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    Hey I know this is a little old but I thought i'd give a bit of input. I was diagnosed with ADD and Dyslexia at the start of uni.

    Sometimes you only notice things once you're older and have more pressure or a better understanding of how you feel compared to others. For me the added reading for uni and just being older and more aware of how I feel and what is normal is what made it clear. When I was a kid I assumed it was how everybody was and nobody else noticed because I wasn't a disruption (as they expect people with ADHD to be) and still did well at school (just had to put in more effort).
    Since this is the case it isn't that strange to go to the doc about it when you are adult and they shouldn't suspect you are just trying to get meds to abuse (tbh you can just buy them online so that would be a waste of time for abusers).

    A gp can't diagnose adult learning difficulties or special needs so you will be refered. When you see the psychologist they will give you some "tests". This will be mostly questions about symptoms (some may seem irrelivant as they are aimed at ruling out othr things to what you suspect), but I had a couple of logic puzzle like tests. Things like rotating shapes to make other shapes and stuff.
    Before your appointment it is a good idea to think about how you are now and were as achild and if there were any unusual things. Reading up on ADHD or doing some online tests (not good for a diagnosis and just for an idea of symptoms) will can help you think about what to look for.
    At your appointment be honest. If you aren't it could change results.

    Once diagnosed (if you are) you have some options for treatment. These really only consist of meds, doing nothing and lifestyle changes (like diet or scheduling). Doctors and online research will help here. If you want to try meds you'll need to talk to your doctor. They don't work for everybody and there are a couple to try so don't expect an instant fix.
    There are lifestyle changes that can help manage it or even act to dull it and you can talk to your doctor about what they suggest. You can also look online for advice. Things like caffie and Enumbers are said to make it worse so you may benefit from trying to reduce them. There are also forms of managment that can help you work with it. ADHD is often characterised by poor time managment so finding a way of better managing your time may help. You may also be able to adapt your work style by taking breaks, avoiding distractions as much as possible or giving yourself planned schedules to stick to. Experiment a bit. Not everything will work for everyone. You are an individual and have other things influencing you than just your ADHD so remember to treat yourself as an individual and not expect yourself to be like others. Way too much pressure to be putting on yourself.

    Also remember that you have not changed. You have always had this and it hasn't suddenly come and mutated you. It can sometimes feel sudden and life changing, but you are still the same you as before the diagnosis, just with a bit more understanding.

    ADHD isn't a disability or something broken with you. It is a different way of thinking and your brain is wired a bit differently. Society isn't really set up for it which is why you have issues. If you find the way to work with it it can actually be a help. It helps you see the world in a different way and that can be a great tool.
    Try not to think of it as something bad and to look for the positives.
    People I know with ADHD are amazingly thoughful about others or have an inspired way of looking at things or have an amazing ability to run with a project and get stuck in. You can find that great thing about you too if you look for it and don't try to force yourself to be "normal" (whatever that is).

    That's all from my experience and I may have got some things a little off or they may vary for different people, but I hope it helps at least a little to somebody.
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    ...
    Have you found meds or anything else helpful in the end?
    You seem to have had a few things not work for you, was it worth keeping trying?

    I ask cos I'm not really sure about meds or anythig for myself. I tried strettera and concerta at one point. One made me twitc uncontrolably and one jus didn't seem to help. I'm not sure if i should keep trying or just try to manage it other ways.

    I have/ had some other health problems too so I guess they could be affecting it. I had mh issues when I was first diagnosed so I thik that and the meds I was on for that could have possibly interfered. Now I have a problem thats affects include tiredness and fogy head etc (so add like stuff) so I'm waiting to make any changes until that is sorted to see if that helps at all.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    things
    Thank you so much, I think this is the most encouraging single thing that's been said to me about my situation

    You mentioned lifestyle, I was thinking about bringing it up in my appointment... I used to be pretty overweight and have been a lot more healthy in the past year or so but I don't think better diet/more exercise have had any impact at all
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thank you so much, I think this is the most encouraging single thing that's been said to me about my situation

