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    Hello, I am currently studying mechanical engineering locally at my college, but have got a conditional offer for Glasgow university to study ''mechanical engineering with aeronautics'' year one entry in sept 2016. My question is if there is anyone else out there who has done this course, or a similar one and if you know of the likelihood of gaining employment in the aviation industry after a degree which isn't solely aeronautical based. Any more feedback concerning the subject/subject field would also be greatly appreciated.. thanks!
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    (Original post by cmart1)
    Hello, I am currently studying mechanical engineering locally at my college, but have got a conditional offer for Glasgow university to study ''mechanical engineering with aeronautics'' year one entry in sept 2016. My question is if there is anyone else out there who has done this course, or a similar one and if you know of the likelihood of gaining employment in the aviation industry after a degree which isn't solely aeronautical based. Any more feedback concerning the subject/subject field would also be greatly appreciated.. thanks!
    Hey there!

    Glad to hear you're interested in coming to Glasgow! It's a great university and has a very good Mechanical and Aerospace department. I am currently in my 4th year of Aeronautical Engineering, and know and work with many Mech with Aero students.

    Do note that just because you're doing a specific degree, it doesn't mean you can't go into a variety of sectors. For example, aerospace companies will accept students from all backgrounds; Electrical, Aero, Mechanical, Physics, Maths, etc. What may change is the type of work you're interested in. Those who do Mech with Aero at Glasgow do have a few electives which are specific to aircraft and spacecraft, but not in the same capacity as those doing aeronautical.

    Mech with Aero, alongside us in Aeronautical, have a 4th year project which works closely with BAE Systems. We also get plenty of internship opportunities at aviation and defense companies, such as Jaguar Landrover, MBDA, Airbus, Rolls Royce, and so on.

    If you have any other questions the please let us know!

    Scott
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    Honestly you're better off doing a mechanical degree than an aerospace degree for getting into the aviation industry, there are more jobs available there for mechanical grads than aerospace grads.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    there are more jobs available there for mechanical grads than aerospace grads.
    such as
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    such as
    Well look at pretty much all jobs which will accept aerospace grads, they'll also accept mechanical grads, and then you've got work in propulsion and manufacturing which both have a definite preference for mech grads.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    Well look at pretty much all jobs which will accept aerospace grads, they'll also accept mechanical grads, and then you've got work in propulsion and manufacturing which both have a definite preference for mech grads.
    I dont see why an aero engineer wont be suited for a job in propulsion, at my uni to be specific we take both a compulsory propulsion module and more thermodynamics in 3rd year which mech people dont do (Although I personally have no interest in propulsion). Also aero engineers (and electrical) are better suited for higher level systems/control design such as planes/rockets/missiles/satellites etc than mechanical engineers. so when it comes to physically building parts, yes mech but if you wanna make the thing fly, its aero

    but of course with a experience anyone can get into any job, but i'm talking about the average mech and aero engineer
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    I dont see why an aero engineer wont be suited for a job in propulsion, at my uni to be specific we take both a compulsory propulsion module and more thermodynamics in 3rd year which mech people dont do (Although I personally have no interest in propulsion). Also aero engineers (and electrical) are better suited for higher level systems/control design such as planes/rockets/missiles/satellites etc than mechanical engineers. so when it comes to physically building parts, yes mech but if you wanna make the thing fly, its aero

    but of course with a experience anyone can get into any job, but i'm talking about the average mech and aero engineer
    I agree, there shouldn't be a difference as aero engineers end up learning similar content if not more due to the broader areas of study and the expectation to keep up with the other engineers, but employers don't have a particularly good idea of what's involved in an aero degree and that means finding a job is a bit harder.
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    Thanks for the replies. I feel that an aero engineer should have a slight advantage in the aero sector due to aerodynamics/propulsion modules but as it has been said this may not be recognised within the industry. I can't see how a purely mechanical engineer would have an advantage here if they have equal other credentials. I feel that if you're very much looking for an aero job at the end of it then there shouldn't be a disadvantage in that degree. Any comments welcome.


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    (Original post by cmart1)
    Thanks for the replies. I feel that an aero engineer should have a slight advantage in the aero sector due to aerodynamics/propulsion modules but as it has been said this may not be recognised within the industry. I can't see how a purely mechanical engineer would have an advantage here if they have equal other credentials. I feel that if you're very much looking for an aero job at the end of it then there shouldn't be a disadvantage in that degree. Any comments welcome.


