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Is Depression OVER-DIAGNOSED? Watch

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    It probably is tbh

    They were really persuasive about me taking those drugs
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    Diagnosis of depression =/= the colloquialism 'I'm so depressed'
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    Depression is a serious illness.

    I think many people diagnosed for depression have indeed been over-diagnosed.

    They are just victims of our increasingly stressful, materialistic world.
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    (Original post by stefano865)
    Depression is a serious illness.

    I think many people diagnosed for depression have indeed been over-diagnosed.

    They are just victims of our increasingly stressful, materialistic world.
    1000% this!
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    (Original post by BlackSweetness)
    Is it possible that Depression is being Over-Diagnosed?
    i Personally feel it definitely is, the amount of times ive heard someone spout the word 'depression', or i am so 'depressed'! Ive heard people Say they are depression over menial things.
    Here are a few sources that back my claim up;
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...ns-expert.html

    http://www.theatlantic.com/health/ar...iteria/275436/

    https://news.liverpool.ac.uk/2014/01...-over-treated/
    It may seem like it, and to be honest it's difficult to tell, for the most part though, I agree with you, and most of the comments.
    Depression is one of the most well documented mental illnesses in the world, as it effects so many people globally, but due to the stigma and discrimination surrounding it, people in the past have avoided seeking professional help for it, etc. Unfortunately, there still is some level of stigma, but much more help is available, which wasn't even offered before, and because depression is now recognised as an illness and there is some degree of education around it and other mental illnesses (informing people of symptoms to look out for etc), more people have reached out, and have received help, and have got a diagnosis, and thus treatment. Medication has also improved and antidepressants have even managed to cure depression in some cases. All of these factors have meant an increase in people contacting support services, getting a diagnosis and receiving treatment, but hasn't necessarily meant that the number of cases of people with depression has increased.
    So it's misleading.


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    (Original post by SemperLiber)
    I knew a girl who was diagnosed with "depression". But it was more that she lacked the confidence to go outside and socialise. Her reason for her not going outside was that she had an anxiety disorder, and the messed but belief that hiding from the problem was the cure. She also used it as a reason not to work, and instead lived on benefits.

    Safe to say I left her behind and moved on with my life. You can't help someone who isn't willing to help them self.
    Eh. Not being able to go outside is a serious medical condition. I should know. I was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 2011 and that left with an intense dislike of being in public places to the point that I don't really go out much at all these days. I guess you could say I have agoraphobia (although no one has actually bothered to diagnose it as such, there really isn't any point as there is no medication for the condition).

    Getting over it isn't as simple as just "maning up to it". Anything negative that happens when you do try further reinforces the fear making it harder to try the next time. Take the cumulative effects of this over a 5 year period and you have pretty strongly held beliefs on the subject.
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    (Original post by McNuggetsAhoy)
    Getting over it isn't as simple as just "maning up to it". Anything negative that happens when you do try further reinforces the fear making it harder to try the next time. Take the cumulative effects of this over a 5 year period and you have pretty strongly held beliefs on the subject.
    If you can just "get over it", then I'd question whether you really do have depresssion.

    I once had some clueless woman tell me I have anxiety. Out of curiousity, I looked up on Google what it was. (never been diagnosed with it and have no idea what it really is) I don't meet any of the criteria of it either. Well, what a bloody surprise. My original diagnosis was OCD, which was right and so was my diagnosis of depression both times.

    I have a relative who constantly claims he has depression when actually, it sounds moe like he's just upset. People do need to learn the difference, seriously.

    Not all GPs are quick enough to hand out medication and you can refuse it.
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    Noone will ever understand what depression is until they go through it themselves. It's a killer. So I wouldn't say it's over diagnosed, it's a mental health problem just like how everyone takes cancer seriously depression is a serious thing too.


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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    If you can just "get over it", then I'd question whether you really do have depresssion.

    I once had some clueless woman tell me I have anxiety. Out of curiousity, I looked up on Google what it was. (never been diagnosed with it and have no idea what it really is) I don't meet any of the criteria of it either. Well, what a bloody surprise. My original diagnosis was OCD, which was right and so was my diagnosis of depression both times.

    I have a relative who constantly claims he has depression when actually, it sounds moe like he's just upset. People do need to learn the difference, seriously.

    Not all GPs are quick enough to hand out medication and you can refuse it.
    I was told by my GP when I first started having problems with mental health that I had depression. Funny thing was the one thing I didn't feel was depressed. I just felt flat and emotionless as if nothing had any effect on me at all.
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    I had severe chronic depression that led to numerous suicide attempts in my late teens. I became utterly emotionless, with no motivation to carry on living, I actually suffered from some schizophrenic episodes as a result of the sense of isolation, my mum said she knew there was something wrong with me when she spotted me talking to people who weren't there and laughing maniacally in a way which reminded her of her mother (my gran) who was on lifelong medication for mental health problems.

    I didn't take any anti-depressents, didn't go through cognitive behavioural therepy and my GP was useless. She just sent me to some community centre group for people who lacked self-confidence. They weren't depressed, they were just sad because their business had failed or they'd been divorced. It made me feel fraudulent, because although I had actual depression, it wasn't a response to anything in particular, it was just something I fell into.

    I got better by pretending I was better, until I tricked my brain into believing it. It was accidental, as I was just buying time until I got to go to uni, where I was planning on committing suicide without anyone being able to stop me. But by pretending to be better, I became better. Whereas friends of mine who are on anti-depressants have been unable to move past it, or have developed addictions to the drugs. Different things work for different people, but doctors are too quick to go the anti-depressant route.
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    (Original post by BlackSweetness)
    This! i work in a call centre part time, and i have lost count of the amount of times i have seen women cry on the phone because of a rude customer.
    Ive always wondered, why they took it so seriously.
    There's a difference between crying easily and having diagnosable clinical depression.
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    You also have to remember that depression is a relatively new diagnosis. I mean this in the sense that 50 years ago, hardly anyone was diagnosed with depression and if they were it was suicidal, severe depression. So the more we progress and understand about mental illnessess, the wider the net is spread.