    You mentioned lifestyle, I was thinking about bringing it up in my appointment... I used to be pretty overweight and have been a lot more healthy in the past year or so but I don't think better diet/more exercise have had any impact at all
    I'm glad it made you feel encouraged. I know I needed a lot of that when I was working things out. All the stigma and negative information about it can really make it feel serious. But at the end of the day you've been living with it all this time already so te only way to go is up

    It won't always help. I think the main things are caffine and stuff so I think if you drank loads of energy drinks it would make it worse. I'm not sure how much better it makes it for me either. I get the idea it probably depends on the person too and what triggers them. I have a cousin who goes crazy on caffine, but my brother is fine with it. I think as long as you aren't unhealthy it's enough. I'm not sure if it's AD(H)D related, but if I have too little to eat or drink I get really upset and angsty, same with my brother. So I always make sure I have a snack in my bag just incase.

    For me I think the biggest help has been working out my learning style and other things like that. I find that I get less distracted when listening to people if i do silly littl doodles or fiddle with something- really annoyed one of my therapists :P I like to think of it as keeping the doing things part of my brain busy so it doesn't try to distract me. Not at all scientific, but hey.
    To be honest by the time you are an adult you will probably have come up with some coping mechanisms subconciously. I realised that I always looked for video information if I could and skim read things because my dyslexia made it hard to read. Not something I noticed until I realised I had dyslexia though. Try to think about how you work best and how you would naturally act and work with that rather than trying to follow some supposed ideal work strategy.

    Good luck working things out. Remember it can only improve
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    Have you found meds or anything else helpful in the end?
    You seem to have had a few things not work for you, was it worth keeping trying?

    I ask cos I'm not really sure about meds or anythig for myself. I tried strettera and concerta at one point. One made me twitc uncontrolably and one jus didn't seem to help. I'm not sure if i should keep trying or just try to manage it other ways.

    I have/ had some other health problems too so I guess they could be affecting it. I had mh issues when I was first diagnosed so I thik that and the meds I was on for that could have possibly interfered. Now I have a problem thats affects include tiredness and fogy head etc (so add like stuff) so I'm waiting to make any changes until that is sorted to see if that helps at all.

    Thanks
    In terms of ADHD I only took the one medication that didn't work (atomoxetine) Then put on ritalin and it's been a wonder drug

    I too have diagnosed MH problems but the ritalin hasn't interfered

    From the MH meds I get super drowsy during the day and the ritalin has made me back to normal in the regard
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    In terms of ADHD I only took the one medication that didn't work (atomoxetine) Then put on ritalin and it's been a wonder drug

    I too have diagnosed MH problems but the ritalin hasn't interfered

    From the MH meds I get super drowsy during the day and the ritalin has made me back to normal in the regard
    Less drowsy would be amazing. Hopefully some new tablets im on will be sorting that but if not I might consider something like ritalin.
    Came off my ADs a few months ago so that won't interfeer which is why i'm considering ADD stuff again.
    To be honest I take so many different tablets at the moment I think even taking one more type would be really annoying for me. At the moment i'm off uni for other health reason so I might look into ADD stuff for if I start studying again.

    Thanks for the reply
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    Less drowsy would be amazing. Hopefully some new tablets im on will be sorting that but if not I might consider something like ritalin.
    Came off my ADs a few months ago so that won't interfeer which is why i'm considering ADD stuff again.
    To be honest I take so many different tablets at the moment I think even taking one more type would be really annoying for me. At the moment i'm off uni for other health reason so I might look into ADD stuff for if I start studying again.

    Thanks for the reply
    best of luck with it
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    • Thread Starter
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    Thought I'd keep people updated since you've all been so helpful

    I saw a specialist this week, I've been given a questionnaire to fill out and will be diagnosed (or not) at my next appointment and possibly starting to take methylphenidate. I'm not expecting anything miraculous but I'm feeling good about the way things are headed... thanks everyone who answered my questions and shared their own experiences!
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    ADD and ADHD are nothing to be ashamed of and don't have to develop or even be diagnosed during childhood, many people can even just suffer through childhood with it and only go for a diagnosis in adulthood. It's good that you are going to talk to your GP about it because while it can be untreated often treatment can make the world of difference.

