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TSRian geeks! are u smarter than a British 13 year old? Watch

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    I attempted all of them but am only confident with 7 of them. I left school at 15 having done very little maths for years even at that point so I'm calling this a victory :lol:
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Thanks to @Zacken the answers are
    Spoiler:
    Show
    4086
    10/11
    36
    D
    11
    1
    6
    336
    36
    1/13
    9/10 I think. I got number 9 wrong. How would I go about working it out correctly?
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    9/10 I think. I got number 9 wrong. How would I go about working it out correctly?
    For 9, the speed of the escalator and her walking speed are additive. Using the info provided, you can work out her walking speed alone and the speed of the escalator alone (i.e. when she is not moving). Then you can add the two together to get the total speed walking + escalator and hence work out the time taken.

    To do this, you might want to take an arbitrary length of the escalator (perhaps one which divides easily with the numbers)
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    (Original post by Student403)
    For 9, the speed of the escalator and her walking speed are additive. Using the info provided, you can work out her walking speed alone and the speed of the escalator alone (i.e. when she is not moving). Then you can add the two together to get the total speed walking + escalator and hence work out the time taken.

    To do this, you might want to take an arbitrary length of the escalator (perhaps one which divides easily with the numbers)
    I see, thanks. I think I tried to do something similar to that but messed it up :facepalm:

    If I had looked at it for a few minutes I may have got there.

    At least I got the others :lol:

    I'm only slightly worse at maths than 13 year olds :lol:
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    I see, thanks. I think I tried to do something similar to that but messed it up :facepalm:

    If I had looked at it for a few minutes I may have got there.

    At least I got the others :lol:

    I'm only slightly worse at maths than 13 year olds :lol:
    Well done!

    Trust me, you are way smarter than 13 year olds Most wouldn't get near all of these
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    that was easy except q6 which was a dumb question and idk what it meant
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    (Original post by sandvika)
    that was easy except q6 which was a dumb question and idk what it meant
    It wasn't dumb at all and it was quite frankly was one of the most interesting problem on that paper. It uses a very cool concept.
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Well done!

    Trust me, you are way smarter than 13 year olds Most wouldn't get near all of these
    Good to know :lol:

    Is the natural progression usually JMC > SMC > BMO > IMO?

    I think I remember doing tests somewhat like this in primary school many years ago and getting the highest score in my school but I have no idea if it was just something my school had us sit for fun :dontknow:

    It was probably just an arithmetic test that my memory has decided was something else :lol: :facepalm2:
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    Good to know :lol:

    Is the natural progression usually JMC > SMC > BMO > IMO?

    I think I remember doing tests somewhat like this in primary school many years ago and getting the highest score in my school but I have no idea if it was just something my school had us sit for fun :dontknow:

    It was probably just an arithmetic test that my memory has decided was something else :lol: :facepalm2:
    Progression is usually JMC > IMC (this) > SMC

    JMC/IMC have their own progression olympiad rounds. But senior goes

    SMC > BMO1 > BMO2 > Trinity Camp > IMO team (Zacken pls confirm)
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    It wasn't dumb at all and it was quite frankly was one of the most interesting problem on that paper. It uses a very cool concept.
    I brute forced it :facepalm2:
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Progression is usually JMC > IMC (this) > SMC

    JMC/IMC have their own progression olympiad rounds. But senior goes

    SMC > BMO1 > BMO2 > Trinity Camp > IMO team (Zacken pls confirm)
    Daniel Lightwing has a TSR account so we could ask him
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    (Original post by Student403)
    SMC > BMO1 > BMO2 > Trinity Camp > IMO team (Zacken pls confirm)
    AFAIK, yeah, that's entirely correct. But I'm not exactly an expert. I've never been in a maths competition before!

    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    I brute forced it :facepalm2:
    Look at the prime factorisation of 24 = 2^3 \times 3, that should make the answer very clear. Especially the 2^3 part.
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    Daniel Lightwing has a TSR account so we could ask him
    Really? :O Wonder if he uses it
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    AFAIK, yeah, that's entirely correct. But I'm not exactly an expert. I've never been in a maths competition before!



    Look at the prime factorisation of 24 = 2^3 \times 3, that should make the answer very clear. Especially the 2^3 part.
    I believe I understand now, but when I answered it I didn't so I just did the calculations.

    (Original post by Student403)
    Really? :O Wonder if he uses it
    I don't think he does, I certainly haven't seen him post for a number of years.
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    I remember doing these at school.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    It wasn't dumb at all and it was quite frankly was one of the most interesting problem on that paper. It uses a very cool concept.
    Did we get the same q6? I got How many of the above positive integers are divisible by 24? Did it mean products or was it a nonsense question?
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    (Original post by sandvika)
    Did we get the same q6? I got How many of the above positive integers are divisible by 24? Did it mean products or was it a nonsense question?
    They are positive integers in the form of products of prime factors.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    So, for Q6: you know that 24 = 2 \times 2 \times 2 \times 3 = 2^3 \times 3, does that help in anyway?

    That is, you need the number to have 2^3 \times 3 as part of it's prime factorisation, how many numbers in the list has that?
    None of them? :eek3: Or number 4 because it has 2^3 \times 3 plus some extra?
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    None of them? :eek3: Or number 4 because it has 2^3 \times 3 plus some extra?
    number 4 Because remember it can be divisible so long as the quotient is whole (which in that case it is)
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    (Original post by Student403)
    number 4 Because remember it can be divisible so long as the quotient is whole (which in that case it is)
    How do you know this? :holmes: Is that just a rule you have to know?
 
 
 
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