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International student for Law. Job/visa opportunities? watch

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    Hi.So basically I'm from India. Did IGCSE and A levels.I've applied to colleges in 4 different countries (USA, UK, Australia and India).I'm on a gap year currently.So I really want to do law and I know the UK has some top colleges.I've already received an offer from Leicester and waiting to hear back from 4 other colleges.Now, what I want to know about is the graduate prospects and visa situation for international students studying in the UK (specifically Indian students if you have the info, or if not, nvm, just international students will do).I know that the UK is cracking down on immigration and I know they recently passed a bill saying that international students have to return immediately to their home country after studying, but I've also seen reports suggesting that this is not the case and work permits are available to students.Now what exactly is the visa situation there? Can international students stay there and get work permits for a few years at least? And do law firms actually hire people from outside their own country? Sorry I sound uninformed, but I have tried doing research and all I could find were contradictory reports.
    I will be speaking to a few people who're friends of mine and either studied in the UK or are living there, but I would like to get a basic idea at least before I talk to them.Any response will be of great help.
    Thank you for taking the time to read this
    And thank you for your response.
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    (Original post by pinkisthefloyd)
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    They passed a bill about international students but it's not yet enforced. Don't worry.
    Use the website https://www.gov.uk/tier-4-general-visa to find out more.

    This also might be useful -> http://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Internation...-your-studies/
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    (Original post by brent_)
    They passed a bill about international students but it's not yet enforced. Don't worry.
    Use the website https://www.gov.uk/tier-4-general-visa to find out more.

    This also might be useful -> http://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Internation...-your-studies/
    The website talks about a visa for international students for studying.
    I am not bothered about a student visa at all. I want to know about getting a visa after completing my studies there.
    Thanks for your response
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    (Original post by pinkisthefloyd)
    The website talks about a visa for international students for studying.
    I am not bothered about a student visa at all. I want to know about getting a visa after completing my studies there.
    Thanks for your response
    Understood. Consider the second link I posted above? I'd consider switching to Tier 2 after your studies.
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    Apologies. I didn't see the second link before.
    That does look good. However, it also says in the bottom that some of these schemes require the student to return to his homeland and apply for the visa from there. Do you have any idea if that is true for Tier 2 visa?
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    (Original post by pinkisthefloyd)
    Apologies. I didn't see the second link before.
    That does look good. However, it also says in the bottom that some of these schemes require the student to return to his homeland and apply for the visa from there. Do you have any idea if that is true for Tier 2 visa?

    They only said that because they don't want to guarantee immediate success from someone switching from Tier 4 to Tier 2. Before the Tier 4 expires there should be a window where you will apply for Tier 2. Just allow extra time in applying for your Tier 2. Based on my judgment, they'll only ask the student to return to his homeland when the Tier 4 expires and then apply Tier 2 from there. I would advice looking/researching about law firms who are licensed for Tier 2 sponsorship.
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    1) There are only a number of firms who have the certificate of sponsorship to award tier 2 visas. They tend to be the more international firms paying higher salaries.

    2) Even those firms that do have the ability to award visas, might choose to reserve theirs for more senior lawyers/staff rather than trainees.

    It is possible to be employed and get a firm to support you with a tier 2 visa but it is an incredibly competitive market. Firms have to prove that they couldn't have recruited from within the EU first. Many firms do not have the ability to prove this, even if they do have the certificate of sponsorship. However, if a firm has got these processes in place, it is relatively easy.

    Candidates do sometimes have to return home to obtain their visa. This particularly happens with candidates who finish their course (LPC post graduation) in the May/June but their training contract doesn't start until the following February/March. This isn't an issue for the firms, the main issue is the cost to the candidate of having to fly home and then fly back though.

    The main challenge for candidates is securing a training contract in the first place, rather than the visa. They will have limited opportunities available to them, as they are limited by the firms that can sponsor Tier 2s. They then have to compete not only with domestic and EU students for those roles, but also all the international students also applying for those TCs. It is a competitive job market and therefore many international students find themselves having to go home once their tier 4 is up as they have failed to secure tier 2 sponsored work.
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    (Original post by brent_)
    They only said that because they don't want to guarantee immediate success from someone switching from Tier 4 to Tier 2. Before the Tier 4 expires there should be a window where you will apply for Tier 2. Just allow extra time in applying for your Tier 2. Based on my judgment, they'll only ask the student to return to his homeland when the Tier 4 expires and then apply Tier 2 from there. I would advice looking/researching about law firms who are licensed for Tier 2 sponsorship.
    Ahhh ok. So the law firms can sponsor your Tier 2 visa.
    I'll look more into it.
    Thanks a lot you've been very helpful
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    1) There are only a number of firms who have the certificate of sponsorship to award tier 2 visas. They tend to be the more international firms paying higher salaries.