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    I dont fully understand your comment but an aerospace engineer does not have a 'slight' advantage in the aerospace sector, some jobs are just simply meant for aerospace engineers. There are mechanical engineers in aerospace companies but they do different jobs, such as working on rocket engine or maybe building the plane, rocket, etc after it has actually been desined but if you want to actually be part of the process or team that design things that fly, be an aerospace engineer. Aerospace engineers learn far more in depth in control systems, electronics, aerodynamics and aircraft design so they dont have a 'slight' advantage, they will just simply get hired. [with right qualifications + experience]
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    There are plenty of job adverts which don't specify solely aerospace qualifications. A mechanical engineer doesn't have to be part of the manufacturing process, they can design components and form part of a team within an aerospace project.


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    (Original post by cmart1)
    There are plenty of job adverts which don't specify solely aerospace qualifications. A mechanical engineer doesn't have to be part of the manufacturing process, they can design components and form part of a team within an aerospace project.


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    Thats because you're not looking for a job in the aerospace sector, also uk doesnt do much aerospace.

    Also yes maybe before when there were only 11,000 aerospace engineers in the world you will see a lot of people with mechanical degrees in jobs that seem to be aerospace but now a lot of people are doing aerospace so whoever is relevant will get hired for the job, which in the aero industry is a no brainer.

    Edit:

    Also let me add, a mechanical engineer (or any other engineering for that matter) isnt automatically ready to work in any company they want doing any role because 'mechanical engineering is broad'. If you are a mechanical engineer wanting to go into aerospace, either 1. You choose some aero modules whilst you're at uni, do a masters project related to aerospace, aero related phd or get a job in an aero company working your way up. Someone with an aero degree wont have to go through all that, they could be working on real projects after a year or 2 because they actually know stuff
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    Thats because you're not looking for a job in the aerospace sector, also uk doesnt do much aerospace.

    Also yes maybe before when there were only 11,000 aerospace engineers in the world you will see a lot of people with mechanical degrees in jobs that seem to be aerospace but now a lot of people are doing aerospace so whoever is relevant will get hired for the job, which in the aero industry is a no brainer.

    Edit:

    Also let me add, a mechanical engineer (or any other engineering for that matter) isnt automatically ready to work in any company they want doing any role because 'mechanical engineering is broad'. If you are a mechanical engineer wanting to go into aerospace, either 1. You choose some aero modules whilst you're at uni, do a masters project related to aerospace, aero related phd or get a job in an aero company working your way up. Someone with an aero degree wont have to go through all that, they could be working on real projects after a year or 2 because they actually know stuff
    Honestly you don't really know what you're talking about. The UK has one of the biggest aerospace industries in the world, 17% of the global market, which is absolutely unprecedented with the only country in a similar situation relative to population being France.

    Why would a company hire an aerospace engineering graduate who has a broad background but doesn't master it as well over a mechanical engineering graduate or a EEE graduate who has a more specialised and useful skillset? At university you should be (and are) taught how to apply your knowledge generally, so even if you have done work in the context of planes it doesn't make a whole lot of difference.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    Why would a company hire an aerospace engineering graduate who has a broad background but doesn't master it as well over a mechanical engineering graduate or a EEE graduate who has a more specialised and useful skillset? At university you should be (and are) taught how to apply your knowledge generally, so even if you have done work in the context of planes it doesn't make a whole lot of difference.
    wait so now mechanical and EEE is more specialised in aerospace engineering?

    editt: i was in the middle of LoL

    but who said aerospace engineers dont specialise? Why is it called aerospace and not mech then looool. What are the extra compulsory modules in aerodynamics, aircraft design and control for? Whats the masters degree for? If anything in aero you get more 'useful' skillset as in mechanical engineering you could in theory pick quite easy and even non-engineering modules. you dont get that in aero. What you're saying is just as invalid I could also say you dont know what you're talking about.

    at the end of the day depending on hardwork and experience, anyone can get into any field. end of argument
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    wait so now mechanical and EEE is more specialised in aerospace engineering?

    editt: i was in the middle of LoL

    but who said aerospace engineers dont specialise? Why is it called aerospace and not mech then looool. What are the extra compulsory modules in aerodynamics, aircraft design and control for? Whats the masters degree for? If anything in aero you get more 'useful' skillset as in mechanical engineering you could in theory pick quite easy and even non-engineering modules. you dont get that in aero. What you're saying is just as invalid I could also say you dont know what you're talking about.

