Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    I'm sure you'll find a great way to pay him back!
    lol well there is one way to make me laugh
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by [Alias])
    lol well there is one way to make me laugh
    And I doubt he'll disagree about you paying him back that way...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by [Alias])
    About about £7,000 and I work my ass off 40 hours a week. There is no justice
    you have got to be kidding me..... 7,000 and you are a graduate? am i missing something here?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    And I doubt he'll disagree about you paying him back that way...
    LOL ^5
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DazzYaa003)
    you have got to be kidding me..... 7,000 and you are a graduate? am i missing something here?
    I'm not a graduate. I was supposed to be but the uni forced me out:

    I went to do a chemistry degree and was told I would be an international student b/c I have lived oversees, even though I have been a british citizen since birth, as have everyone in my family. I finsihed my first year with really good results and then the uni wrote to me saying I owe them 6,000 in fees. I said I can pay it back when I finish my degree (as was my understanding) they said I had 7 days to pay or else I would be thrown out. Needless to say I couldn't pay it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by [Alias])
    I'm not a graduate. I was supposed to be but the uni forced me out:

    I went to do a chemistry degree and was told I would be an international student b/c I have lived oversees, even though I have been a british citizen since birth, as have everyone in my family. I finsihed my first year with really good results and then the uni wrote to me saying I owe them 6,000 in fees. I said I can pay it back when I finish my degree (as was my understanding) they said I had 7 days to pay or else I would be thrown out. Needless to say I couldn't pay it.
    that sucks, chemistry is such a good subject as well! 7k is still way way, WAY too low! the average pay for a student of 16,17 years old working a 40 hour week should be at LEAST 10k
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I haven't read this entire thread; i haven't got time to go through every post so apologies if this is repeated.

    First, get your ass down to the Citizens' Advice Bureaux. They can give you good, constructive advice.

    You sound like you need to get your head organised and work out exactly why you're thought to live at two properties. My advice would be to double check that you are not liable for any other properties before compromising your position. Look at previous housing contracts you signed. It is just possible that you may remain liable.

    Now regarding your landlord. I can help in telling you where you stand legally if you can give me more detail. Is it an assured/assured shorthold? What has the landlord done so far, and has he put this in writing? You're welcome to send a private message, or post publicly if you wish.

    *Hopes to help*
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DazzYaa003)
    that sucks, chemistry is such a good subject as well! 7k is still way way, WAY too low! the average pay for a student of 16,17 years old working a 40 hour week should be at LEAST 10k
    should be yes but not. I earn £4.50 ah hour and I get nothing out of my job. I desperatly want to get a degree but I can't. The government says they want educated people here but yet they will help illegal immigrants more than their own citizens. ugh sorry....
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by muncrun)
    I haven't read this entire thread; i haven't got time to go through every post so apologies if this is repeated.

    First, get your ass down to the Citizens' Advice Bureaux. They can give you good, constructive advice.

    You sound like you need to get your head organised and work out exactly why you're thought to live at two properties. My advice would be to double check that you are not liable for any other properties before compromising your position. Look at previous housing contracts you signed. It is just possible that you may remain liable.

    Now regarding your landlord. I can help in telling you where you stand legally if you can give me more detail. Is it an assured/assured shorthold? What has the landlord done so far, and has he put this in writing? You're welcome to send a private message, or post publicly if you wish.

    *Hopes to help*

    Basically it is just a woman who owns the building I live in, she owns the flat and I dont really have any contact with her except to pay bills and rent. I owe her a months reant but it more the gas, electric, overdraft, and phone bill that are demanding money.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by [Alias])
    Basically it is just a woman who owns the building I live in, she owns the flat and I dont really have any contact with her except to pay bills and rent. I owe her a months reant but it more the gas, electric, overdraft, and phone bill that are demanding money.
    That overseas issue is kind of strange. You're classified as international or home way before you start the course. The regulations are pretty clear...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by [Alias])
    Basically it is just a woman who owns the building I live in, she owns the flat and I dont really have any contact with her except to pay bills and rent. I owe her a months reant but it more the gas, electric, overdraft, and phone bill that are demanding money.
    OK. Did the contract have a fixed duration? If so, then how long? If less than...i think...3 years then it is assured shorthold unless otherwise stated.