    My experience with the disorder has been an interesting one. I was diagnosed with ADD at age 6 or 7 (it's a bit hard to remember exactly) but basically I was unable to complete most basic tasks, I was having a lot of problems with impulse control; I was causing myself harm, cutting my hair, and to the extent where people in my vicinity were at risk of an outburst. This in and of itself was a huge problem but was causing emotional problems too as I always have and always will be a pacifist and hold a hatred for causing others harm. So after a particularly bad month my parents took me for extensive testing.

    My doctor could immediately see I had ADD, but she sent me to several specialists just to be sure. It took a few weeks for my official diagnosis but there was not a single doubt in any of the doctors minds that I had the disorder. We immediately discussed treatment, I was placed onto an appropriate dosage of Ritalin and the results were astounding, I was scoring well in school, my outbursts were considerably decreased and I was overall happier.

    Of course my teachers and family were involved in making sure I was doing ok and still are to this day. However medication won't just fix it, there is a lot of work that goes behind it too. It has taken me years to start learning how to control myself, physically, verbally and towards myself. However this does not mean I have it under control, I still have outbursts and still have days where it just feels like I'm 6 again. It's a long road but I would not have made it this far without treatment.

    An update on my life now: I am now an A-A+ student, with a great group of friends, emotionally stable, and I am currently attempting the IB diploma.

    I'd like to highlight that ADD and ADHD are different for every person, my sister has ADHD and her disorder manifested more in distractibility with moderate impulse control issues and moderate to mild hyperactivity. Whereas mine manifested in severe lack of impulse control a high level of distractibility and little to no hyperactivity. Yet we both have ADD/ADHD and are treated in the same way.

    So I am so glad you are going to seek treatment, I honestly think that if you have the disorder and are tested correctly you will receive proper treatment. On the off chance you don't there are many other methods of coping.
    Good Luck!

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I think I might have ADHD, I've got an appointment with a GP this week but I was wondering how I'd go about explaining it to them...

    I'm aware that there are people who abuse the medicines that get prescribed to treat ADHD and because I wasn't diagnosed with it when I was a child, I'm worried that the GP will just think I'm after a prescription which isn't the case.

    Also, the NHS website mentions that there are types of therapy available, but then describes things only useful for parents whose children have ADHD, like talking to teachers etc... so if anyone has any experience with that kind of thing I'd really appreciate your input

    Thanks!
    • TSR Support Team
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thought I'd keep people updated since you've all been so helpful

    I saw a specialist this week, I've been given a questionnaire to fill out and will be diagnosed (or not) at my next appointment and possibly starting to take methylphenidate. I'm not expecting anything miraculous but I'm feeling good about the way things are headed... thanks everyone who answered my questions and shared their own experiences!
    Hey. I'm glad tings seem to be falling into place a bit. I found that just understanding things helped loads (the two meds I tried didn't do much or gave me side effects so I gave up with them). If you know how it works and how to manage it you will hopefull find a big improvement.

    Good luck with potential treatment. It didn't work for me but it does for others. It could take a while to notice any particular change so keep positive
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    Hi al looking for anyone at Huddersfield uni with ADHD or ADD to form a society I have ADHD my diagnosed since was 10/11 stopped taking meds at 13 took me 3 years to get back on them as an adult due to funding. Anyway if anyone is at Huddersfield uni please search for my post and also group it's just pending authorisation thanks
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    (Original post by Mradhd)
    Hi al looking for anyone at Huddersfield uni with ADHD or ADD to form a society I have ADHD my diagnosed since was 10/11 stopped taking meds at 13 took me 3 years to get back on them as an adult due to funding. Anyway if anyone is at Huddersfield uni please search for my post and also group it's just pending authorisation thanks
    You may find posting your own thread in the unis section or health section helpful. You could also ask uni if you can advertise your society on their fb page or website or if you can put up posters.

    For what it's worth if I went to your uni I would be interested in joining. I think it's a great idea for a society.
    Also, if AD(H)D is a bit too specific to get people interested you could possibly consider opening it up to various other learning disabilities.
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    You may find posting your own thread in the unis section or health section helpful. You could also ask uni if you can advertise your society on their fb page or website or if you can put up posters.