    at the end of the day depending on hardwork, anyone can get into any field. end of argument
    How far are you into your aerospace engineering degree? I've had 3 years on my course so far, I go to what I'd like to think is a respected engineering school, my personal tutors have been leaders in their field and I've met and talked with quite a few people involved in industry alongside having many friends who have gone above and beyond what I've done. Honestly I don't know why it's called aerospace, probably because it's a more succinct name than Electrical, Mechanical and Materials engineering. Have you studied those modules? It's not aerodynamics, it's fluid dynamics in the context of air. It's not aircraft design, it's vehicle design in the context of aircraft. The difference between an aero module and a similar mech module is maybe two lectures if you're lucky.

    The masters degree is pretty much a requirement for every engineering field, that's like asking what's the 3rd year of my chemistry degree for? The only time I've seen a mech degree offer non-engineering modules was when a year abroad was offered and then the idea was you'd catch up with the content during that year. And as for picking easier modules you can do that in some aero degrees too.

    No, no they can't. Quite a few companies contact our department to tell them that they don't want aerospace students, we all got an email about it. It's a nice thought but realistically you're going to have to do a separate masters if you want into another field.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    How far are you into your aerospace engineering degree? I've had 3 years on my course so far, I go to what I'd like to think is a respected engineering school, my personal tutors have been leaders in their field and I've met and talked with quite a few people involved in industry alongside having many friends who have gone above and beyond what I've done. Honestly I don't know why it's called aerospace, probably because it's a more succinct name than Electrical, Mechanical and Materials engineering. Have you studied those modules? It's not aerodynamics, it's fluid dynamics in the context of air. It's not aircraft design, it's vehicle design in the context of aircraft. The difference between an aero module and a similar mech module is maybe two lectures if you're lucky.


    No, no they can't. Quite a few companies contact our department to tell them that they don't want aerospace students, we all got an email about it. It's a nice thought but realistically you're going to have to do a separate masters if you want into another field.
    not sure if I should take you serious anymore because you're talking like you have no idea what aerospace is. saying stuff like 'its vehicle design in context of aircraft' like aeroplanes and rockets are 3d printers that anyone with an engineering degree can make. 'The difference between an aero module and a similar mech module is maybe two lectures if you're lucky' Thats at your uni then, because at my uni mechanical engineers dont take flight mechanics, aeronautics/orbital mechanics, advanced control systems, and many more I dont need to mention. I'm first year I take a flight mechanics module, mechanical engineers at my uni dont, hence they will never have the exact same knowledge about aircrafts as I and my fellow aero students do now, same in 2nd and 3rd year, in the end, I will be more qualified for jobs in the aero industry than someone who took mech. Also if employers are telling your uni they dont want aerospace students then thats your aerospace departments fault so dont generalise.


    I'm not the best person to be having this debate with, just go on reddit
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    Also aero engineers (and electrical) are better suited for higher level systems/control design such as planes/rockets/missiles/satellites etc than mechanical engineers
    chinny reckon
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    chinny reckon
    go on youtube, find the best channels that teach control theory, I'll bet any amount they studied aerospace. Lars Blackmore, he was in 'Times under 30' for his great work he's done, wrote a lot of control algorithms including coinventing GFold for NASA. he did a general engineering degree at cambridge and did a phd in control with focus in aerospace applications. Control theory get x10 harder when you are applying to situations such as in stochastic systems which examples include aircrafts/rockets/etc. Hence why I'm saying an aero degree does better in control because you will always be applying and designing controllers for hard core unpredictable systems. Of course not all aerospace graduates will come out with the best knowledge in control, likewise you will also get people in mech who are pretty good in control, but on average aero control is harder. I personally wanna work in control after uni and I am currently working with 3rd year electrical and mechanical engineers as well as with phd students in a project and so far on the electrical engineers seem to have more knowledge of control, because they do it more.
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    go on youtube, find the best channels that teach control theory, I'll bet any amount they studied aerospace. Lars Blackmore, he was in 'Times under 30' for his great work he's done, wrote a lot of control algorithms including coinventing GFold for NASA. he did a general engineering degree at cambridge and did a phd in control with focus in aerospace applications. Control theory get x10 harder when you are applying to situations such as in stochastic systems which examples include aircrafts/rockets/etc. Hence why I'm saying an aero degree does better in control because you will always be applying and designing controllers for hard core unpredictable systems. Of course not all aerospace graduates will come out with the best knowledge in control, likewise you will also get people in mech who are pretty good in control, but on average aero control is harder.
    I don't know how you can state these things to be true, based on what? If I still had institutional access I could easily look for a control journal and see whether contributors work in aero or mechanical, or initially studied aero or mechanical, but I don't think this is important, and I cannot accept these claims. As people find their niche and start making new contributions to the field they can move in all kinds of directions, so what they initially studied, as long as they have some experience with control, can't possibly be of great importance.