    You see, the type of tenancy will effect what the landlord may do to. If you can tell me this we can work from there.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    That overseas issue is kind of strange. You're classified as international or home way before you start the course. The regulations are pretty clear...
    yes but I was oversees and was led to believe I could pay my fees at the end of my course. It may sound silly but coming from another country I didn't know these things, nor about funding. No one really explained anything to me.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by muncrun)
    OK. Did the contract have a fixed duration? If so, then how long? If less than...i think...3 years then it is assured shorthold unless otherwise stated.

    You see, the type of tenancy will effect what the landlord may do to. If you can tell me this we can work from there.
    its a 12 month lease if that helps any?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by [Alias])
    its a 12 month lease if that helps any?
    It is most probably an assured shorthold then. Now without looking at your contract in detail it will be rather difficult to determine whether it is a lease or a licence. Now assuming the landlady does not enter the property to clean, or has expressed a right to enter the property whenever she wishes, then it is a lease. Even if you did not sign a contract a lease of less than three years can be created orally. So long as she didn't reserve the right to enter your property whenever she liked to provide services etc.

    Henceforth I shall advice assuming that your have a leasehold tenancy.


    At the end of the 12 months, a new tenancy will arise which can be terminated by the landlord by giving two months' notice. Ok that's the background.

    Forfeiture. This is where your landlord can bring the lease to a premature end and kick you out. A landlord seeking to forfeit for non-payment of rent must first make a formal demand for rent from the tenant. However, if she expressly excluded this requirement in the contract she does not have to make such a demand. Also, if you are more than six months in arrears and there are insufficient goods on the premises to satisfy the arrears by means of distress (see below) she doesnt have to make a demand. Given that yours is an assured shorthold tenancy, the landlord does not require the leave of the court.

    Distress This is where the landlord can come onto your property and take goods to satisfy the payment of rent. In your case she does not need the leave of the court to do this. Distress may be exercised by the landlord personally or by a certified bailiff. Cannot be exercised at night. Access cannot be gained forcibly to the premises.
    Some goods are exempt from seizure - perishible goods, things in use by the tenant at the time he chooses to distrain (just make sure your all your household appliances are switched on if he comes round!), trade tools to the value of £150, bedding and clothes to a value of £100, and money which is not in a closed purse/bag. Goods belonging to third parties are also exempt. Goods of undertenants and lodgers are also exempt (your boyfriend living there, perhaps?).
    Once distress has been exercised, the landlord must give you notice , informing you of reason and where goods have been removed to. Goods may not be sold until at least five days later.

    Action for arrears Landlord may take you to court to recover payments.


    Now, these are the options available to him. In reality she would most likely carry out the forfeiture option. It is important you know your rights here. If you think you are seriously at risk of being kicked out, I would advise that you find out exactly what type of tenancy you have for sure. My advice above isbased on the info you've given me - however double check that she hasn't expressly excluded it being an assured shorthold.

    If you need any further advice, I'm free to give it.

    Hope I have been of help.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by muncrun)
    Now, these are the options available to him. In reality she would most likely carry out the forfeiture option. It is important you know your rights here. If you need any further advice, I'm free to give it.

    Hope I have been of help.
    don't people like you normally charge 100 pounds/hour for this sort of thing

    MB
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    How much equality you do have in your house?
    I think you were trying to refer to ‘equity’.

    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    They are not allowed to come after you, you don't have to let anybody in or do anything unless they have a court under. My parents are in debt in two figures and if you know the law they can't really do anything at all.
    Two figures of debt, eh? They must have real trouble sleeping at night.

    Anyway, in her case they don’t need a court order (see my previous post).
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: June 23, 2004
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.