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    Hello TSR community,

    Just wanna ask about the levels of proficiency needed in order to take on a Masters in Finance, or specifically, Finance paired with Risk Management.

    The highest Maths qualification that I have is actually A Levels Maths (A2). Although my current course (Accounting and Finance) only provides minimum units on Mathematics, I can take Mathematics units if I'm keen as they are offered to other courses in my University.
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    I think it depends on where you want to apply. A quick google tells me that LSE says the maths needed is basic so are happy with an A level but Imperial desire a more mathematical degree. Bath too seem to want you to have a STEM degree. If I were you, I would decide on universities you may wish to target and send them an email asking for guidance as they will have access to the most up to date knowledge.
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    (Original post by M1c)
    Hello TSR community,

    Just wanna ask about the levels of proficiency needed in order to take on a Masters in Finance, or specifically, Finance paired with Risk Management.

    The highest Maths qualification that I have is actually A Levels Maths (A2). Although my current course (Accounting and Finance) only provides minimum units on Mathematics, I can take Mathematics units if I'm keen as they are offered to other courses in my University.
    What university do you study at? I have already needed to go beyond my A-level content in maths for the first year and even more so during second year (of acc&fin degree) so would not be surprised if Masters would require a high level of proficiency in maths.
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    (Original post by aliman65)
    What university do you study at? I have already needed to go beyond my A-level content in maths for the first year and even more so during second year (of acc&fin degree) so would not be surprised if Masters would require a high level of proficiency in maths.
    I'm from Malaysia actually but I'm kinda keen to spend my year at the UK after my degree, just for the exposure.

    My current course is getting validated by Lancaster University in the UK. A quick search shows that our modules are quite the same, just that because it is a Malaysian University, they placed in some of the more "Malaysian" units into the course (Malaysian Law/Tax etc, AND THEY TOOK OUT INFORMATION SYSTEMS).

    Judging by the modules it is tending towards Accounting more than a Finance degree, like a Accounting major and Finance minor. The only Maths module I know is Business Statistics, which is a year 1 unit, involves a combination of Statistics chapters from Maths and Further Maths in A Levels and something beyond it.

    Sorry for the late reply though, been busy with assignments and exams
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    I think it depends on where you want to apply. A quick google tells me that LSE says the maths needed is basic so are happy with an A level but Imperial desire a more mathematical degree. Bath too seem to want you to have a STEM degree. If I were you, I would decide on universities you may wish to target and send them an email asking for guidance as they will have access to the most up to date knowledge.
    LSE looks promising to me after some research. Kinda love the units that they are offering.

    Going to Imperial means either getting the general Finance module or the MFE, which requires programming skills and high level Maths for the latter. Difference in fees are extremely big as well compared to LSE in the perspective of an international student (I'm from Malaysia btw).

    Haven't do much research on Bath, will do so later on.

    Sorry for the late reply though, been busy with assignments and exams.
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    I think that's fine, you honestly won't need much maths. I don't think you do much stochastic calculus in a Masters in Finance which is the most difficult math topic in finance. If you get an offer then maybe it would be best to brush up on some partial derivatives, constrained optimisation and linear algebra but nothing you can't learn in the summer. You will do econometrics in a masters in Finance, so your linear algebra has to be good but nothing you can't learn from textbooks and YouTube and other online sources.
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    (Original post by stochasticking)
    I think that's fine, you honestly won't need much maths. I don't think you do much stochastic calculus in a Masters in Finance which is the most difficult math topic in finance. If you get an offer then maybe it would be best to brush up on some partial derivatives, constrained optimisation and linear algebra but nothing you can't learn in the summer. You will do econometrics in a masters in Finance, so your linear algebra has to be good but nothing you can't learn from textbooks and YouTube and other online sources.
    I'm starting from the very basic now so that I can have a strong foundation to whatever I'm going to face later on. Enrolled into Coursera's self-paced learning calculus courses cause I'm having a sem break now (while watching the Dota majors hehe).

    Gotta self-learn some programming next sem break

    Thanks for the insight mate
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    (Original post by M1c)
    I'm starting from the very basic now so that I can have a strong foundation to whatever I'm going to face later on. Enrolled into Coursera's self-paced learning calculus courses cause I'm having a sem break now (while watching the Dota majors hehe).

    Gotta self-learn some programming next sem break

    Thanks for the insight mate
    That's a great idea! That's good and the programming will be very useful. The textbook I'd recommend is Mathematics For Economists by Renshaw, any edition, it's really good. Takes you from the basics to advanced calculus.
 
 
 
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