    2) Even those firms that do have the ability to award visas, might choose to reserve theirs for more senior lawyers/staff rather than trainees.

    It is possible to be employed and get a firm to support you with a tier 2 visa but it is an incredibly competitive market. Firms have to prove that they couldn't have recruited from within the EU first. Many firms do not have the ability to prove this, even if they do have the certificate of sponsorship. However, if a firm has got these processes in place, it is relatively easy.

    Candidates do sometimes have to return home to obtain their visa. This particularly happens with candidates who finish their course (LPC post graduation) in the May/June but their training contract doesn't start until the following February/March. This isn't an issue for the firms, the main issue is the cost to the candidate of having to fly home and then fly back though.

    The main challenge for candidates is securing a training contract in the first place, rather than the visa. They will have limited opportunities available to them, as they are limited by the firms that can sponsor Tier 2s. They then have to compete not only with domestic and EU students for those roles, but also all the international students also applying for those TCs. It is a competitive job market and therefore many international students find themselves having to go home once their tier 4 is up as they have failed to secure tier 2 sponsored work.
    Bear with me if I sound uninformed, but I just want to make sure what the process is.
    So you finish your UG degree, you get a training contract for a limited period of time, and then you write the BAR exam, after which you get a job in a company right? Is that how it works in the UK?
    So if I get a training contract, does that mean I will be employed by the same company and thus I can get a visa? Or do I have to apply for a Tier 2 visa again after finishing my training contract?
    And is there any website/any place that I can go to to find information on which law firms can sponsor Tier 2 visas?
    Also, I'm assuming that you're in the field of Law. Would a student from a university like Leicester or Lancaster be considered for the positions you're talking about in Tier-2 sponsored firms? I know that they're pretty good universities in the rankings, but I also know they're not top 5 or top 10. And as you said previously, it is highly competitive.
    Thanks a lot for your response. Highly appreciated
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    (Original post by pinkisthefloyd)
    Ahhh ok. So the law firms can sponsor your Tier 2 visa.
    I'll look more into it.
    Thanks a lot you've been very helpful
    Some can - not all. They have to have the ability to apply for them.

    A very long list of employers can be found here - https://www.gov.uk/government/public...onsors-workers

    A lot of firms are not listed, and as I stressed even those that are might choose not to apply for visas for trainees, instead choosing to only apply for more senior/niche/specialist roles.
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    (Original post by pinkisthefloyd)
    Bear with me if I sound uninformed, but I just want to make sure what the process is.
    So you finish your UG degree, you get a training contract for a limited period of time, and then you write the BAR exam, after which you get a job in a company right? Is that how it works in the UK?
    So if I get a training contract, does that mean I will be employed by the same company and thus I can get a visa? Or do I have to apply for a Tier 2 visa again after finishing my training contract?
    And is there any website/any place that I can go to to find information on which law firms can sponsor Tier 2 visas?
    Also, I'm assuming that you're in the field of Law. Would a student from a university like Leicester or Lancaster be considered for the positions you're talking about in Tier-2 sponsored firms? I know that they're pretty good universities in the rankings, but I also know they're not top 5 or top 10. And as you said previously, it is highly competitive.
    Thanks a lot for your response. Highly appreciated
    Not as it stands.... for the time being it is the following:

    You do your LLB at undergraduate level.

    Then you do the Legal Practice Course. This is a 6-9 month course that you have to complete before starting a training contract. You would get another tier 4 visa to cover you during this period of time.

    At the moment there isn't a bar exam. This might change, as it is currently being reviewed as to whether something like the New York Bar would replace the LPC. This could happen by 2018-2020 (so by the time you would be looking to start a TC - it is something to keep an eye on anyway).

    There isn't a website that states the law firms that do sponsor trainees or not. Even if there was a list, by the time you come round to apply to process could have changed completely anyway and getting a visa could be a lot tougher (or a lot easier).

