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No bursary for nursing and midwifery students from 1017 Watch

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    Since they are going to stop the bursary will tutition fees still be paid by NHS and do you have to take out a student loan?
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    (Original post by glamourprincess)
    Since they are going to stop the bursary will tutition fees still be paid by NHS and do you have to take out a student loan?
    It'll all be covered by a loan from Student Finance. Even if you've done a degree/previous HE study you'll still get the loan and maintenance support.
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    (Original post by glamourprincess)
    Since they are going to stop the bursary will tutition fees still be paid by NHS and do you have to take out a student loan?
    From what I've read and understand from 2017 you pay tuition fees like other students. Bursaries are no more and you take out a student loan to cover the fees and maintenance.
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    (Original post by glamourprincess)
    Since they are going to stop the bursary will tutition fees still be paid by NHS and do you have to take out a student loan?
    Under the new rules, you would need to apply for tuition fee loan and maintenance loan, unless you can self fund i.e. pay the £9000 tuition fee by yourself. But if you studying a course like nursing that has more than one intake a year you can STILL get the bursary if you apply and secure a place on course with a January, March or April intake as the new rules come into affect for all courses starting from the 1st of August, 2017.
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    (Original post by Fifstar)
    Under the new rules, you would need to apply for tuition fee loan and maintenance loan, unless you can self fund i.e. pay the £9000 tuition fee by yourself. But if you studying a course like nursing that has more than one intake a year you can STILL get the bursary if you apply and secure a place on course with a January, March or April intake as the new rules come into affect for all courses starting from the 1st of August, 2017.
    It's not really fair though cuz I won't be at uni til about 2018/19 I will have to pay 9 grand a year plus get a loan for food and rent that probably be about 40000 + why should student nurses have to pay when they barely earn 21 grand and has to pay membership fees and parking we won't be able to live especially when we have to pay back the loan it's absurd
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    (Original post by glamourprincess)
    It's not really fair though cuz I won't be at uni til about 2018/19 I will have to pay 9 grand a year plus get a loan for food and rent that probably be about 40000 + why should student nurses have to pay when they barely earn 21 grand and has to pay membership fees and parking we won't be able to live especially when we have to pay back the loan it's absurd
    Perfectly fair, as every other graduate has to do exactly that. But they don't have a (more or less) guaranteed job for life at the end with a half decent salary (comparing this to many entry level science jobs which pay 12-16,000 and expect a BSc minimum). Plus you can get a loan for a second degree which most graduates can't get. If you don't want to do it because of fee loans then nursing probably isn't for you, if it's all you've ever dreamt of doing and want to help people then it is still possible, it just means you're in the same position as every other graduate at the end.
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    (Original post by glamourprincess)
    It's not really fair though cuz I won't be at uni til about 2018/19 I will have to pay 9 grand a year plus get a loan for food and rent that probably be about 40000 + why should student nurses have to pay when they barely earn 21 grand and has to pay membership fees and parking we won't be able to live especially when we have to pay back the loan it's absurd
    Unfortunately, the government don't really care whether it is fair or not; because as it stands the NHS isn't sustainable and cutting costs on the front-line is harder and since it costs the health education Education £34,623 annually to train a student nurse, this doesn't include the money awarded by the bursary and other grants accessible to all student nurses that apply. And sadly due to the high drop out rate leading to huge losses, soaring numbers in applicants for the limited number of university places, it makes sense to cash in on this popularity of the course and stop the staffing crisis. The loans system will according to the government stop the nurse shortage as the cap in numbers of students will be removed, meaning that not will they have a larger number of qualified nurses at the end but they will also have saved a lot of money. I don't agree with this change at all, I mean what are they going to do about providing good quality placements; the cap exists as there is a shortage of mentors to support the students throughout the entirety of the course, so how in the hell are they going to fix this in a time span of 12 months??

    BTW I have applied for a January, 2017 entry, as I have already done my A Levels and I am currently in work and the year gives me time to save some money. But if I had to go in September it wouldn't bother me as I know that I want to be a nurse and the debt will be worth it in order to embark on a career that I believe is my calling.
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    (Original post by SuperCat007)
    Perfectly fair, as every other graduate has to do exactly that. But they don't have a (more or less) guaranteed job for life at the end with a half decent salary (comparing this to many entry level science jobs which pay 12-16,000 and expect a BSc minimum). Plus you can get a loan for a second degree which most graduates can't get. If you don't want to do it because of fee loans then nursing probably isn't for you, if it's all you've ever dreamt of doing and want to help people then it is still possible, it just means you're in the same position as every other graduate at the end.
    Not every other student has to wrack up 2600 practice hours over the three years ie working for the NHS!
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    (Original post by lilibet01)
    Not every other student has to wrack up 2600 practice hours over the three years ie working for the NHS!
    This could be a good thing though, not immediately I admit but since students are actually paying then the quality of placements has to improve surely; my cousin was used as a HCA and felt that she wasn't getting the most out of placements unless she had a stand off with her mentor. If students are paying for the course then, they'll be more inclined to voice their displeasure with being treated as a skivvie on placement and improve on their clinical and personal development throughout the course.
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    (Original post by Fifstar)
    This could be a good thing though, not immediately I admit but since students are actually paying then the quality of placements has to improve surely; my cousin was used as a HCA and felt that she wasn't getting the most out of placements unless she had a stand off with her mentor. If students are paying for the course then, they'll be more inclined to voice their displeasure with being treated as a skivvie on placement and improve on their clinical and personal development throughout the course.

