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Why is it so hard to keep kosher? Watch

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    Let's face it,it is very hard to purchase meat which was slaughtered in a kosher way I never saw kosher meat being sold in any of the large chain supermarkets I know it is sold in areas where there are large Jewish communities however if you move to Singapore or a country where there are nearly any Jews then there will be no kosher meat.If you did not eat meat and diary together and did the other things to keep kosher but ate meat that is not slaughtered in a kosher way would it still be ok or is there no point if your meat is not kosher?
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    I live in a country in europe where there are practically no Jews at all, so when I started keeping kosher I just became a vegetarian. It is possible to not eat meat at all if kosher is an important mitzva to you. For me, eating non-kosher meat seems just like eating pork or shellfish...but it's different for everyone.
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    try halal meat? there are many more halal butchers in the uk

    I don't know if jews are allowed to eat "muslim" meat, but I know as a muslim we are allowed to eat kosher meat/ jewish kosher food
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    (Original post by alkaline.)
    I don't know if jews are allowed to eat "muslim" meat
    No, religious Jews are not allowed to eat halal food.
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    (Original post by eli.ora)
    I live in a country in europe where there are practically no Jews at all, so when I started keeping kosher I just became a vegetarian. It is possible to not eat meat at all if kosher is an important mitzva to you. For me, eating non-kosher meat seems just like eating pork or shellfish...but it's different for everyone.
    I really enjoy seafood I feel bad about it but I don't enjoy chicken to be honest I prefer beef but overall there is no comparison to seafood.
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    (Original post by admonit)
    No, religious Jews are not allowed to eat halal food.
    Do you know why this might be? Because Halal and Kosher pretty much use the same method of slaughtering (a single incision with a sharp knife which immedietly causes unconsciousness) and the blessing with prayer. Essentially, the prayer would be directed to the same God.
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    (Original post by fire_and_ice)
    Do you know why this might be? Because Halal and Kosher pretty much use the same method of slaughtering (a single incision with a sharp knife which immedietly causes unconsciousness) and the blessing with prayer. Essentially, the prayer would be directed to the same God.
    just googled it;
    http://news.reformjudaism.org.uk/ass...alal-meat.html

    can never fully trust online sources but this gives me some idea ^

    also I found that apparently jews don't eat animal fat either
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    (Original post by alkaline.)
    just googled it;
    http://news.reformjudaism.org.uk/ass...alal-meat.html

    can never fully trust online sources but this gives me some idea ^

    also I found that apparently jews don't eat animal fat either
    It still doesn't really answer my question, though. It says, "However, Jews are not allowed to eat halal meat - because a blessing to Allah is said over each animal before it is slaughtered."

    However, I'm certain that the God of the Jews is also the God of Muslims. :confused:
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    (Original post by fire_and_ice)
    It still doesn't really answer my question, though. It says, "However, Jews are not allowed to eat halal meat - because a blessing to Allah is said over each animal before it is slaughtered."

    However, I'm certain that the God of the Jews is the same as the God of the Muslims. :confused:
    idek fam *calling all Jews*

    I don't understand the reciting thing either
    on wiki it says:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Differences
    • Dhabiha requires that God's name be pronounced before each slaughter.[14] (see Islamic Concept of God). Dhabiha meat by definition is meat that is slaughtered in the shariah manner and the name of Allah is said before the slaughter. In Shechita, a blessing to God is recited before beginning an uninterrupted period of slaughtering; as long as the shochet does not have a lengthy pause, interrupt, or otherwise lose concentration, this blessing covers all the animals slaughtered in that period. This blessing follows the standard form for a blessing before most Jewish rituals ("Blessèd are you God ... who commanded us regarding [such-and-such]", in this case, Shechita). The general rule in Judaism is that for rituals which have an associated blessing, if one omitted the blessing, the ritual is still valid [see Maimonides Laws of Blessings 11:5]; as such, even if the shochet failed to recite the blessing before Shechita, the slaughter is still valid and the meat is kosher.[18]
    I'm guessing this means that whatever is recited is recited at different times during the slaughter
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    OP: to answer why it's so difficult to find kosher meat where there aren't many Jews, maybe this will help:
    • There are no restrictions on what organs or parts of the carcass may be eaten from a Halal-slaughtered and -dressed animal; as long as it was slaughtered and prepared according to the rules of Halal, the entire animal, with the exception of blood (Qur'an 2:173), is fit for consumption by Muslims. However, Kashrut prohibits eating the chelev (certain types of fat) and gid hanosheh (the sciatic nerve), and thus the hindquarters of a kosher animal must undergo a process called nikkur (or, in Yiddish, porging) in order to be fit for consumption by Jews. As nikkur is an expensive, time-consuming process, it is rarely practiced outside of Israel, and the hindquarters of kosher-slaughtered animals in the rest of the world are generally sold on the non-kosher market.[19]
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    (Original post by alkaline.)
    idek fam *calling all Jews*

