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Edexcel A2 Biology SNAB 6BI04 ~ 6BIO5 June 2016 Watch

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    (Original post by Daniel9998)
    what are promoter regions?
    promotor region is the section of DNA which signals the beginning of transcription, allows polymerase to bind to produce mRNA
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    (Original post by Daniel9998)
    what are promoter regions?
    It's a region adjacent to genes where a Transcription Initiation Complex (RNA polymerase, transcription factors etc.) can bind to induce transcription.
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    (Original post by Daniel9998)
    what are promoter regions?
    1.reference to transcription factors ;
    2. bind to promoter region / form a transcription initiationcomplex / eq ;
    3. RNA polymerase can bind /eq ;
    4. mRNA made ;
    5. idea of translation occurring ;

    General mark scheme which applies to all questions... would get you full marks
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    what are advantages and disadvantages of GMOs
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    (Original post by fpmaniac)
    1.reference to transcription factors ;
    2. bind to promoter region / form a transcription initiationcomplex / eq ;
    3. RNA polymerase can bind /eq ;
    4. mRNA made ;
    5. idea of translation occurring ;

    General mark scheme which applies to all questions... would get you full marks
    you beautiful man/woman
    thank you.
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    (Original post by PhysicsIP2016)
    It's a region adjacent to genes where a Transcription Initiation Complex (RNA polymerase, transcription factors etc.) can bind to induce transcription.
    What do you do with the pre release. Will they ask you random questions without referencing them e.g. line 27 and you have to search the entire article for it or are you supposed to know everything from the pre release.
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    (Original post by SohaXO)
    what are advantages and disadvantages of GMOs
    advantages
    - reduces the risk of pesticides which increases the yield of crops and could help feed malnourished people around the world
    - it is cost effective

    disadvantages
    - transference of genes from one organism to another can give rise to antibiotic resistance
    - it could have a negative impact on organic farmers
    - may give rise to allergens in food
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    (Original post by tayloryeah)
    advantages
    - reduces the risk of pesticides which increases the yield of crops and could help feed malnourished people around the world
    - it is cost effective

    disadvantages
    - transference of genes from one organism to another can give rise to antibiotic resistance
    - it could have a negative impact on organic farmers
    - may give rise to allergens in food
    Hey, can you post some of the questions you would think should come up in the pre release please
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    When do you say a transcription-initiation complex is formed which binds to a promoter region rather than just saying the transcription factor binds to promoter regions?
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    (Original post by Susta1nz)
    When do you say a transcription-initiation complex is formed which binds to a promoter region rather than just saying the transcription factor binds to promoter regions?
    Generally, if you are talking about switching on a gene and protein synthesis, you would say a transcription initiation complex which contains transcription factors binds to the promoter gene. Transcription factors are just one part that makes up the TIC.
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    (Original post by fpmaniac)
    What do you do with the pre release. Will they ask you random questions without referencing them e.g. line 27 and you have to search the entire article for it or are you supposed to know everything from the pre release.
    You get a copy of it with the exam.

    The questions can be kind of random, but there is always a link with what you have learned in the course, and in most cases where they want you to use something in the text to answer, they will direct you to it.

    It can be odd because sometimes they want you to combine your own knowledge with what is in the text, and on a few occasions, just want you to use what is in the text (I think these may just be testing your comprehension). Occasionally they ask you to refer to the text without giving a reference.eg."Describe the benefits and risks of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's" was one of the ones I saw, where you needed to look through the entire article for the benefits and risks. These questions seem to be rare though, and even if you get one like it this year, the pre-release is thankfully a short one (the one in the sample assessment was about 20 pages long!) so it would not take you long to go through it.

    What I have found works for me, is if the question gives a direct reference to the article.eg.paragraph 8, I read it and use it and my own knowledge to answer the question. If it doesn't use a direct reference.eg.it mentions something, but does not link to it in the article, I usually don't look at the article and just use my own knowledge to answer. However, it is far better for you to have a go at the questions on the pre-release in a couple of past papers, so you can get a feel for what is expected, and when you need to use the article and when you don't.