    For what it's worth if I went to your uni I would be interested in joining. I think it's a great idea for a society.
    Also, if AD(H)D is a bit too specific to get people interested you could possibly consider opening it up to various other learning disabilities.
    I was going to say the same. You could open it up to people with other learning difficulities/disabilities.

    I'd also join if I went to your Uni.
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    Thanks I'm going to talk to disability office at uni. Also do some of you find your self getting tired throughout day and feel like needing a nap. Get tired quickly in shopping centres and busy areas and get pressure headaches a lot.

    As I was suffering from these and no medication could keep me awake so I thought to myself this can't be a brain chemical problem if the meds can not keep me awake not even modafinil. So I thought it must be something else that's not working right something physical.

    So I went to get eyes tested and needed glasses but that still didn't help fully. I thought about the times I get tired e.g shopping centres and thought what's going on people, sounds and lights and I thought I also get tired quickly while reading I'm not dyslexic by the way. So a quick google and I came across visual stress proper name irlens syndrome not sure how many people have heard of that but a lot of symptoms are similar with ADHD and is a main cause for people under achieving when there's no reason for them too.

    So I went and got a test done and I do suffer from that too along side ADHD and have an assessment Sunday to see which colour is best when reading things. I have a blue over lay now but after the proper colour test Sunday I will know better which colour. Also when using the blue overlay my reading speed increased by over 10% which was a clear indication of the syndrome. I advise anyone who suffers from daily tiredness and things I've mentioned above to look into visual stress thanks people
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    Have you found meds or anything else helpful in the end?
    You seem to have had a few things not work for you, was it worth keeping trying?

    I ask cos I'm not really sure about meds or anythig for myself. I tried strettera and concerta at one point. One made me twitc uncontrolably and one jus didn't seem to help. I'm not sure if i should keep trying or just try to manage it other ways.

    I have/ had some other health problems too so I guess they could be affecting it. I had mh issues when I was first diagnosed so I thik that and the meds I was on for that could have possibly interfered. Now I have a problem thats affects include tiredness and fogy head etc (so add like stuff) so I'm waiting to make any changes until that is sorted to see if that helps at all.

    Thanks
    I've tried all the meds pretty much Ritalin, concerta, anomoxatine however you spell it lisdexampethamine and none worked to many sides and not enough benefit. The best one I would recommend is modafinil that's what I'm on now sides are minimal you can still eat and It has nootropic benefits like helps with memory and also helps the left and right had side of your brain work better together. Took me a while to get my doctors to give it me as it's classed as off the label use in the UK but used with adults in the US. So if you tried other and haven't worked give that a try.
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    Want To Explain ADHD?

    Here’s a useful guide 10 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT PEOPLE WITH ADHD

    Adults with ADHD were once children with ADHD. It doesn’t just lay dormant then pop up later in life. Those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder have dealt with it their entire lives. Since it goes undiagnosed with most people, they may not realize that they’ve had it until they get older. They may have been diagnosed by mental health professionals who believe they suffer with depression, avoidance disorder, anxiety, and/or addictive behaviours, then later are more accurately diagnosed with ADHD. The former behaviours often branch from the latter. Once people with ADHD understand the disorder and process how it affects their thinking and behaviours, it becomes easier to understand themselves- and love themselves. That’s not to say that people with ADHD are the easiest folks for others to love. They’re hot then they’re cold, they’re hyper-engaged or their totally disengaged, they’re as pleasant as a peach or as hot as fire. Here are 10 things you should know about people who live with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    1. They may be tuning you out People with ADHD are engaged to a fault when talking about something that interests them. If it’s acting, they can rehearse lines for hours on end. If it’s music, they can practice their instrument without realizing they forgot to break for a meal. What they cannot do is feign interest when a subject doesn’t capture their attention. They often drift off into space when sitting in classrooms in grades K-12. They are not wired to be able to sit in a room full of cinderblocks with fluorescent lights and force engagement. They focus intensely on things that captivate them- to the point that they cannot stand any ambient noise or distractions. Even an air conditioner clicking on and off can rattle them! But to sit them down and try to talk to them about boring crap will get you a blank stare, and possibly even a distracted glance down at a mobile device. They are terrible party-goers, as they feel fraught with social anxiety. They worry they’ll say the wrong thing, or get caught in a conversation that they cannot get out of. If you have a spouse with ADHD, know that they listen best to bullet point information. They want to know how your day was, but they do best with brief, succinct information.