    I don't understand the reciting thing either
    on wiki it says:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Differences
    • Dhabiha requires that God's name be pronounced before each slaughter.[14] (see Islamic Concept of God). Dhabiha meat by definition is meat that is slaughtered in the shariah manner and the name of Allah is said before the slaughter. In Shechita, a blessing to God is recited before beginning an uninterrupted period of slaughtering; as long as the shochet does not have a lengthy pause, interrupt, or otherwise lose concentration, this blessing covers all the animals slaughtered in that period. This blessing follows the standard form for a blessing before most Jewish rituals ("Blessèd are you God ... who commanded us regarding [such-and-such]", in this case, Shechita). The general rule in Judaism is that for rituals which have an associated blessing, if one omitted the blessing, the ritual is still valid [see Maimonides Laws of Blessings 11:5]; as such, even if the shochet failed to recite the blessing before Shechita, the slaughter is still valid and the meat is kosher.[18]
    I'm guessing this means that whatever is recited is recited at different times during the slaughter
    Oh okay, I get it.

    "Though the slaughtering is the same, Jews, who follow kosher, do not pronounce the name of God on each animal they slaughter. They think that it is wasteful to utter the name of god out of context. They only perform prayers on the first and last animal that they slaughter. Muslims who follow halal rituals always pronounce the name of God on each animal that is slaughtered." (http://www.differencebetween.net/mis...her-and-halal/)
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    (Original post by fire_and_ice)
    Oh okay, I get it.

    "Though the slaughtering is the same, Jews, who follow kosher, do not pronounce the name of God on each animal they slaughter. They think that it is wasteful to utter the name of god out of context. They only perform prayers on the first and last animal that they slaughter. Muslims who follow halal rituals always pronounce the name of God on each animal that is slaughtered." (http://www.differencebetween.net/mis...her-and-halal/)
    thanx for this link, the ones I found were so damn confusing
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    (Original post by fire_and_ice)
    Do you know why this might be? Because Halal and Kosher pretty much use the same method of slaughtering (a single incision with a sharp knife which immedietly causes unconsciousness) and the blessing with prayer. Essentially, the prayer would be directed to the same God.
    The main point is that slaughtering of animal should be done by special rabbi, who knows all strict kosher requirements. There is even special requirement regarding the length of the knife..
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    (Original post by Anonymous1502)
    Let's face it,it is very hard to purchase meat which was slaughtered in a kosher way I never saw kosher meat being sold in any of the large chain supermarkets I know it is sold in areas where there are large Jewish communities however if you move to Singapore or a country where there are nearly any Jews then there will be no kosher meat.If you did not eat meat and diary together and did the other things to keep kosher but ate meat that is not slaughtered in a kosher way would it still be ok or is there no point if your meat is not kosher?
    Don't the Kosher rules get weirdly strict? Like you can't cook using utensils that have prepared non-kosher food and things like that.

    How does the Kosher method compare to Halal?
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    (Original post by admonit)
    The main point is that slaughtering of animal should be done by special rabbi, who knows all strict kosher requirements. There is even special requirement regarding the length of the knife..
    The person who does [i]Scheittah [/i{sp}- ritual kosher slaughter is called the Schoet and no he does not have to be a Rabbi or have Semicah(rabbinical ordination) on him to do Scheittah just to know well the Halachot well in regards to Scheittah
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    (Original post by Matthew12)
    The person who does [i]Scheittah [/i{sp}- ritual kosher slaughter is called the Schoet and no he does not have to be a Rabbi or have Semicah(rabbinical ordination) on him to do Scheittah just to know well the Halachot well in regards to Scheittah
    Thank you for your correction.
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    Not Jewish but as a Muslim who has listened to Jewish speakers on the rare occasion, I have found they generally agree that the Muslims are the decendents of Ismael son of Abraham (peace on them both), and therefore the God of Islam is the same as the God of Judaism. From this angle, although the Jews do not follow Islam, I would disregard those reformist Jews who argue that Halal meat is not permissible for Jews, and I would say that Halal meat is permissible for Jews (from this perspective) so long as there were no other conflicts with kosher rules...
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    (Original post by Ghazali)
    Not Jewish but as a Muslim who has listened to Jewish speakers on the rare occasion, I have found they generally agree that the Muslims are the decendents of Ismael son of Abraham (peace on them both), and therefore the God of Islam is the same as the God of Judaism. From this angle, although the Jews do not follow Islam, I would disregard those reformist Jews who argue that Halal meat is not permissible for Jews, and I would say that Halal meat is permissible for Jews (from this perspective) so long as there were no other conflicts with kosher rules...



    Halal meat cannot be Mutar(permissible) because it would be considered Nevillah - food which has not gone under Kosher jewish slaughter which is Assur(forbidden) for jews to eat. It does not matter that both Judaism and Islam are Abrahamic religions
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    (Original post by Matthew12)
    [/b]


    Halal meat cannot be Mutar(permissible) because it would be considered Nevillah - food which has not gone under Kosher jewish slaughter which is Assur(forbidden) for jews to eat. It does not matter that both Judaism and Islam are Abrahamic religions
    Is the process of slaughter not the same, apart from obviously the language of the prayer?
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    (Original post by Ghazali)
    Is the process of slaughter not the same, apart from obviously the language of the prayer?
    no and the fact that it's a non jew doing is enough to make the meat non-kosher
 
 
 
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