    If you get a training contract, you are employed. To be employed you have to have the visa. Without a visa you can't be employed.

    I've recruited people from Leicester and Lancaster, although in much smaller numbers than other unis. It is not to say they are not good unis - both are great universities, they just don't have as strong links with the legal professions compared to other universities. Therefore recruiters see a lot less applications from them (particularly Lancaster) than from other unis.

    Lancaster has a great careers service and reasonable law society (got much better in the past few years) but their law faculty isn't great at connecting with the legal recruiters. They struggle with campus visits a little more as Lancaster is quite far away from London.

    Leicester has a fantastic careers service (although not geared up as much to law students) and their law society is much better at linking with law firms, although they probably benefit from a closer location to most cities than Lancaster.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Not as it stands.... for the time being it is the following:

    You do your LLB at undergraduate level.

    Then you do the Legal Practice Course. This is a 6-9 month course that you have to complete before starting a training contract. You would get another tier 4 visa to cover you during this period of time.

    At the moment there isn't a bar exam. This might change, as it is currently being reviewed as to whether something like the New York Bar would replace the LPC. This could happen by 2018-2020 (so by the time you would be looking to start a TC - it is something to keep an eye on anyway).

    There isn't a website that states the law firms that do sponsor trainees or not. Even if there was a list, by the time you come round to apply to process could have changed completely anyway and getting a visa could be a lot tougher (or a lot easier).

    If you get a training contract, you are employed. To be employed you have to have the visa. Without a visa you can't be employed.

    I've recruited people from Leicester and Lancaster, although in much smaller numbers than other unis. It is not to say they are not good unis - both are great universities, they just don't have as strong links with the legal professions compared to other universities. Therefore recruiters see a lot less applications from them (particularly Lancaster) than from other unis.

    Lancaster has a great careers service and reasonable law society (got much better in the past few years) but their law faculty isn't great at connecting with the legal recruiters. They struggle with campus visits a little more as Lancaster is quite far away from London.

    Leicester has a fantastic careers service (although not geared up as much to law students) and their law society is much better at linking with law firms, although they probably benefit from a closer location to most cities than Lancaster.
    Ahhh ok. That makes the process very clear, thank you.
    I also applied to SOAS, Kent and Reading. I've already received an offer from Leicester and am still waiting for an offer from Kent, Reading and Lancaster (my application to SOAS was unsuccessful).
    So considering that these are the 4 universities I could potentially go to, would you say that it is worth coming to the UK as a student and risking the chance for a training contract? I know that it depends on a huge number of variables, and also that you do not know me, but seeing as you seem to be a highly trained recruiter in a good law firm, you know the scope of the land much better than I do. I will also be speaking to some other people before I make my decision (which is still a couple of months away), so I would just love your honest opinion. Would you say that trainees from these 4 universities would/could be given training contract at firms that sponsor Tier 2 visas? If I have very high grades at one of the universities I mentioned, plus other sports/club participation in college, will I stand at least a 75% chance of being recruited by a top law firm which can sponsor my visa? I know that it is extremely difficult for you to answer that question since it is an objective one depending on a lot of factors, but I'd love an answer of some sorts at least.
    Also, how much bias do law firms show domestic students ahead of international students? I've heard from some friends of mine who work in the legal profession that in most countries, the citizens of that country are preferred to international students. Is this true? If so, how huge is the difference?
    Again, thanks a lot for everything.
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    (Original post by pinkisthefloyd)
    Ahhh ok. That makes the process very clear, thank you.
    I also applied to SOAS, Kent and Reading. I've already received an offer from Leicester and am still waiting for an offer from Kent, Reading and Lancaster (my application to SOAS was unsuccessful).
    So considering that these are the 4 universities I could potentially go to, would you say that it is worth coming to the UK as a student and risking the chance for a training contract? I know that it depends on a huge number of variables, and also that you do not know me, but seeing as you seem to be a highly trained recruiter in a good law firm, you know the scope of the land much better than I do. I will also be speaking to some other people before I make my decision (which is still a couple of months away), so I would just love your honest opinion. Would you say that trainees from these 4 universities would/could be given training contract at firms that sponsor Tier 2 visas? If I have very high grades at one of the universities I mentioned, plus other sports/club participation in college, will I stand at least a 75% chance of being recruited by a top law firm which can sponsor my visa? I know that it is extremely difficult for you to answer that question since it is an objective one depending on a lot of factors, but I'd love an answer of some sorts at least.
    Also, how much bias do law firms show domestic students ahead of international students? I've heard from some friends of mine who work in the legal profession that in most countries, the citizens of that country are preferred to international students. Is this true? If so, how huge is the difference?
    Again, thanks a lot for everything.