    I've always had good placements bar one, what a shame for your cousin. What will be an issue is trying to shoe horn a lot more students into placements when there is already a problem trying to accommodate the current number of students
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    It surprises me that people think it's 'perfectly fair'. You have to work on placement 50%, often full time hours and shift work, in addition to studying. There's no spare time to take a part time job and the course hours are usually a lot longer than other degrees to take into account that you are actually working - far shorter holidays. In effect not only are you working for free, but actually paying to work. How anyone can compare that to other undergraduate degrees is beyond me. Also the average age of healthcare students is around 29, i.e people who will not take extra debt, meaning that a lot of people who would've applied will not do so. I also doubt very much that paying for the course will have anything to do with the 'quality' of placement, surely you get out what you put in. I can't really believe that students now find this acceptable..? The staff shortages, due to underfunded training and this new loan system are directly related to the privatisation of the NHS.
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    The govt will just import a lot of nurses from other coiuntries if there are not enough British nurses so they are not bothered if there are fewer nurses being trained.
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    If students were not on full time placements (not just learning but contributing/working) I wouldn't see it as so unfair but half of the 3 years is spent almost as a nurse assistant, supernumerary but still students do a lot for the NHS. The NHS should at least pay the tuition fees.
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    (Original post by indigofox)
    If students were not on full time placements (not just learning but contributing/working) I wouldn't see it as so unfair but half of the 3 years is spent almost as a nurse assistant, supernumerary but still students do a lot for the NHS. The NHS should at least pay the tuition fees.
    I agree
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    I'm going to university in September and I was going to study child nursing, but than I changed my mind and applied for childhood studies instead just in case I decide that nursing wasn't for me. I applied for childhood studies, because I thought after this degree if I still decided I wanted to be a children's nurse I can study this degree, and as soon as it was NHS funded I wouldn't need to worry about securing another loan (I didn't know it was stopping until just now). Does anyone know if I was to study nursing as a second degree, would I be able to get a second loan easily? Or would it be like other degrees and really difficult to get a loan to study another degree?
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    (Original post by iioii)
    It surprises me that people think it's 'perfectly fair'. You have to work on placement 50%, often full time hours and shift work, in addition to studying. There's no spare time to take a part time job and the course hours are usually a lot longer than other degrees to take into account that you are actually working - far shorter holidays. In effect not only are you working for free, but actually paying to work. How anyone can compare that to other undergraduate degrees is beyond me. Also the average age of healthcare students is around 29, i.e people who will not take extra debt, meaning that a lot of people who would've applied will not do so. I also doubt very much that paying for the course will have anything to do with the 'quality' of placement, surely you get out what you put in. I can't really believe that students now find this acceptable..? The staff shortages, due to underfunded training and this new loan system are directly related to the privatisation of the NHS.
    From I heard we had to pay it nearly put me off studying nursing might as well get entry level job with no debt
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    (Original post by Jordannnlouisee)
    I'm going to university in September and I was going to study child nursing, but than I changed my mind and applied for childhood studies instead just in case I decide that nursing wasn't for me. I applied for childhood studies, because I thought after this degree if I still decided I wanted to be a children's nurse I can study this degree, and as soon as it was NHS funded I wouldn't need to worry about securing another loan (I didn't know it was stopping until just now). Does anyone know if I was to study nursing as a second degree, would I be able to get a second loan easily? Or would it be like other degrees and really difficult to get a loan to study another degree?
    You can only get student loans for first degree from what I been told
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    inb4 medieval jokes (although everyone has refrained so far...)
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    (Original post by Jordannnlouisee)
    I'm going to university in September and I was going to study child nursing, but than I changed my mind and applied for childhood studies instead just in case I decide that nursing wasn't for me. I applied for childhood studies, because I thought after this degree if I still decided I wanted to be a children's nurse I can study this degree, and as soon as it was NHS funded I wouldn't need to worry about securing another loan (I didn't know it was stopping until just now). Does anyone know if I was to study nursing as a second degree, would I be able to get a second loan easily? Or would it be like other degrees and really difficult to get a loan to study another degree?
    Yes you should be able to get a loan, part of the loan plan was to make exceptions for people who wanted to take nursing as a secondary degree. So unlike other degrees you can still get a loan out for nursing despite already having had one for a previous degree.
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    (Original post by Jordannnlouisee)
    I'm going to university in September and I was going to study child nursing, but than I changed my mind and applied for childhood studies instead just in case I decide that nursing wasn't for me. I applied for childhood studies, because I thought after this degree if I still decided I wanted to be a children's nurse I can study this degree, and as soon as it was NHS funded I wouldn't need to worry about securing another loan (I didn't know it was stopping until just now). Does anyone know if I was to study nursing as a second degree, would I be able to get a second loan easily? Or would it be like other degrees and really difficult to get a loan to study another degree?
    It hasn't been decided, but all previous NHS bursary courses will be exempt from the normal ELQ rules, so you can still get a second loan for an ex-bursary course. Though I don't think the details have been finalised yet.
 
 
 
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