    2. They are fraught with insecurity They realize that they are wired differently than other people, but that doesn’t make it ok. They want to be accepted and appreciated. They long to stand out and do great things with their gifts. They take risks, and go for all-or-nothing. They never feel that good enough is really good enough. They have perfectionistic tendencies. They are conflict averse, but sometimes bring conflict on, themselves, by speaking whatever is on their mind in emotional moments. They never stop thinking, hashing and re-hashing situations. They wonder how they can improve relationships with themselves and others. They long for peace, but constantly feel at war.

    3. They aren’t “sugar-rush” hyperactive Sometimes, people with ADHD struggle to even find the motivation to get off of the couch. They are constantly thinking about what the value is of doing something. If they cannot justify a value in getting up and going on a jog, they’ll sit around and process it for hours. They are intuitive. They cannot turn off their brains. They may be laying around with thumbs twiddling or a knee shaking, but they aren’t necessarily running in circles like you may perceive someone with “ADHD” to do.

    4. They struggle with mundane tasks Waiting in line always seems longer to them than it actually is. They’ll say they were in traffic ‘half their lives’ when they sat in traffic 20-minutes. They lose their minds when waiting on hold with a 1-800 number. They leave things where they don’t belong, because they don’t make the time to put them away. They’re disorganized. They procrastinate on doing things that they don’t enjoy doing. They forget dates and meetings. They enthusiastically plan and begin projects, but often jump to something new before the project is done.

    5. They get divorced more often than the general population The divorce rate is nearly twice as high for couples where one partner has ADHD. Acknowledging the reality of (diagnosis of) ADHD, accepting the implications that it has on the relationship, and learning tactics that work can be hugely helpful. It is expected that ADHD affects roughly 4 percent of the adult population.

    6. They often deal with depression, addiction, and anxiety As mentioned in the opening statement, these behaviours are not independent of a bigger issue. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder may be the root mental health problem. Depression, avoidance disorder, anxiety, insecurity, and addictive behaviours may be “side-effects” experienced by people with ADHD.

    7. They are everybody’s friend and nobody’s They are so self-conscious that they build a wall up and don’t really let other people in. They’re friendly, outgoing, fun-loving, and energetic. People tend to gravitate towards them. They have hundreds of people who think they’re their best friend. But they really only cherish the relationships with a few people, and they’re scared to death that those friends will abandon them.

    8. They don’t sleep well People with ADHD do best on a schedule. They aren’t night owls. They can best control their symptoms when they are well rested. Going to sleep takes focus for them, since their minds are constantly racing. So, they need a dark, cool, quiet room with a comfortable bed. Even still, they tend to be fidgety, restless sleepers. They’ll toss and turn all night long- but God forbid their partner make a snore! They are terrible bedfellows. If they wake up in the middle of the night because something is on their mind, they will struggle to let it go and fall back asleep.

    9. They are anxious There is never any riding the wave for people with ADHD. They constantly feel like they are swimming upstream. Because their anxiety level is high, they do best in jobs where they can be creative but not where they have to handle a lot of added stress. They get bored in mundane jobs, but are easily pushed over the edge in high-stress careers.

    10. They are all over the emotional compass People with ADHD are emotionally charged. They love deeply, and protect those they care about like a mother bear loves her cub. They express their love without holding back. On the flip side, little things may set them off into a seemingly bipolar personality. They storm through the room like a tornado, then move on and carry on as if nothing happened. The debris left from their emotional storm may affect those they care about long after the person with ADHD has forgotten about it completely. They need to be made aware of the consequences of their “emotional seizures.” In a safe way, loved ones need to express how these outbursts can make them feel. Being aware of the ramifications of their outbursts can help a person with ADHD learn to control his/her temper. Awareness is huge with this particular issue. People with ADHD don’t tend to realize that the volatile needle on their emotional compass hurts other people. Once it is brought to their attention, they can work on dialling down the needle on their compass.
 
 
 
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