    Any international student attending those universities COULD get a training contract. There is nothing to suggest why they wouldn't based on those institutions.

    However, the university you attend is not going to be the key deciding factor and no one can tell you what your chances are let alone whether they will be 75% or above. Anyone who attempts to has no idea of what they are talking about, and even if they did they won't know what the market will look like in 3-4 years time when you apply nor what the processes around tier 2 visas will be. We will be coming up to another general election by that time so god knows what will be going on around then in terms of immigration policy.

    However, I would stress that anyone's chances are unlikely to be 75% or above. Even the brightest candidate with a fantastic CV from Oxbridge probably hasn't got that "chance". You are entering a competitive job market where standards are exceptionally high. I rejected more Oxford candidates for one firm than I did for any other university (although I also recruited more Oxford candidates than from any other uni too...).

    Firms have to have a bias towards EU students - its the way the legislation around immigration is based. As a recruiter I have to prove that I can't recruit within the EU first and therefore I am allowed to recruit international students from outside of the EU.

    Many firms like to recruit international students though. Some see it as vital for their business, especially for those who background is in emerging markets like India. However, they tend to recruit directly from Indian Law Schools. For instance Linklaters have an Indian internship programme for which they then recruit trainees for, but all the recruitment for this is done in India rather than the UK.

    Remember a UK LLB does not limit you to opportunities within the UK. I suspect it would help you considerably if you were to return to India and work there instead.

    I don't know enough about other recruitment processes to comment on other countries with any real expertise. The issue with law though is it is very jurisdictional and therefore the knowledge you gain in one law degree does not necessarily allow you to build up the necessary knowledge required in another jurisdiction.

    The UK is quite an anomaly that is allows non-law students to also become lawyers by taking a one year GDL course before taking the LPC, and for many law students who have done their law degree outside of the UK, they have to take the GDL prior to doing the LPC so they have the basics of English law under their belt. A lot of other jurisdictions only allow you to have a law degree from within that country and also often expect it to be to post-graduate level. This is where a lot of the "bias" will come from, especially combined with their own strict immigration laws (e.g. places like the US/Australia etc). The exception is with Commonwealth countries who tend to like English LLBs because the legal frameworks within those countries are built around English law.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Any international student attending those universities COULD get a training contract. There is nothing to suggest why they wouldn't based on those institutions.

    However, the university you attend is not going to be the key deciding factor and no one can tell you what your chances are let alone whether they will be 75% or above. Anyone who attempts to has no idea of what they are talking about, and even if they did they won't know what the market will look like in 3-4 years time when you apply nor what the processes around tier 2 visas will be. We will be coming up to another general election by that time so god knows what will be going on around then in terms of immigration policy.

    Yes that's what I thought too. I thought I could get a rough idea from you, but as you say, it is very difficult to judge the situation quite some time away.

    However, I would stress that anyone's chances are unlikely to be 75% or above. Even the brightest candidate with a fantastic CV from Oxbridge probably hasn't got that "chance". You are entering a competitive job market where standards are exceptionally high. I rejected more Oxford candidates for one firm than I did for any other university (although I also recruited more Oxford candidates than from any other uni too...).
    I would assume that one's chances of getting into one particular firm would not be 75%, but is it really so competitive that such a student from Oxbridge would not have a 75% chance of getting into ANY top law firm? I mean, it is a bit absurd to get into the best college in the UK, get very high grades there, and not even have a 3/4 chance of getting into a top law firm.

    (Original post by J-SP)
    Firms have to have a bias towards EU students - its the way the legislation around immigration is based. As a recruiter I have to prove that I can't recruit within the EU first and therefore I am allowed to recruit international students from outside of the EU.

    Many firms like to recruit international students though. Some see it as vital for their business, especially for those who background is in emerging markets like India. However, they tend to recruit directly from Indian Law Schools. For instance Linklaters have an Indian internship programme for which they then recruit trainees for, but all the recruitment for this is done in India rather than the UK.