    Many, many systems will be 'stochastic', not just aircraft. That's kind of the point of control, to bring stability to uncertain (I can't bring myself to say unpredictable because Model Predictive Control exists ) systems, or rather to control them in a stable manner.

    I personally wanna work in control after uni and I am currently working with 3rd year electrical and mechanical engineers as well as with phd students in a project and so far on the electrical engineers seem to have more knowledge of control, because they do it more.
    That's cool, but what do you do?
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    I don't know how you can state these things to be true, based on what? If I still had institutional access I could easily look for a control journal and see whether contributors work in aero or mechanical, or initially studied aero or mechanical, but I don't think this is important, and I cannot accept these claims. As people find their niche and start making new contributions to the field they can move in all kinds of directions, so what they initially studied, as long as they have some experience with control, can't possibly be of great importance.
    Thats my observation so far, also this is an opinion, not a fact. but of course like I said not everyone from an aero degree will become a control expert or necessarily be better than mech but the course will teach you more advanced control methods than in a mech degree. At my uni after second year, control modules are optional for mech where as aero still have compulsory control so unless someone in mech is super keen on control and decide to take them as optional they probably wouldnt touch it.


    Many, many systems will be 'stochastic', not just aircraft. That's kind of the point of control, to bring stability to uncertain (I can't bring myself to say unpredictable because Model Predictive Control exists ) systems, or rather to control them in a stable manner.

    Give me an example of an application of real world control that is on parr with space x rocket landing or autopilots in planes that is non aerospace based.


    That's cool, but what do you do?
    We are making an autonomous sailing robot for this international competition. so the sail has to move from point A to B as one of the goals but unlike powered boats which will just be a straight line, sailing required a bit more maneuverings against wind etc (im not a sailer so dont know much ). We're using the robot operating system heavily for the computation stuff. So I'm in the 'lowlevel' team (we also have 'high level' team), so high level does all the hardware stuff and mission objectives, so they use some path planning algorithm to say they wanna head east or in certain direction, this information will then be sent to my team (lowlevel) where based on information such as wind speed, current heading, orientation, etc, we use some controllers to work out the rudder angle and sailing angle to head in desired direction. We have currently implemented a PID controller for the rudder, will probably use PID for the sail as well for tacking. Some people have suggested to use LQT and Model Predictive but I think they where just shouting out whatever control method they've heard of. I mean we will try other methods if PID fails. The less mathematical modelling we have to do, the better. I really want to try out a Fuzzy Logic controller though because given sailing is something humans have experience off, creating membership functions for a FL controller shouldn't be hard. However I seem to be the only one enthusiastic about it in the team so its not on our priority list right now.
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    but the course will teach you more advanced control methods than in a mech degree. At my uni after second year, control modules are optional for mech where as aero still have compulsory control so unless someone in mech is super keen on control and decide to take them as optional they probably wouldnt touch it.
    Still not sure how you've reached this conclusion.

    I'm surprised by this - that students get options so early (compared to me!) and that control is not compulsory for mechanicals - but this only informs me of the decision of one university. I can't infer that because of this aeros 'generally' will be more adept at control than mechanicals.

    Give me an example of an application of real world control that is on par with space x rocket landing or autopilots in planes that is non aerospace based.
    What exactly am I supposed to be comparing? The majority of control schemes used in aero projects will also find a home in underwater vehicles (I thought I'd found a good paper but I can't retrieve it, but I will say that a submarine has just as many degrees of freedom as a plane...), so I don't think one can say that aerospace has some kind of monopoly on the most complex or 'interesting' control methods. However, it is also likely that those working with flying things will be quite productive in terms of new developments - applying existing schemes in new ways, or solving problems that at this point are only relevant to those in the field, autopilot is a nice example - as it's a really good time for those working in space exploration and autonomous vehicles.

    Incidentally, I found a paper about G-FOLD and it seems at least one, possibly two of the four authors have a mechanical background.

    *snip*
    okay, so you're setting up a PID controller. All right.
 
 
 
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