    I haven't done any "direct" prep with the pre-release (I don't have time to sit here predicting questions and answers, and I am doing AS and A2 in one year, so I've had to remember all this junk anyway), but I do look through it and look for things that are linked to any of the course specs.eg.I can see references to the human genome project, photosynthesis, biodiesel, ethics of GM, and DNA structure, as well as transcription factors, so it may be worth you doing this and refreshing your knowledge on things you see. If there are any unfamiliar words, look them up to see what they mean.

    Sorry, that was long.
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    (Original post by PhysicsIP2016)
    Generally, if you are talking about switching on a gene and protein synthesis, you would say a transcription initiation complex which contains transcription factors binds to the promoter gene. Transcription factors are just one part that makes up the TIC.
    Oooh okay thanks. So what does the transcription factor usually bind to, to form a transcription initiation factor? Also is there anything different when a gene is stopped from being expressed?
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    (Original post by Susta1nz)
    Oooh okay thanks. So what does the transcription factor usually bind to, to form a transcription initiation factor? Also is there anything different when a gene is stopped from being expressed?
    It binds to the promoter region with RNA polymerase and sometimes steroid hormones too.
    A gene is stopped from being expressed by repressor molecules binding to the promoter region.
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    (Original post by MrSheeple)
    You get a copy of it with the exam.

    The questions can be kind of random, but there is always a link with what you have learned in the course, and in most cases where they want you to use something in the text to answer, they will direct you to it.

    It can be odd because sometimes they want you to combine your own knowledge with what is in the text, and on a few occasions, just want you to use what is in the text (I think these may just be testing your comprehension). Occasionally they ask you to refer to the text without giving a reference.eg."Describe the benefits and risks of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's" was one of the ones I saw, where you needed to look through the entire article for the benefits and risks. These questions seem to be rare though, and even if you get one like it this year, the pre-release is thankfully a short one (the one in the sample assessment was about 20 pages long!) so it would not take you long to go through it.

    What I have found works for me, is if the question gives a direct reference to the article.eg.paragraph 8, I read it and use it and my own knowledge to answer the question. If it doesn't use a direct reference.eg.it mentions something, but does not link to it in the article, I usually don't look at the article and just use my own knowledge to answer. However, it is far better for you to have a go at the questions on the pre-release in a couple of past papers, so you can get a feel for what is expected, and when you need to use the article and when you don't.

    I haven't done any "direct" prep with the pre-release (I don't have time to sit here predicting questions and answers, and I am doing AS and A2 in one year, so I've had to remember all this junk anyway), but I do look through it and look for things that are linked to any of the course specs.eg.I can see references to the human genome project, photosynthesis, biodiesel, ethics of GM, and DNA structure, as well as transcription factors, so it may be worth you doing this and refreshing your knowledge on things you see. If there are any unfamiliar words, look them up to see what they mean.

    Sorry, that was long.
    I understand now. Thanks a lot
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    Those of you doing AS how much of it have you looked over ? Because I only learned it like 3/4 weeks ago I've only had a quick skim to refresh myself as I don't want to waste too much time when the A2 content is so much harder! Best of luck for the morning guys, doing 1 last half hour of panic then calling it a night haha x
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    how do we calibrate respirometer? and come about answering a question on it
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    If there's a question on the Human Genome Project, does anyone have a model answer/mark scheme answer as to what we are expected to write about?
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    (Original post by shooting_stars)
    If there's a question on the Human Genome Project, does anyone have a model answer/mark scheme answer as to what we are expected to write about?
    Yes I would love to know this !
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    (Original post by SohaXO)
    how do we calibrate respirometer? and come about answering a question on it
    We don't need to know a lot of detail for that, you usually get the mark for just saying "calibrate the volume" of the respirometer. The main points are:
    -one peak represents one breath
    -distance from peak to trough is tidal volume
    -counting number of peeaks in one minute gives you breathing rate
    -measure the tidal volume of several peaks to work out a mean, increasing reliability
    -take one reading at rest and one after exercise
    -if comparing two groups of people make sure to standardise gender, age, etc.
    -after exercise distance between two peak decreases
    -tidal volume increases
    -the gradient of the graph is steeper due to increased O2 consumption
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    does anybody think they'll take qs from jan 2014 IAL again? worth looking over?
 
 
 
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