    Remember a UK LLB does not limit you to opportunities within the UK. I suspect it would help you considerably if you were to return to India and work there instead.
    Yes, but it is considerably cheaper for me to study at a top law college in India. Law is a profession not respected in India a decade or more ago, but now, colleges like the NLS in Bangalore are widely respected around the world from what I've heard. I think I'll land just as good a job in India by getting into the National Law School as I would after studying in Leicester or Kent. I do not like the idea of practicing law in India though, which is the main reason I want to study abroad. Maybe in a decade or so, the field of law might change a lot, but right now, it's just not very alluring (not for money reasons).
    (Original post by J-SP)
    I don't know enough about other recruitment processes to comment on other countries with any real expertise. The issue with law though is it is very jurisdictional and therefore the knowledge you gain in one law degree does not necessarily allow you to build up the necessary knowledge required in another jurisdiction.
    Yes, and that's one of the main reasons I'm looking very deeply into whether I can work in that country after studying there or not. It doesn't make too much sense for me to study in a pretty good university in that country and then practice in another country.
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    (Original post by pinkisthefloyd)
    I would assume that one's chances of getting into one particular firm would not be 75%, but is it really so competitive that such a student from Oxbridge would not have a 75% chance of getting into ANY top law firm? I mean, it is a bit absurd to get into the best college in the UK, get very high grades there, and not even have a 3/4 chance of getting into a top law firm.
    I'd still estimate it as less than 75% if you are going purely on the basis on high grades from one university.

    As I said earlier, the profession has exceptionally high standards. Academics are just a small part of an application form for a training contract. You have to show a significant amount of other evidence which is probably more important than the academics. There are plenty of exceptionally bright people at top universities who don't have the skill set nor genuine motivation for the career but think they do. There's plenty of people outside of the top universities who DO have that skill set and motivation, and they are going to be recruited before someone with only an impressive academic background.




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    (Original post by J-SP)
    I'd still estimate it as less than 75% if you are going purely on the basis on high grades from one university.

    As I said earlier, the profession has exceptionally high standards. Academics are just a small part of an application form for a training contract. You have to show a significant amount of other evidence which is probably more important than the academics. There are plenty of exceptionally bright people at top universities who don't have the skill set nor genuine motivation for the career but think they do. There's plenty of people outside of the top universities who DO have that skill set and motivation, and they are going to be recruited before someone with only an impressive academic background.
    I do think I got off track a little bit. I would love to discuss the skills required to be a lawyer, but I think that is a different topic.
    I understand that my question of what chance I stand of getting a job at a top law firm able to sponsor a Tier-2 visa was maybe not too intelligent.
    I would like some clarification on the EU vs international graduates part if you could spare the time.
    Do all jobs require you to prove that you cannot hire a EU worker first? So it is not merely enough for an international graduate to have better qualifications than the EU graduate who's also applying? Because that would mean that getting a job in an already competitive market is next to impossible right? Or am I interpreting it wrongly?
    As always, thank you so much for your patient responses. It's been of great help to me
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    (Original post by pinkisthefloyd)
    Do all jobs require you to prove that you cannot hire a EU worker first?

    So it is not merely enough for an international graduate to have better qualifications than the EU graduate who's also applying? Because that would mean that getting a job in an already competitive market is next to impossible right? Or am I interpreting it wrongly?

    As always, thank you so much for your patient responses. It's been of great help to me
    This is starting to get overly complicated in terms of what you are asking and how you are interpreting it.

    Put simply, for training contracts law firms have to prove they have advertised their roles extensively and thoroughly and provide evidence of the volume of applications they have received. They have to justify why they need to apply for a tier 2 visa for someone but it's easy to provide that evidence if you have had 2,000+ applications and you can justify the non-EU candidate is of a higher standard than the EU candidates.

    It's not about qualifications and ultimately at that level the qualifications you need are a degree and GDL/LPC. No other qualifications are required for the job. So you are competing against 10,000s of potential applicants for approximately 5,500-6000 training contracts (roughly how many TCs are available each year across all firms).

    International students will find it much tougher as they can probably only apply to less than a 1000 of those 5000 TC, as the vast majority of firms won't be able to get a tier 2 visa or choose not to for their trainees.

    It doesn't mean it's impossible. As a recruiter approximately 10% of my trainee intake each year required a tier 2 visa (and that's across multiple firms). We applied for them and got them. There was never an issue with applying for them, but we always had the ability to say we had a huge amount of applications and the candidate has excelled during the recruitment process.