    Depression also takes different forms. There is moderate to severe, and unipolar and bipolar. I had a phase of depression late last year, and it was only a phase, it wasn't an extended diagnosis. This is because I "fit" the category for depression (at least 2 weeks where on most of the days you feel more than a handful of: fatigue, helplessness, unmotivation, melancholy, loss/gain of appetite, uninterest, mood swings, etc.) I wasn't getting out of bed, wasn't leaving the house, wasn't eating, was crying all the time, getting angry over little things, had no interest in doing things I normally enjoy.

    My depression was brought on by stress and the uncertainty about my future (thanks post-grad medicine applications!) I've had similar experiences before my exams when I was diagnosed with stress-induced anxiety [also it is probably of note that I've had other MH problems for far longer]. I've never taken medication for anything because I don't need to, and more importantly, I've never been offered it. CBT and talking therapies SHOULD be first line for everyone, and now I frequently go to the counsellor if I know I'm feeling down or something is not quite right.

    I would say to anyone: go see a counsellor at least twice a year. Just to make sure you're on track. There are many free ones at university and group sessions too for particular problems. Don't be afraid to start a conversation with your GP and friends about mental health, and the daily effects that problems have on your life. Don't request medication from your doctor, and try to live a healthy lifestyle outside of mental health - keep fit, smile every day and fuel your body well. It's the little things that get us through each day.
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    Possibly.

    Ive had a few people who work in MH say such. My issue is anxiety. I can often have existential crises and occasionally flirt with darker thoughts but it's been awhile since i was depresssed. Im often sad but it's no longer the fog of nothingness which for me is depression.

    And yet a Dr who i went to about my anxiety asked whether i wanted anti depressants.
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    (Original post by BlackSweetness)
    Definitely, Ive always felt the people who make their depression to the public such as Facebook, twitter etc, could possibly not really be depressed, but using the word depression as a blanket for their own selfish reasons!
    I don't think that people who have MH issues necessarily suffer like good little patients in private. But i can appreciate that it can be annoying and frustrating to see who is genuine.

    When i lived in a care home, there was a girl who would self harm whenever attention on her lapsed and honestly i detested her by the time i left.
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    The problem with depression (and MH in general) is there's no test. Whereas if you have thyroid problems, you have blood tests, etc.

    When I was at uni and diagnosed with depression, I was given a questionaire. But with that, it's just me saying yes and no.
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    Sometimes I do think its over diagnosed. I don't think its over diagnosed where in the patients don't actually have any form of depression but over diagnosed in the fact that doctors seem to think that is the only problem the patient has rather than dig deeper to see if they have any other MH condition that could be causing it. Each time I have had depression, its been secondary to another MH condition. I think this is because to them, depression is 'easier' to diagnose and treat. To qualify as depressed all you have to do is fill out a questionaire and then you get given pills, no biggy to them but to diagnose a more complex MH condition such as OCD, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia etc - you have to observe them, refer them onto different departments such as psychiatry, prescribe a few forms of medication etc.

    Every time I went to a GP for any form of mental health problem be it panic disorder or OCD, depression is the first thing they would say it was despite me being diagnosed by a psychologist and psychiatrist years before with OCD and offer me antidepressants and I had to fight to get a referral for therapy for OCD. They knew I couldn't take meds due to my contamination fears and that I felt suicidal on the 2 antidepressants I did try in the past yet they still hand them out willy nilly. I knew my OCD was causing my depression and not the other way about. I had OCD pretty much all my life, not depression. To me it was like OCD being cancer and depression being like a side effect like sickness with the cancer. You can treat the sickness all you want and you should but you do have to treat the underlying condition - the cancer/OCD- to get rid of everything and be cured.

    Depression is a serious illness and I wouldn't wish it on anyone but I think they have to dig a little deeper when diagnosing and not just passing it off as depression instantly as it can be detrimental if someone does have something more deep down.
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    Some of you may remember a thread by me asking about Auditory Processing Disorder, which is a hearing problem; but we're not actually deaf. (we don't process sound in the way other people do) I've now become extremely frustrated in the way everything is going. One GP has suggested what I actually have is depression. I am (if you ignore all the stuff that happened last week) mentally fine.

    I have no signs of depression.
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    There's a difference between crying easily and having diagnosable clinical depression.
    I know that, he said women are emotionally weaker in some circunstances than men, and i agreed! Dont twist my words for reps!
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    (Original post by BlackSweetness)
    I know that, he said women are emotionally weaker in some circunstances than men, and i agreed! Dont twist my words for reps!
    Sorry man, didn't read your post in context. And it wasn't for reps... I get personally annoyed when people don't understand the difference between depression and feeling emotional etc.
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    (Original post by Kvothe the arcane)
    Possibly.

    Ive had a few people who work in MH say such. My issue is anxiety. I can often have existential crises and occasionally flirt with darker thoughts but it's been awhile since i was depresssed. Im often sad but it's no longer the fog of nothingness which for me is depression.

    And yet a Dr who i went to about my anxiety asked whether i wanted anti depressants.
    Many drugs work for both anxiety and depression, as well as a whole host of other anxiety disorders. It's the same processing pathways in the brain, the same neurotransmitters used, so the drug works the same way.
 
 
 
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