I open to? What university courses will allow me to open up into a good job? Which uni courses are a waste of time etc. I will be thankful for any help I can get from you guys 😊
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    (Original post by LukeReynoldson)
    I am currently in year 12 and having a bit of a 'decision' as to what course I should be taking at university. I've considered medicine, but I'm not 100% that I want to do the course.

    I'm taking biology, chemistry, maths and further maths. I will be dropping further maths at As level and doing the other 3 at a level.

    My questions is, what courses am I open to? What university courses will allow me to open up into a good job? Which uni courses are a waste of time etc. I will be thankful for any help I can get from you guys 😊
    Do you prefer a Maths-heavy course? Or Biology? A mix of Chemistry/Bio or just Chemistry? Do you want to learn about decisions/how money circulates? Do you see yourself as a Doctor?

    All of these are questions you should as yourself. Don't think about 'good job' think about which kind of fields you'd be looking at - any reasonable degree can get you a good job, but some can get you a job you'd prefer doing.

    Maths-y courses:
    Maths (plus any combos: Maths+Physics, Maths+Computer Science, Data Science, Maths+Stats, MORSE)
    Computer Science
    Engineering (lack of Physics may be an issue)

    Science:
    Biology (+ the subsets of it: Biochemistry, Neuroscience, Biomedical Science etc)
    Chemistry
    Natural Sciences
    Medicine

    Social Science:
    Law (do bear in mind that you're not actually qualified to practice law with a law degree, you'll need a training contract/pupilage and non-law students can become lawyers)
    Economics
    Psychology




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    (Original post by LukeReynoldson)
    I am currently in year 12 and having a bit of a 'decision' as to what course I should be taking at university. I've considered medicine, but I'm not 100% that I want to do the course.

    I'm taking biology, chemistry, maths and further maths. I will be dropping further maths at As level and doing the other 3 at a level.

    My questions is, what courses am I open to? What university courses will allow me to open up into a good job? Which uni courses are a waste of time etc. I will be thankful for any help I can get from you guys 😊
    Medicine aside, getting a good job is not so much down to what uni course you did, but more what you can offer- in terms of work experience and soft skills. You need to consider which subjects you are currently taking that you enjoy and look through university website course profiles- they detail what kind of things you would study & what the entry requirements are, both subject and grade wise.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    Medicine aside, getting a good job is not so much down to what uni course you did, but more what you can offer- in terms of work experience and soft skills. You need to consider which subjects you are currently taking that you enjoy and look through university website course profiles- they detail what kind of things you would study & what the entry requirements are, both subject and grade wise.
    Totally agree, I think if OP is not certain as to the type of job he/she wants to go into, it is better to find a course that interests him, but keeping in mind whether the course would provide him with transferrable skills that are seen necessary by employers. Some courses will obviously teach more in-demand transferrable skills than others e.g. Law> fine arts.
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    Totally agree, I think if OP is not certain as to the type of job he/she wants to go into, it is better to find a course that interests him, but keeping in mind whether the course would provide him with transferrable skills that are seen necessary by employers. Some courses will obviously teach more in-demand transferrable skills than others e.g. Law> fine arts.
    There's nothing that inherently makes Law better than Fine Arts..

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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    Totally agree, I think if OP is not certain as to the type of job he/she wants to go into, it is better to find a course that interests him, but keeping in mind whether the course would provide him with transferrable skills that are seen necessary by employers. Some courses will obviously teach more in-demand transferrable skills than others e.g. Law> fine arts.
    In all honesty most employers don't rate the so called 'transferable skills' gained through university that highly, they place far more emphasis on work experience, soft skills, being able to write a decent cover letter or application and performance at assessment centre/interview if you get that far- these are things that a university course doesn't always help with. There are a glut of law grads, way more than there are pupilages/training contracts and the ones who get them are the ones who've got work experience and can present themselves well. You'd get laughed at if you just said 'my degree taught me transferable skills' without offering anything else.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    In all honesty most employers don't rate the so called 'transferable skills' gained through university that highly, they place far more emphasis on work experience, soft skills, being able to write a decent cover letter or application and performance at assessment centre/interview if you get that far- these are things that a university course doesn't always help with. There are a glut of law grads, way more than there are pupilages/training contracts and the ones who get them are the ones who've got work experience and can present themselves well. You'd get laughed at if you just said 'my degree taught me transferable skills' without offering anything else.
    It's because most degrees do not actually develop "transferable" skills. They are highly individual pursuits often built around theoretical knowledge rather than practical realities. Very few careers are like that.

    It's all the skills you can gather outside of your degree but while at uni that mean you have more "transferable skills" often the "soft-skills" you refer to.

    Attitudes towards work experience are changing though, particularly when many are trying to make their professions more accessible to a wider group of people.

    Work experience often is the assumption that it is "relevant" work experience in that field, but sometime part-time jobs and volunteer work are equally as good (as sometimes better) than some work shadowing in the profession they are recruiting for.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    It's because most degrees do not actually develop "transferable" skills. They are highly individual pursuits often built around theoretical knowledge rather than practical realities. Very few careers are like that.

    It's all the skills you can gather outside of your degree but while at uni that mean you have more "transferable skills" often the "soft-skills" you refer to.

    Attitudes towards work experience are changing though, particularly when many are trying to make their professions more accessible to a wider group of people.

    Work experience often is the assumption that it is "relevant" work experience in that field, but sometime part-time jobs and volunteer work are equally as good (as sometimes better) than some work shadowing in the profession they are recruiting for.
    Yeah hence why I put transferable skills in quotation marks. Completely agree with your post.
 
 
 
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