    BUT as I said earlier who knows what it will be like in another 3-4 years time when you are looking to apply. Immigration rules could easily change and depending on what happens with the EU negotiations, there is a small risk that the rights of EU workers could dramatically change, which would have an even bigger impact on how people are recruited as trainees.





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    (Original post by J-SP)
    This is starting to get overly complicated in terms of what you are asking and how you are interpreting it.

    Put simply, for training contracts law firms have to prove they have advertised their roles extensively and thoroughly and provide evidence of the volume of applications they have received. They have to justify why they need to apply for a tier 2 visa for someone but it's easy to provide that evidence if you have had 2,000+ applications and you can justify the non-EU candidate is of a higher standard than the EU candidates.

    It's not about qualifications and ultimately at that level the qualifications you need are a degree and GDL/LPC. No other qualifications are required for the job. So you are competing against 10,000s of potential applicants for approximately 5,500-6000 training contracts (roughly how many TCs are available each year across all firms).

    International students will find it much tougher as they can probably only apply to less than a 1000 of those 5000 TC, as the vast majority of firms won't be able to get a tier 2 visa or choose not to for their trainees.

    It doesn't mean it's impossible. As a recruiter approximately 10% of my trainee intake each year required a tier 2 visa (and that's across multiple firms). We applied for them and got them. There was never an issue with applying for them, but we always had the ability to say we had a huge amount of applications and the candidate has excelled during the recruitment process.

    BUT as I said earlier who knows what it will be like in another 3-4 years time when you are looking to apply. Immigration rules could easily change and depending on what happens with the EU negotiations, there is a small risk that the rights of EU workers could dramatically change, which would have an even bigger impact on how people are recruited as trainees
    Right. I'm sorry if I was asking questions that weren't easy to answer or even seemed like the wrong type of questions; I needed a very good idea though on how exactly the market works and whether there was at least a good chance I could get employment in the UK. I cannot return to India (as of now at least), because India recognizes a law degree only after the completion of another undergraduate degree or if the law degree is done over 5 years like in Australia. I am going to be speaking to one or two good lawyers in my city to affirm whether this is really the case.
    Either ways, that's not relevant here.
    I know that the situation could change (even drastically) over the next 3-4 years, but I mean, I can only assess the current situation and make a decision assuming that it's not going to change too much.
    Thank you very much for your knowledgeable replies.
    I don't think I have any other questions at this point.
    Have a good day
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    (Original post by pinkisthefloyd)
    Right. I'm sorry if I was asking questions that weren't easy to answer or even seemed like the wrong type of questions; I needed a very good idea though on how exactly the market works and whether there was at least a good chance I could get employment in the UK. I cannot return to India (as of now at least), because India recognizes a law degree only after the completion of another undergraduate degree or if the law degree is done over 5 years like in Australia. I am going to be speaking to one or two good lawyers in my city to affirm whether this is really the case.
    Either ways, that's not relevant here.
    I know that the situation could change (even drastically) over the next 3-4 years, but I mean, I can only assess the current situation and make a decision assuming that it's not going to change too much.
    Thank you very much for your knowledgeable replies.
    I don't think I have any other questions at this point.
    Have a good day
    In short it is highly competitive, but not impossible. A significant number of international students are offered TCs each year, but they are a small fraction of the total number of TCs available. I'd estimate that there are probably less than 250 non-EU international students securing TCs each year, but there will be 1000s of non-EU international students studying within the UK.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Put simply, for training contracts law firms have to prove they have advertised their roles extensively and thoroughly and provide evidence of the volume of applications they have received.

    t's easy to provide that evidence if you have had 2,000+ applications and you can justify the non-EU candidate is of a higher standard than the EU candidates.

    We applied for them and got them. There was never an issue with applying for them, but we always had the ability to say we had a huge amount of applications and the candidate has excelled during the recruitment process.
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    This is intriguing, because I have heard that one large offeror of TCs in the City (which shall remain nameless) uses the opposite strategy of retrospectively re-advertising individual TCs with requirements so tailored to their offeree that only that offeree could satisfy them.

    It's possible that what I have heard is baloney, though it would be surprising as it was from a non-EU friend who got a TC at said firm.
 
 
 
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