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Edexcel A2 Biology SNAB 6BI04 ~ 6BIO5 June 2016 Watch

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    (Original post by A-LJLB)
    Photosynthesis is on the spec, divided into light dependent and light independent
    Photosynthesis is in the spec both light independent and dependent but the textbook literally says nothing about photosystems or cyclic and noncyclic phosphorylation
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    (Original post by SeemaG18)
    Photosynthesis is in the spec both light independent and dependent but the textbook literally says nothing about photosystems or cyclic and noncyclic phosphorylation
    Yeah but they fit under light dependent, and the SNAB book misses a lot out as I said unfortunately
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    (Original post by SeemaG18)
    Photosynthesis is in the spec both light independent and dependent but the textbook literally says nothing about photosystems or cyclic and noncyclic phosphorylation
    Yeah they are in the speciation and I have seen a question asking about cyclic phosphorylation in the recent papers, I can't remember exactly which one but yeah I am sure as well it is on the speciation

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    Any help please!

    In the article paragraph 38, where its talking about 'assassin cells' destroying cancerous cells. Is this referring to T killer cells or something else?
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    guys when i want to print the article it comes up with a huge watermark. what to do? taking screen shot and printing it but ir comes out blurry


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    Is there like a Whatssapp group i could possibly join.
    Argh Bio Exams...
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    (Original post by ranz)
    guys when i want to print the article it comes up with a huge watermark. what to do? taking screen shot and printing it but ir comes out blurry


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    download the file and open from your documents, then print using adobe reader or something - that normally works for me
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    (Original post by genevievelaw)
    download the file and open from your documents, then print using adobe reader or something - that normally works for me
    yh i tried that not working 😭😢


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    (Original post by ranz)
    yh i tried that not working 😭😢


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    sorry I don't know then - unless you can convert it to a word doc or something
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    (Original post by PlayerBB)
    Solve the questions without reading the synoptic article, however if the question refers to the paragraph number, I read it then solve the question

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    this tip helped me loads, i personally went back ti look for it just to thank u haha, i didnt really think it was possible to do the qs without reading full article, but after ur tip i gave it a go


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    (Original post by ranz)
    guys when i want to print the article it comes up with a huge watermark. what to do? taking screen shot and printing it but ir comes out blurry


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    You have to open it in Adobe reader and then click on layers and uncheck the layer that's got the watermark on it? It's hard to explain but if you Google adobe reader layers then it should make a bit more sense

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    (Original post by Cakey_101)
    Any help please!

    In the article paragraph 38, where its talking about 'assassin cells' destroying cancerous cells. Is this referring to T killer cells or something else?
    I don't think you have to know what they are but there could be a question asking you to suggest how they might work or what they do and then you could talk about T killer cells?

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    (Original post by LThomas694)
    I don't think you have to know what they are but there could be a question asking you to suggest how they might work or what they do and then you could talk about T killer cells?

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    Yeah thats what I thought, although I found this question: Inwhich 3 ways are the “assassin cells” different to lymphocytes? - So it must be a phagocyte right, because T killer is a lymphocyte?
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    Could someone please help me with the following?
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    Heart rate of person from normal heart beat is supposed to be 60 but markscheme says 50 bpm!
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    (Original post by Cakey_101)
    Yeah thats what I thought, although I found this question: Inwhich 3 ways are the “assassin cells” different to lymphocytes? - So it must be a phagocyte right, because T killer is a lymphocyte?
    Ooh actually I'm just reading it now and I don't think they are lymphocytes or phagocytes and there are some differences. Looking at paragraphs 38 and 39, assassin cells only destroy cancerous cells whereas T killer cells destroy body cells infected by pathogens. Assassin cells also identify cancerous cells by sensing 'levels of chemicals found in cancer cells' whereas lymphocytes detect infected cells and pathogens by identifying non self antigens. Assassin cells also destroy cancer cells by causing them to 'commit suicide' which I assume means by inducing apoptosis, whereas T killer cells destroy infected cells by releasing perforin which causes the cell to lyse. I don't think we're supposed to know what assassin cells are but we just have to compare them to what we do know. Assassin cells are also genetically engineered and from the article it looks like they're still being developed so there's no way we would know what they are

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    https://www.tes.com/teaching-resourc...-aids-11271853
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    (Original post by ranz)
    this tip helped me loads, i personally went back ti look for it just to thank u haha, i didnt really think it was possible to do the qs without reading full article, but after ur tip i gave it a go


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    haha I am glad I helped!! And no problem
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    (Original post by LThomas694)
    Ooh actually I'm just reading it now and I don't think they are lymphocytes or phagocytes and there are some differences. Looking at paragraphs 38 and 39, assassin cells only destroy cancerous cells whereas T killer cells destroy body cells infected by pathogens. Assassin cells also identify cancerous cells by sensing 'levels of chemicals found in cancer cells' whereas lymphocytes detect infected cells and pathogens by identifying non self antigens. Assassin cells also destroy cancer cells by causing them to 'commit suicide' which I assume means by inducing apoptosis, whereas T killer cells destroy infected cells by releasing perforin which causes the cell to lyse. I don't think we're supposed to know what assassin cells are but we just have to compare them to what we do know. Assassin cells are also genetically engineered and from the article it looks like they're still being developed so there's no way we would know what they are

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    Ah okay now that make sense! Thank you!!

    Also do you know what the actual difference is between genetic engineering and synthetic biology?
    Is it that genetic engineering consists of genetically modifying an already existing cell by changing its DNA and synthetic biology is producing new biological parts in cells that don't already exist?
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    (Original post by Cakey_101)
    Ah okay now that make sense! Thank you!!

    Also do you know what the actual difference is between genetic engineering and synthetic biology?
    Is it that genetic engineering consists of genetically modifying an already existing cell by changing its DNA and synthetic biology is producing new biological parts in cells that don't already exist?
    Genetic engineering: the 'traditional' type quoted from the report involves cutting and pasting existing genes into another organism
    Synthetic biology involves chemically synthesising DNA from scratch which is used to create new genes.
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    On TES, you can download the ' JUNE 2016 FACTORY OF LIFE SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE EDEXCEL QUESTION 7 QUESTIONS, ANSWERS AND VIUAL AIDS' to help you with your questions as it is comprised of about 90 potential questions and model answers strictly edexcel based and no waffling!
 
 
 
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